Sudan protester dies from wounds in Darfur clashes: medics

Protests in Sudan broke out in December against Omar Al-Bashir's regime. (AFP/File)
Updated 05 May 2019
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Sudan protester dies from wounds in Darfur clashes: medics

  • A medic from the hospital where the demonstrator received treatment confirmed his death
  • Sudanese officials reported at least 65 people died in protest-related violence

KHARTOUM: A Sudanese protester has died from injuries suffered in clashes between security forces and demonstrators from a camp for displaced people in conflict-wracked Darfur, medics said on Sunday.
Violence erupted Saturday when crowds of protesters from camp Attash clashed with soldiers and paramilitary forces in Nyala, the provincial capital of South Darfur state, the official SUNA news agency reported.
“One person died from injuries suffered in the abdomen during the dispersal of protesters in Nyala by security forces,” a doctors’ committee that is part of the protest campaign against the country’s military rulers said in a statement.
A medic from a hospital in Darfur where the protester had been treated confirmed his death.
Deadly clashes have rocked Sudan since December when protests broke out against the iron-fisted rule of veteran leader Omar Al-Bashir, who was ousted by the army on April 11.
Officials say at least 65 people have died in protest-related violence.
On Saturday, SUNA reported that four members of the army and the paramilitary Rapid Support Force had been “critically wounded” in clashes with protesters from camp Attash, and that there were no casualties among the demonstrators.
But the umbrella group leading the nationwide protests, the Alliance for Freedom and Change, gave a different version of Saturday’s events, condemning what it said was an attack by the army on protesters.
Darfur was torn by years of conflict that erupted in 2003 when ethnic minority rebels took up arms against Khartoum’s Arab-dominated government, accusing it of economic and political marginalization.
The United Nations says about 300,000 people have been killed in Darfur since 2003 and another 2.5 million people displaced in the western region.
Bashir himself is wanted by the Hague-based International Criminal Court on charges of war crimes and genocide in Darfur, which he denies.
In recent years Darfur has seen an overall fall in violence, but on April 13 clashes were reported in the Kalma camp for displaced people that left 14 people dead, according to state media.


Syria says it does not want to fight with Turkey

Updated 18 June 2019
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Syria says it does not want to fight with Turkey

  • Turkey and Russia co-sponsored a deal to de-escalate the unrest in the area
  • Turkey supports Syrian rebels who remain in Idlib

BEIJING: Syria does not want to see fighting with Turkey, its foreign minister said on Tuesday, after Turkey said one of its posts in Syria’s Idlib region was attacked from an area controlled by Syrian government forces.
Russia, which supports Syrian President Bashar Assad in his country’s civil war, and Turkey, long a backer of rebels, co-sponsored a de-escalation pact for the area that has been in place since last year.
But the deal has faltered in recent months, forcing hundreds of thousands of civilians to flee. Idlib is the last remaining bastion of anti-government rebels after eight years of civil war.
“We hope that our military and the Turkish military do not fight. This is our principled stance,” Syrian Foreign Minister Walid Al-Moualem told reporters in Beijing, standing alongside the Chinese government’s top diplomat, State Councillor Wang Yi.
“What we are fighting is terrorists, especially in Idlib, which is Syrian territory, part of our country,” Moualem said in Arabic comments translated into Chinese.
The dominant force in the Idlib region is Tahrir Al-Sham, the latest incarnation of the former Nusra Front that was part of Al-Qaeda until 2016. Others, including some with Turkish backing, also have a presence.
“The question now is, what does Turkey want to do in Syria? Turkey is occupying part of Syrian soil, and has a military presence in certain parts of Syria,” Moualem added.
“Are they protecting the Nusra Front? Are they protecting certain terrorist forces including the East Turkestan Islamic Movement?” he said, referring to an extremist group China blames for attacks in far western Xinjiang with operations elsewhere.
“This question needs to be asked of Turkey, what are their actual aims? We are fighting those terrorist groups and organizations. The whole world believes those people we are fighting are terrorists.”
Since April, Syrian government forces have stepped up shelling and bombing of the area, killing scores of people.
The rebels say the government action is part of a campaign for an assault that would breach the de-escalation pact.
The government and its Russian allies say the action is in response to rebel violations, including the presence of fighters in a demilitarised zone.