Brother of Sudan’s Bashir not in detention: army

Spokesman of the Sudan's Transitional Military Council Lieutenant General Shamseddine Kabbashi speaks during a press conference in Khartoum on May 7, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 14 May 2019
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Brother of Sudan’s Bashir not in detention: army

  • Bashir himself is being held in Khartoum’s Kober prison, according to the council

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s ruling military council said Tuesday that a brother of ousted president Omar Al-Bashir who it previously announced had been detained was actually not in custody.
On April 17, the military council had announced that it had detained two of Bashir’s five brothers — Abdallah Hassan Al-Bashir and Al-Abbas Hassan Al-Bashir.
“This statement was not accurate,” military council spokesman Lt. Gen. Shamseddine Kabbashi told reporters early on Tuesday.
He said on April 17 Abdallah had been arrested, and the next day Abbas was seen in an area bordering with a neighboring country.
“Sudanese authorities have been in contact with this country but it has refused to hand him over to us,” he said without naming the country.
“Then news came that he is in Turkey,” Kabbashi said without specifying whether he was referring to recent media reports of Abbas being in Turkey.
Bashir himself is being held in Khartoum’s Kober prison, according to the council.
On Monday, Sudan’s prosecutor general’s office said Bashir had been charged over the killings of protesters during anti-regime protests that led to his ouster on April 11.
The charges form part of an investigation into the death of a medic killed during a protest in the capital’s eastern district of Burri, the prosecutor general’s office said in a statement.
Ninety people were killed in protest-related violence after demonstrations initially erupted in December, a doctors’ committee linked to the protest movement said last month.
The official death toll is 65.
On Monday, five protesters and an army major were shot dead in Khartoum, according to the committee, just hours after protest leaders and the ruling generals reached a breakthrough agreement on transitional authorities to run the country.
The army rulers who took power after Bashir’s ouster and protest leaders are engaged in negotiations over handing of power from the generals to a civilian administration.


How a Qatari financier helped blacklisted terrorists by using UN loopholes

Updated 7 min 25 sec ago
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How a Qatari financier helped blacklisted terrorists by using UN loopholes

  • UN officials accuse countries such as Qatar of not sufficiently monitoring blacklisted terrorists living within its borders
  • The UN has publicly alleged that a series of disclosures showed Al-Subaiy, a former Qatar central-bank official, continuing to finance terrorists and their activities through 2013

DUBAI: Lenient monitoring and loopholes within the United Nations’ Security Council sanctions procedures have allowed blacklisted terrorists with Al-Qaeda and Daesh gain access to frozen bank accounts, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Among those sanctioned, but gaining access to their accounts, is Qatari financier Khalifa al-Subaiy, who the US says provided significant financial support to Al-Qaeda and 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed.

Al-Subaiy, who was added to the UN terror blacklist in 2008, has been withdrawing funds up to $10,000 from frozen accounts for “basic necessities.” Home countries of blacklisted individuals apply for UN exemptions to sanctions that allow access to small amounts of money in order to pay for living expenses and food.

However, the exemptions procedure is “too loosely structured and lacks oversight,” the report added.

UN officials accuse countries such as Qatar of not sufficiently monitoring blacklisted terrorists living within its borders.

“Exemptions are granted to virtually anyone who asks and for amounts that are sometimes seen as unjustifiably large; requests don't adequately detail needs as required; and there are no spending audits,” the report by the WSJ read.

The UN has publicly alleged that a series of disclosures showed Al-Subaiy, a former Qatar central-bank official, continuing to finance terrorists and their activities through 2013.

“I would be hard-pressed to find someone more prominent than him in the whole terrorism financing side,” said Hans-Jakob Schindler, a senior director at the Counter Extremism Project and former adviser to the UN Security Council, told WSJ.