Something borrowed: Online boutique for pre-worn wedding gowns launches in Dubai

New e-marketplace dresscometrue.com allows brides in the Middle East to sell their pre-loved gowns. (Supplied)
Updated 10 June 2019
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Something borrowed: Online boutique for pre-worn wedding gowns launches in Dubai

  • Some of the dresses are almost 70% cheaper than their original price
  • Sellers can choose to list their dress under three different options of service

DUBAI: Brides-to-be in the Gulf often spend the lead up to their big day frantically searching for the perfect wedding dress. It’s no secret that options in the region are far from plentiful and it isn’t unheard of for brides to head abroad in the hunt for the ultimate bridal gown.

After struggling to find her own wedding dress, Dubai-based entrepreneur Eva Hachem joined forces with her husband Andy Werner to launch Dress Come True, a new platform that allows brides to shop for pre-loved wedding gowns online, with as much as 70 percent off the original retail price.

“I got married in Dubai and… I struggled to find my dream dress. I found that the prices were unreasonable and I either had to compromise on the selection or on the price,” Hachem told Arab News.

“After the wedding, I wanted to sell the dress so I picked up the phone and called boutiques and I said ‘okay, all the brides who buy from you, where do they re-sell their dress?’ They said, ‘We wish (we knew), all the brides ask us.”

The exchange sparked an idea that quickly snowballed into the new platform, one where brides can sell the “one dress you will never wear again,” while making sure it goes to someone who will cherish the gown.  

Loved-up newlyweds can list their gowns on the website for a one-time fee, with three options available. The basic package costs $22 and requires the seller to organize the delivery, while the second option allows the seller to fall back on the Dress Come True team to organize the delivery for a one-time fee of $35. Finally, for $41, sellers can avail the so-called concierge service, where the company handles all aspects of the sale.

But can brides bear to part with such an important item of clothing?

“Yesterday we talked to a bride who said something very interesting,” Hachem told Arab News. “She said, ‘I have had my dress for two years and I cherish it, but I don’t want to keep it. I never had the heart to list it next to any other item… So, when I saw the (website) and how the dresses are valued, it felt like the right place to list my dress. It has sentimental value, but you are not going to wear it again.’”


Myriam Fares apologizes to Egyptian fans after backlash

Lebanese pop superstar Myriam Fares has apologized to her Egyptian fans over comments she made at a press conference. (File: AFP)
Updated 24 June 2019
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Myriam Fares apologizes to Egyptian fans after backlash

DUBAI: Lebanese pop superstar Myriam Fares has apologized to her Egyptian fans over comments she made at a press conference for the Moroccan Mawazine Festival on Saturday.

In a press appearance before her gig at the music festival, the star was questioned by a journalist and asked why she doesn’t perform in Egypt as much as she used to.

“I will be honest with you,” she told the journalist, “I’ve grown over the years and so did the pay and my demands, so it became a bit heavy on Egypt.”

The comment triggered intense backlash on social media, with many offended Twitter users using the platform to vent.

Egyptian singer and actor Ahmed Fahmi, who starred alongside Fares in a 2014 TV show, He replied to her comments sarcastically, tweeting: “Now you are too much for Egypt. Learn from the stars of the Arab world. You will understand that you did the biggest mistake of your life with this statement.”

Then, Egyptian songwriter Amir Teima tweeted: “Most Lebanese megastars like Elissa, Nawal (El Zoghby), Nancy (Ajram), Ragheb (Alama), and the great Majida El-Roumi have performed in Egypt after the revolution. You and I both know they get paid more than you do. Don’t attack Egypt; if it’s not out of respect, do it out of wit.”

Now, Fares has replied to the comments and has blamed the misunderstanding on her Lebanese dialect, saying: “I always say in my interviews that although I started from Lebanon, I earned my stardom in Egypt. I feel sorry that my Lebanese dialect and short reply created chances for a misunderstanding.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Myriam Music (@myriammusicofficial) on

She ended her Instagram apology by saying, “Long live Egypt.”