At home in Nasab, Dubai’s co-working space of the future

The club is part of the latest project by Mohammed Zaal. (Supplied)
Updated 13 August 2019

At home in Nasab, Dubai’s co-working space of the future

  • Mohammed Zaal may only be in his mid-30s, but he is already a legend in Dubai real estate
  • n the seven months since opening, Nasab has become a haven for Dubai’s creative talent

DUBAI: Nasab, Dubai’s new members-only social club, is also a co-working space you will want to live in all day, every day.

Mohammed Zaal may only be in his mid-30s, but he is already a legend in Dubai real estate, as the developer and former CEO of Al-Barari, a luxury residential area built to be a botanical haven. His latest project in Dubai is KOA Canvas, where you’ll find Nasab, and it has a boutique take on living.

“We’re providing a truly engaged community, a forward-thinking collective, which is entirely unique in the region’s landscape,” Zaal explained.

A three-storey space, Nasab‘s facilities include a photography studio, a high-altitude chamber, three pools and Lowe, an innovative contemporary dining restaurant. And when it comes to working spaces, they have thought of everything, right down to soundproof phone booths. 

In the seven months since opening, Nasab has become a haven for Dubai’s creative talent. Don’t be surprised to see influencer Anum Bashir of Desert Mannequin in a meeting or Australian artist Reif Axl Myers working on an artwork in one of the private office spaces. This is truly a new-age club, as Zaal said: “We are building a space where community and collaboration are at the core. Being a part of Nasab is to be a part of a network that is working and growing together as one to create new ways of working and living.” 

And while Nasab is discerning about its members, it has ensured that it is also very inclusive. For example, the “Nomad” plan for non-Dubai residents allows access to the club for 10 days every month. “We are looking for people who are shaping the future of culture,” Zaal said. So, of course, it has a busy social calendar and recently hosted an evening of conversation with Kuwaiti artist and poet Shurooq Amin.

But it’s the design that is the space’s first attraction, as it’s curated to be happy place for taste-makers. “Design runs in the family,” said Zaal, who has his own private office in the space. “My mother is an interior designer, my sister is a landscape designer, so I have always been very influenced by aesthetics and design. Art is a non-negotiable part of life for me.” 


Egyptian DJ Raveland makes melting-pot music from the UAE

DJ Raveland was raised in Abu Dhabi. (Supplied)
Updated 18 min 34 sec ago

Egyptian DJ Raveland makes melting-pot music from the UAE

DUBAI: The Egyptian music producer and DJ who goes by the name Raveland has surprised his fans with a new hit this summer. 

Raveland hosts concerts around the UAE. (Supplied)

Honoring the Swedish musician Avicii, who died in Oman last year, “My Way” is an old-school house music track. “Avicii was one of my idols. Nothing will top his productions, but I wanted to bring back this vibe to the industry,” the artist told Arab News. 

“‘My Way’ is different from everything I have done before. It is calm, and focuses more on the vocals and the melody,” he added. 

The musician, who is signed with Universal Music MENA, was able to build a large fan base with tracks and mix tapes reaching more than 100,000 streams and downloads internationally. 

The DJ’s ambitions pushed him to release a music video for his track “Rêve” on Vevo that featured one of his events in Abu Dhabi with fans enjoying his various music genres.

Raised in Abu Dhabi, Raveland has been touring around the UAE to perform his tracks, including “Resolution 19,” “Dreamville” and “Way to Tomorrowland.”

In June, he released an extended play – a short album featuring four tracks – called “28.” From trance to romantic, “28” had it all. 

Raveland released his recent album "28" this summer. (Supplied)

Under the big umbrella of electronic dance music, Raveland’s productions bring different cultures together. One of his “28” tracks, “Auaha,” is inspired by New Zealand’s old tribes. “My passion for music is endless. I am constantly trying to explore more genres and more types of music to target a larger audience.” 

Raveland has previously collaborated with musicians such as the UAE-based DJ XABB and the Tunisian DJ Eyjey. Exclusively to Arab News, Raveland announced that he is working on a piece that follows the Latino genre reggaeton, like the famous “Despacito” hit, in collaboration with a Puerto Rican singer. 

The DJ also promised to bring back his online radio show, called “We Are Ravelands,” which has been on hiatus for a few months. “I will bring it back, real strong,” the host said. “The show will feature a lot of collaborations from all around the world, like Egypt, Spain and the US.”