Alwaleed Philanthropies donating $1m for Sri Lanka flood relief

A boy carries water bottles near a flood affected area near Colombo. (AP)
Updated 24 May 2016
0

Alwaleed Philanthropies donating $1m for Sri Lanka flood relief

RIYADH: Alwaleed Philanthropies (AP), chaired by Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, is donating $1 million to provide support to those affected by the recent floods and landslides that have caused devastation in Sri Lanka.
The announcement comes as delegates from 175 countries gather in Istanbul today for the opening of the first ever World Humanitarian Summit.
At the summit, global leaders are discussing how to effectively respond to major humanitarian challenges like the one in Sri Lanka, and how to be better prepared to meet challenges of the future.
The disaster in Sri Lanka has claimed the lives of dozens of people, with hundreds of thousands displaced from their homes.
Though Sri Lanka frequently experiences severe monsoons and flooding, this year’s devastation was unusually fierce for so early in the rainy season.
 AP’s funds will be used to provide vital relief to victims of the disaster, through the foundation’s partnerships with the UN World Food Programme, Habitat for Humanity and International Medical Corps.
The UN World Food Programme is the world’s largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide. In emergencies, it gets food to where it is needed, saving the lives of victims of war, civil conflict and natural disasters. After the cause of an emergency has passed, it uses food to help communities rebuild their lives.
Habitat for Humanity works with the poorest and the most vulnerable to help provide them with a decent place to call home and the opportunity for a life built on hope and potential, self-reliance and dignity.
International Medical Corps works to relieve the suffering of those impacted by war, natural disaster and disease by delivering vital health care services that focus on training, helping devastated populations return to self-reliance.
 “This crisis reinforces just how important this week’s discussions are at the World Humanitarian Summit. One of the core aims of the Summit is to enable countries and communities to better prepare for and respond to crises just like this one in Sri Lanka,” said Nauf Al-Rawaf, executive manager of Global Initiatives at AP.
For over 35 years, Alwaleed Philanthropies has supported and initiated projects in over 120 countries regardless of gender, race, or religion.
Alwaleed Philanthropies collaborates with a range of philanthropic, governmental and educational organizations to combat poverty, empower women and youth, develop communities, provide disaster relief and create cultural understanding through education.


Libya’s National Oil against paying ‘ransom’ to reopen El Sharara field

Updated 14 December 2018
0

Libya’s National Oil against paying ‘ransom’ to reopen El Sharara field

  • Ransom payment would set dangerous precedent
  • NOC declared force majeure on exports on Monday

BENGHAZI: Libya’s state-owned National Oil Corp. (NOC) said it was against paying a ransom to an armed group that has halted crude production at the country’s largest oilfield.
“Any attempt to pay a ransom to the armed militia which shut down El Sharara (oilfield) would set a dangerous precedent that would threaten the recovery of the Libyan economy,” NOC Chairman Mustafa Sanalla said in a statement on the company’s website.
NOC on Monday declared force majeure on exports from the 315,000-barrels-per-day oilfield after it was seized at the weekend by a local militia group.
The nearby El-Feel oilfield, which uses the same power supply as El Sharara, was still producing normally, a spokesman for NOC said, without giving an output figure. The field usually pumps around 70,000 bpd.
Since 2013 Libya has faced a wave of blockages of oilfields and export terminals by armed groups and civilians trying to press the country’s weak state into concessions.
Officials have tended to end such action by paying off protesters who demand to be added to the public payroll.
At El Sharara, in southern Libya, a mix of state-paid guards, civilians and tribesmen have occupied the field, camping there since Saturday, protesters and oil workers said. The protesters work in shifts, with some going home at night.
NOC has evacuated some staff by plane, engineers at the oilfield said. A number of sub-stations away from the main field have been vacated and equipment removed.
The occupiers are divided, with members of the Petroleum Facilities Guard (PFG) indicating they would end the blockade in return for a quick cash payment, oil workers say. The PFG has demanded more men be added to the public payroll.
The tribesmen have asked for long-term development funds, which might take time.
Libya is run by two competing, weak governments. Armed groups, tribesmen and normal Libyans tend to vent their anger about high inflation and a lack of infrastructure on the NOC, which they see as a cash cow booking billions of dollars in oil and gas revenues annually.