Herfy to open outlets in Bangladesh

Herfy CEO Ahmed H. Al-Said, Bangladesh Ambassador Golam Moshi, and Greenland chairman Mohammad Abdul Hye cut the cake to celebrate the signing of franchise agreement in Riyadh. (AN photo by Iqbal Hossain)
Updated 04 June 2016
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Herfy to open outlets in Bangladesh

RIYADH: Herfy, a major Saudi fast-food services company, has signed an Area Development Franchise Agreement with Greenland Services Ltd., a business unit of Greenland Group of Bangladesh, to expand its business horizon beyond the Middle East.
The agreement spells out a vision to open 30 Herfy outlets in Bangladesh in a staggered schedule within a few years.
A signing ceremony for the agreement held here recently was attended by Herfy CEO Ahmed H. Al-Said, Bangladesh Ambassador Golam Moshi and Greeland Chairman Mohammad Abdul Hye.
The ceremony was also attended by a large number of guests and
Diplomats, top executives of the Herfy Food Services led by Al-Said, and a large number of guests were also present.
This is the first agreement of its kind between the private sector of the two countries as the Bangladesh economy remained strong and resilient despite external and internal challenges.
In fact, Bangladesh is among the top 12 developing countries with a population of over 20 million, which achieved 6 plus percent growth in 2016.
Now, Bangladesh needs to focus on a growth agenda centered on sustainable and inclusive growth.
Referring to the Herfy-Greenland deal, a press statement said that the agreement entitles Greenland to open 30 stores in Bangladesh within a few years from now. Herfy, as a market leader in fast-food, aspires to expand its presence in other countries. “The business accord that ensures opening of Herfy restaurants in Bangladesh is the first step toward that direction,” said Abdul Hye.
He pointed out that the first Herfy restaurant will be opened this year. He added that Greenland was interested to bring 100 percent halal and hygienic food to the Bangladesh market following the deal with Herfy.
The move to open Herfy dine-in and drive-through restaurants in Bangladesh is significant keeping in view the rapid growth of the fast-food industry sector of Bangladesh.
The food taking habits, especially in the fast-food segment, has been changed a lot over last decade among the people of that South Asian nation.
A large number of Bangladeshi nationals, who have been residing and working in the Kingdom, have developed tastes and likings for Saudi fast-foods including Herfy.
“Today, Herfy is a major fast food restaurant chain in the Kingdom and one of the largest in the Middle East, surpassing international chains in terms of presence,” the statement added.


Former Nissan chairman Ghosn appears in Tokyo court

Updated 12 min 25 sec ago
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Former Nissan chairman Ghosn appears in Tokyo court

  • It is the first of a series of hearings to iron out logistics for Carlos Ghosn’s actual trial
  • Nissan’s former chairman has hired a strong legal team as he fights to clear his name
TOKYO: Nissan’s former chairman, Carlos Ghosn, appeared in a Japanese courtroom Thursday for a hearing ahead of his trial on accusations of financial misconduct.
It was the first of a series of hearings to iron out logistics for Ghosn’s actual trial. The trial date has not been set, and experts say it could be months away.
Ghosn, who led the Japanese automaker for two decades, was arrested in November and charged with underreporting his income and breach of trust. He was released on bail in March, rearrested in April on fresh accusations and then released again on bail on April 25.
Ghosn insists he is innocent and says he was targeted in a “conspiracy” by others at Nissan Motor Co.
Nissan, which is allied with Renault of France, has seen profits nose-dive amid the fallout from Ghosn’s arrest.
Ghosn has hired a strong legal team as he fights to clear his name. One of his top lawyers, Junichiro Hironaka, was seen walking into the courtroom Thursday with Ghosn.
One of the conditions of Ghosn’s release on bail is that he is forbidden to contact his wife. Prosecutors say that’s to prevent evidence tampering.
Ghosn’s lawyers challenged that restriction, saying it is a violation of human rights, but the Supreme Court rejected their appeal Tuesday.
The lawyers can appeal again to have the restriction removed.
In a briefing Thursday, Deputy Chief Prosecutor Shin Kukimoto welcomed the Supreme Court’s decision.
“For married people to be together is important, but I feel there was enough reason for the Supreme Court to support us in this restriction,” he said.
Kukimoto declined comment on the hearing, which was closed to reporters and the public.
Kukimoto also said the maximum penalty upon conviction of all 15 counts of the charges Ghosn is facing is 15 years in prison and a fine of ¥150 million ($1.4 million).