Pokémon Go ‘haram’

In this July 12, 2016, file photo, Pinsir, a Pokemon, is found by a group of Pokemon Go players at Bayfront Park in downtown Miami. The “Pokemon Go” craze has sent legions of players hiking around cities and battling with “pocket monsters” on their smartphones. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz, File)
Updated 20 July 2016
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Pokémon Go ‘haram’

JEDDAH: An old fatwa banning the Pokemon Go game has been renewed.
The General Secretariat of the Council of Senior Scholars, on the website of the General Presidency for Scholarly Research and Ifta, has explicitly renewed the fatwa of the Standing Committee for Issuing Fatwas banning the controversial mobile game.
The old fatwa (No. 21,758), issued 16 years ago in 2001, considered the game a form of gambling, which is forbidden in Islam.
Sheikh Saleh Al-Fozan, a member of the Council of Senior Scholars, said that the current version of the game is the same as the old one.
The fatwa cited a number of prohibitions that justify the banning of the game, including gambling practices as two of the players compete to gain cards which hold different prices, and the stronger position of the two players wins the card; if the other player does not want to lose the card, he or she must pay its price.
The other prohibitions concern polytheism and the belief in and worship of many gods, in addition to the promotion and advertising of disbelief, logos, forbidden images and other caveats.


Future leaders key to achieve ‘Vision 2030’

Updated 2 min 59 sec ago
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Future leaders key to achieve ‘Vision 2030’

JEDDAH: Saudi Minister of Civil Service and Chairman of the Institute of Public Administration Sulaiman Al-Hamdan inaugurated the “Developing Future Leaders” roundtable on Wednesday. 

“The Kingdom achieved a distinguished civilizational status due to the wise developmental policies adopted by King Salman’s government as part of its engagement to move forward and achieve more successes and allow the Kingdom to assume its proper regional and international position,” Al-Hamdan said.

“I hope this event will reflect positively on the Kingdom’s administrative development process through the achievement of its objectives,” he said, noting that “the Kingdom’s strategic approach and ambitious vision pose an unprecedented challenge to the civil service system on various levels.”

“The ministry sought to provide an integrated human resources management system by empowering government agencies to effectively play their developmental roles. It did so through a series of directives such as reviewing and developing the executive regulations of the civil service system.”

Dr. Mushabab Al-Qahtani, the institute’s director general, noted that “preparing a second generation of leaders will greatly contribute to the achievement of the Kingdom’s vision.” 

“The subjects of this event aim at highlighting the importance of developing future leaders while discussing the latest means to do so and the role of current leaders in the process,” he said.

“The Kingdom, with the directives of its wise leadership, drew a road map leading to the future national development. It accorded great attention to building and developing human capital,” he added, pointing out that “King Salman’s government greatly focused on administrative and human capital development. This stresses its keenness to develop future leaders through diverse projects, plans and initiatives in order to achieve a sustainable development.”