Air Djibouti takes delivery of first aircraft for new commercial operations

1 / 2
Bruce Dickinson, chairman of Cardiff Aviation, which provides Air Djibouti with operational management.
2 / 2
The plane will officially go into service on Aug. 16, flying to regional destinations initially.
Updated 11 August 2016
0

Air Djibouti takes delivery of first aircraft for new commercial operations

LONDON: Air Djibouti has taken delivery of the first Boeing 737-400 aircraft in Djibouti in preparation for the launch of Air Djibouti’s new commercial operations.
Ismail Omar Guelleh, president of Djibouti, Aboubaker Omar Hadi, chairman of Air Djibouti, along with other dignitaries, met the plane and crew at Djibouti’s International Airport in a ceremony welcoming this important step in Djibouti’s development as a global transport hub.
Bruce Dickinson, chairman of Cardiff Aviation, which provides Air Djibouti with operational management, delivered the Boeing 737-400 personally.
The plane traveled from Cardiff, stopping in Malta for re-fueling.
The plane will officially go into service on Aug. 16, flying to regional destinations initially.
Air Djibouti plans to introduce two BA146-300 aircraft by mid-September and mid-October, and a Boeing 767-200 in December this year, initially operating between Djibouti and London.
Other international destinations are expected to follow soon after, as well as regional freight services.
UK-based aircraft services and maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) company, Cardiff Aviation, is providing technical assistance and management, and secured the European-level Air Operator’s Certificate for Air Djibouti.
The launch of Air Djibouti’s commercial operations is a crucial element of the Djibouti Ports and Free Zones Authority’ (DPFZA) strategy for establishing Djibouti as a major logistics center for the region.
With two new airports under construction that are expected to be operational by 2019, the country is building its air transport links to complement its already well established road, rail and maritime transport network.
Bruce Dickinson said: “The arrival of the first aircraft comes at a particularly exciting time for the region as Djibouti leads in spearheading the growth of aviation in East Africa.”
Djibouti is strategically located on the second busiest shipping lane in the world. It is a natural meeting point for the East and West’s global business development.
The DPFZA is working to replicate its success in port logistics in the aviation sector.
Air Djibouti’s commercial operations will further develop the country’s international connections and accessibility.
Djibouti’s current transport and logistics infrastructure program exceeds $15 billion.
Aboubaker Omar Hadi, chairman of Air Djibouti and Djibouti Ports and Free Zones Authority, said: “Today’s flight shows how Djibouti is opening up to become a major global trade and investment hub.”
The chairman said: “With investment in our port facilities, free trade zones, the upcoming completion of the Addis Ababa-Djibouti railway and the launch of sea/air cargo transportation, Djibouti is completing the multimodal transport missing link. In doing so, the nation confirms its position as a trade and transport hub. The establishment of a flag carrier is an integral part of the DPFZA’s drive to achieve excellence in logistics.”


Oil rises after US Navy destroys Iranian drone

Updated 19 July 2019
0

Oil rises after US Navy destroys Iranian drone

  • The International Energy Agency is revising its 2019 global oil demand growth forecast to 1.1 million barrels per day
  • Speculators have exited options positions that could have provided exposure to higher prices in the next several years

TOKYO: Oil prices rose more than 1 percent on Friday after the US Navy destroyed an Iranian drone in the Strait of Hormuz, a major chokepoint for global crude flows, again raising tensions in the Middle East.
Brent crude futures were up 82 cents, or 1.3 percent, at $62.75 by 0100 GMT. They closed down 2.7 percent on Thursday, falling for a fourth day.
West Texas Intermediate crude futures firmed 61 cents, or 1.1 percent, at 55.91. They fell 2.6 percent in the previous session.
The United States said on Thursday that a US Navy ship had “destroyed” an Iranian drone in the Strait of Hormuz after the aircraft threatened the vessel, but Iran said it had no information about losing a drone.
The move comes after Britain pledged to defend its shipping interests in the region, while US Central Command chief General Kenneth McKenzie said the United States would work “aggressively” to enable free passage after recent attacks on oil tankers in the Gulf.
Still, the longer-term outlook for oil has grown increasingly bearish.
The International Energy Agency (IEA) is reducing its 2019 oil demand forecast due to a slowing global economy amid a US-China trade spat, its executive director said on Thursday.
The IEA is revising its 2019 global oil demand growth forecast to 1.1 million barrels per day (bpd) and may cut it again if the global economy and especially China shows further weakness, Fatih Birol said.
“China is experiencing its slowest economic growth in the last three decades, so are some of the advanced economies ... if the global economy performs even poorer than we assume, then we may even look at our numbers once again in the next months to come,” Birol told Reuters in an interview.
Last year, the IEA predicted that 2019 oil demand would grow by 1.5 million bpd but had already cut the growth forecast to 1.2 million bpd in June this year.
Speculators have exited options positions that could have provided exposure to higher prices in the next several years, market participants said on Thursday.
US offshore oil and gas production has continued to return to service since Hurricane Barry passed through the Gulf of Mexico last week, triggering platform evacuations and output cuts.
Royal Dutch Shell, a top Gulf producer, said Wednesday it had resumed about 80 percent of its average daily production in the region.