Saudi prince executed for killing fellow citizen

Updated 30 October 2016
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Saudi prince executed for killing fellow citizen

JEDDAH: The Ministry of Interior said Prince Turki bin Saud bin Turki bin Saud Al-Kabeer was executed on Tuesday in Riyadh for killing Adel bin Suleiman bin Abdulkareem Al-Muhaimeed, a fellow Saudi citizen.
According to a ministry statement, the prince shot to death Al-Muhaimeed during a mass brawl.
The ministry said security officers arrested the offender and after a series of investigations charged him with murder.
The case was referred to the General Court, which convicted him of the charges brought against him and sentenced him to death. The ruling was supported by the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court, and a royal decree was issued to carry out the ruling.
The Ministry of Interior said the penalty confirms the keenness of the government to ensure security, justice and safety for all.


Saudi Arabia is world’s energy ‘shock absorber’ says Energy Minister Al-Falih

Updated 8 min 21 sec ago
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Saudi Arabia is world’s energy ‘shock absorber’ says Energy Minister Al-Falih

RIYADH: Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih on Monday said that the Kingdom was the world’s energy “shock absorber” and pledged to continue to offer a cushion to global supply interruptions.
He told an energy event in India that it was time this balancing role was respected and acknowledged by the international community.
His remarks come amid concerns among energy-importing nations about the recent rise in the oil price.
“We could have another unanticipated, unplanned disruption. We’ve seen Libya, we’ve seen Nigeria, we’ve seen Venezuela and we have sanctions on Iran. These supply disruptions need a shock absorber,” Al-Falih told the CERAWeek event by IHS Markit.
“The shock absorber has been, to a large part, Saudi Arabia. We have invested tens of billions of dollars to build the spare capacity which has been two to three million barrels over the years — thats equivalent of production capacity of major producers.
“It has been like a spinning reserve in an electricity system waiting to step in if there is a disruption. We’ve done it out of a sense of responsibility.”
He added that the Kingdom wanted to continue playing that global balancing role but also hoped that “the global community of nations will respect and acknowledge what Saudi Arabia has done.”
In a wide ranging address, Al-Falih also questioned the “hype” around the electric vehicle market and said that petrol and diesel engines would co-exist with emerging electric and hydrogen fuel cell technologies for much longer than some commentators expect.
Saudi Arabia is boosting its energy ties with India and Al-Falih said Saudi corporations including Aramco, SABIC and Ma’aden planned to increase investments in the country.