Jeddah’s Hip Hop Night

Updated 10 October 2012

Jeddah’s Hip Hop Night

The weekend started off with an unforgettable evening at the US Consulate where eight local talents were discovered and others were supported. The US Consulate hosted ‘Saudis First National Hip Hop’ night for local rappers/musicians last Wednesday with a large audience who attended to show support, and others to discover new talents.
Hassan AKA Big Hass, also known as the founder of RE-VOLT Radio, a music activist and the creator of Saudis first Hip Hop FM radio show, hosted the event with great energy saying “It was an honor to host and introduce the event. I am proud of the local scene and how they all got together and supported each other, everyone had the back of real hip hop!”
The event started with Noureddin Hossam, a 19-year-old college student at the College of Business Administration, who’s also a music producer. “My interest in music started when I was 15-16-years-old goofing through music programs using my laptop,” he commented, which lead him to the chance to be part of such musical events. “I believed I would be big someday,” he added.
Big Hass introducing himself to the audience wondering aloud, “Why do people go outside to steal music when we have great local talents hidden here?” The audience agreed with encouraging applause.
Afterwards, headed to the stage were singers Ayzee, Speech, Jeddah FAM, Timba & Zion, Abz, Westside Us, Run Conjunction and finally ending with Edan followed by Paten Locke. They covered most areas of Hip Hop genres varying from pop-rap, rap core, freestyle rap, and reggae to dance hall, bringing the audience joy by hearing music that made them want to dance.
ArabNews asked the audience for their opinion regarding the event, and a reply came from Nadia, who happens to be a musician (pianist) herself. “It was fantastic, I greatly enjoyed the night. I was also impressed with all the hidden local talents! I always love to encourage fellow musicians! I’m really proud.”
Another thought “It was definitely above average, especially since they are local artists. Great performance”
As for Zion, whose interest in music started at the age of eight, and began writing music at the age of 13 after the encouragement he got from his younger brother, commented “Such an amazing opportunity to have the chance to sing to such a great, supportive audience.” Zion describes his music as a mixture of reggae and dancehall, inspired by musicians such as Sean Paul.
The Westside Us, a band of five, started the band in 2006. “Our band is more likely to be described as a family rather than just for fun. As for our main purpose, it is to spread positivity and life through rap music by reaching not for better, but the best,” They added “We had such a great time here, and with all the support from these people. It was a really great opportunity.”

E-mail_ [email protected]


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.