‘Suspicious’ Qnet banned

Updated 02 October 2012
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‘Suspicious’ Qnet banned

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia has banned Qnet, a network marketing company, and said it would punish those involved in the suspicious business venture. “This network marketing activity involves deception of citizens and has been banned in a number of countries,” the Ministry of Commerce and Industry said.
The ministry urged Saudis and expatriates not to take part in the activities of such network marketing companies. It also advised the public to inform the ministry about individuals promoting such business by calling the toll-free number 8001241616.
“This business activity has not been registered with the ministry. Moreover, there have been official instructions in the past banning activities that involve deception and stealing others’ money through falsification,” it explained.
The ministry stressed that it would take all measures to stop this form of business activity in the Kingdom with the support of relevant agencies.
Qnet has introduced itself as the world’s largest and fastest-growing online shopping and business community. “Ever since 1998, we’ve been home to a new breed of healthy, happy and successful people of all ages, races, gender and socioeconomic status,” it said.
As an established, dynamic direct selling company, we provide the framework and tools that allow our members to actively raise their quality of life through value-added lifestyle products and through our network marketing business opportunity and attractive Compensation Plan, its website said.


Saudi Arabia’s King Salman will patronize the launch of the Qiddiya Project

Updated 41 min 39 sec ago
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Saudi Arabia’s King Salman will patronize the launch of the Qiddiya Project

  • Qiddiya Project is the new entertainment, sports and cultural destination in the Kingdom
  • The first phase will be completed by 2022

RIYADH: Saudi King Salman will launch the construction of an “entertainment city” near Riyadh Wednesday, authorities said, part of a series of multi-billion dollar projects as the Kingdom seeks to diversity its oil-reliant economy.
The 334-square kilometer project in Qiddiya, southwest of Riyadh, would rival Walt Disney and include high-end theme parks, motor sport facilities and a safari park, officials say.
The facility highlights a “relentless effort to develop giga-projects that will help achieve many direct and indirect economic returns,” project official Fahd bin Abdullah Tounsi was quoted as saying in a government statement on Monday.
Qiddiya chief executive Michael Reininger said he expects the project will draw foreign investors in entertainment and other sectors, but did not specify the total cost of construction.
Such projects are the brainchild of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, a self-styled liberal change agent who is the chief architect of the sweeping “Vision 2030” reform program.
Saudi Arabia has dazzled investors with several plans for hi-tech “giga projects,” funded in part by its sovereign wealth fund, but some skeptics question their viability in an era of cheap oil.
The Kingdom has unveiled blueprints to build NEOM, a mega project billed as a regional Silicon Valley, in addition to the Red Sea project, a reef-fringed resort destination — both worth hundreds of billions of dollars.
Analysts say the projects could create funding pressures at a time when the government faces a yawning budget deficit and growth in the Kingdom’s non-oil economy is only slowly gathering pace.
The reform stems partly from an economic motive to boost domestic spending on entertainment as the Kingdom has been reeling from an oil slump since 2014.
Saudis currently splurge billions of dollars annually to see films and visit amusement parks in neighboring tourist hubs like Dubai and Bahrain.
In February, Saudi Arabia’s General Entertainment Authority (GEA) announced it will stage more than 5,000 festivals and concerts in 2018, double the number of last year, and pump $64 billion in the sector in the coming decade.