Hafiz: Inspiration for job seekers

Updated 23 May 2012
0

Hafiz: Inspiration for job seekers

JEDDAH: More than a million Saudis are benefiting from the Hafiz unemployment program launched in 2011.
On the occasion of the seventh anniversary of King Abdullah’s accession to throne, officials from various sectors and Hafiz beneficiaries said that Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques is a fair, smart and generous king.
They added that his heart is with his people and that he is the first leader in the Middle East who launched an initiative to support the unemployed financially.
The Hafiz program, which pays unemployed Saudis SR2,000 ($533) a month for up to one year, was announced by King Abdullah during the Arab uprisings last spring and introduced in late 2011.
Saud Sultan, executive manger of the social responsibility committee at Jeddah Chamber for Commerce and Industry (JCCI), stated that Hafiz helps in solving problems for many Saudi families, and shows the king’s wisdom in alleviating unemployment and poverty.
“When the Kingdom's unemployment rate became higher, King Abdullah used his wisdom to create a program that enabled Saudis to receive money on a monthly basis for a temporary period while looking for jobs,” he said.
“Due to my position at the JCC,I I can ensure that Hafiz plays a prominent role in supporting youth — both men and women — as it also helps push youth into the labor market.”
According to reports issued by the Ministry of Labor, joblessness costs the government SR5.5 billion a year as around 90 percent of working Saudis are employed by the government, while 90 percent of jobs in private companies are filled by around 8 million foreigners.
“King Abdullah’s generosity pushed him to create a brilliant program called Hafiz. This program is actually a database that gathers the names of unemployed Saudis who need money. Then after launching this program, he launched another one called ‘Liqaat’ that brings both job seekers and employers together. Hafiz is considered the first foundation stone that defines the number of unemployed, then supports them financially with a monthly stipend of around SR3,000 and gives them the opportunity to meet employers,” said Mohamed Al-Harbi, director of the human resources center at JCCI.
“I believe that our king embodies two important elements that should be inherent in each president or king. These elements are smartness and kindness. His kindness pushed him to use his smartness and create Hafiz to support the unemployed,” said Al-Harbi.
Al-Harbi said Liqaat is the second step after Hafiz. Liqaat received about 9,000 applications from jobless Saudis with different levels of academic performance.
“Hence, we hired so far 5,000 Saudis because of Liqaat. The offered salaries are between SR3,000 to SR5,000.”
Nora Al-Asheikh, ex-director of the supervision office of the Ministry of Social Affairs in Jeddah, said King Abdullah’s generosity is behind the idea of Hafiz.
“Launching Hafiz and many other programs is the best proof of the King’s smart generosity. When we think deeply about Hafiz, we discover that it is a program that helps unemployed financially. In addition, the Ministry of Labor pushed private and governmental companies to gather and set the amount of vacancies to hire Saudis with salaries not less than SR3,000 a month,” she said.
Arab News spoke to a number of Hafiz beneficiaries who claimed the initiative changed their lives and increased their enthusiasm to look for jobs. “Our king has a very kind heart and refuses to see Saudis suffering like citizens from other nationalities. Such an initiative proved his willingness to be a fair judge over the Saudi population,” said Abdulaziz Al-Ghamdi, an unemployed Saudi who has been looking for a job for two years.
“Launching Hafiz was a necessity as it became too difficult to reduce unemployment by creating public sector jobs. We noticed that last year's revolutions in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and Yemen were blamed by some on high youth unemployment. We are happy and proud to have a king who really cares about his people.”
Widad Al-Khthlan, a Saudi graduate from King Abdulaziz University, said she wished presidents of other countries had the same morals and values as King Abdullah.
“Till today I have never seen such a king who really thinks about the poor and weak before thinking about the rich people,” she said.
“After I graduated from university I was looking for a job for three years, but I didn’t find anything suitable. When King Abdullah launched Hafiz earlier this year, I started receiving the monthly payment. I have been involved in programs launched by JCCI to help me and others to be more qualified and ready to work in the job market.”

 


Tuwaiq Sculpture Symposium opens in Riyadh for the first time

Updated 24 min 55 sec ago
0

Tuwaiq Sculpture Symposium opens in Riyadh for the first time

  • Since their arrival, the international artists have enjoyed tours of the city, including to Al-Masmak Fortress, as well as newer landmarks such as Kingdom Tower
  • The symposium will run until March 22

RIYADH: The first Tuwaiq International Sculpture Symposium kicked off in Riyadh on Monday morning in the capital’s Diplomatic Quarter, featuring the works of 23 artists from 18 different countries.
Participants of note include South Korean sculptor So Dong Choe, Mexican artist Carlos Monge, and Japan’s Yoshin Ogata. The symposium’s three Saudi participants are Ali Al-Toukhais, his nephew Talal Altukhaes, and Mohammad Althagafi.
Altukhaes, an organizer as well as a participant, told Arab News that the goal of the symposium was to create an environment in which artists could share techniques, collaborate with one another, and promote a sense of camaraderie.
The sculptors will assist each other in creating their artworks despite the language barriers between them, but Altukhaes told Arab News that words were not as important as demonstrations of technique, given most of the sculptors would wear ear protection to guard against the constant buzz of heavy machinery anyway.
Since their arrival, the international artists have enjoyed tours of the city, including to Al-Masmak Fortress, as well as newer landmarks such as Kingdom Tower. “Everyone is happy, you can see it in their smiles as they’re working,” Altukhaes said.

New Zealander Anna Korver, covered from head to toe in white dust, grinned as she told Arab News how excited she was to be part of the symposium.
Ogata expressed how happy he was to be in Saudi Arabia for the first time, and that he was enjoying the new experience. “It’s a nice place. The dry climate is a little different to what I’m used to, but the heat is something I’m accustomed to. It’s always a pleasure to work with other sculptors — I usually work alone in my studio back home, so I enjoy seeing everyone here together, and being able to watch them work.”
“It’s my first time in Saudi Arabia, and I was always curious about what it would be like. I had no idea what to expect when I first came, but I’ve been having a great time so far. The symposium is perfect. It is great to work with people who really know what we need as artists — we have all the assistance we need.
“My work is always sort of a narrative about women, and I often like to use the dress form as a symbol of femininity. I’ve chosen to incorporate the hijab into my design. It should give a feeling of lightness when it’s viewed.”
Al-Toukhais, who has had work displayed all over the Arab world, said the secret to becoming an excellent sculptor was patience and commitment. “Sculpting is not for those who are looking for instant gratification, or to become famous overnight. You have to have passion, and drive, but most of all you have to be patient.”
Dr. Fahd bin Mushayt, the executive chairman of the General Authority of the Embassies, thanked the minister of culture, Prince Badr bin Abdullah, for sponsoring the event. In a statement to the Saudi Press Agency, he added that more than 20 masterpieces would be produced by the end of the collaboration.
The symposium will run until March 22.