Arriving late to work, gossiping, making private calls ‘corruption’

Updated 11 November 2014

Arriving late to work, gossiping, making private calls ‘corruption’

The National Anti-Corruption Commission (Nazaha) has issued a raft of new regulations declaring various behaviors at work as corrupt acts including gossiping, making personal calls, reading irrelevant material and not adhering to office hours.
This expands the previous definition of corruption from misuse of funds, forgery and bribery and targets workers at ministries and government agencies. These offenses all carry penalties, the NACC stated recently.
The new NACC definition includes using government vehicles for personal use and creating luxury offices. The Nazaha includes on its list officials taking out advertisements in the media, and hosting events to promote their image or congratulate themselves on work completed. The NACC said that it encourages workers to report whether their managers arrive late for work, or leave early. It also wants managers to report insubordinate workers failing to do their jobs.
The NACC stated that workers are guilty of administrative corruption if they deliberately fail to attend to the needs of the public, such as issuing documents. It is also an act of corruption to reveal confidential information on tenders and contracts.
The NACC stated that it is wrong to use telephones for personal use, and provide jobs for relatives and acquaintances at the expense of qualified citizens. It is also a corrupt act to use one's influence, or wasta, to get things done by bypassing normal procedures.
The NACC said there are severe penalties for these infractions. It intends to monitor government workplaces with regular inspections.


Fraud alert over cryptocurrency falsely linked to Saudi Arabia

Updated 21 August 2019

Fraud alert over cryptocurrency falsely linked to Saudi Arabia

  • The website of a cryptocurrency company is promoting what it calls the CryptoRiyal and SmartRiyal
  • The Singapore-based company uses the Saudi emblem of two crossed swords and a palm tree

JEDDAH: Fraudsters are trying to lure victims into investing in a “virtual currency” with false claims that it is linked to the Saudi riyal and will be used to finance key projects, the Saudi Ministry of Finance warned on Tuesday.

The website of a cryptocurrency company in Singapore is promoting what it calls the CryptoRiyal and SmartRiyal, using the Saudi emblem of two crossed swords and a palm tree. Its “ultimate goal” is to finance NEOM, the smart city and tourist destination being built in the north of the Kingdom, the company claims.

“Any use of the KSA name, national currency or national emblem by any entity for virtual or digital currencies marketing will be subject to legal action by the competent authorities in the Kingdom,” the ministry said on Tuesday.

The fraudsters were exploiting ignorance of how virtual currencies work, cryptocurrency expert Dr. Assad Rizq told Arab News.

“A lot of tricks can be played,” he said. “Some of these companies are not regulated, they have no assets, and even their prospectus is sometimes copied from other projects.

“They hype and pump their project so the price goes up. Inexpert investors, afraid of missing out, jump in, which spikes the price even higher. Then the owners sell up and make tons of money.

“Cryptocurrencies are a risky investment for two reasons. First, the sector is not yet fully regulated and a lot of projects use fake names and identities, such as countries’ names or flags, to manipulate investors.

“Second, you have to do your homework, learn about the technology. And if you still want to invest, consider your country’s rules and regulations.”