Female prisoners regret their trips to the forbidden world

Updated 23 February 2015

Female prisoners regret their trips to the forbidden world

When desires overturn virtues and people turn to evil conduct, human and jinn demons open the doors of temptation and lure victims by presenting them with choices. Moral issues come to the surface until consciousness wakes to a bitter reality and curtains close on a shocking scene and the tears of prisoners.
The women’s prison in Madinah is an example of a correctional facility.
One woman has finished her sentence but she has not seen the light of day but has been transferred to a women’s welfare home because her parents refused to take her back.
“A friend convinced me to run away with her to Jeddah to escape my family’s pressure and my brother’s abuse,” she recalled her story in conversation with a local newspaper. “Without thinking, I went with her but we were soon discovered and we fell into the hands of the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice (Haia) which was watching the apartment where we were. When my father came to get me, he said he would kill me and I was sent to prison and spent six months there. Now I am in the welfare shelter for girls and awaiting forgiveness from my father and brother.”
Another woman says she is an orphan who was raised by a family until she reached 16. They treated her well, but she met bad friends at school who lured her to make mistakes. She used to run away from school and go to a rest area with a boy until they were arrested by the Haia. “They called my adopted family to take me from the police station but they feared for their reputation and so I was taken to detention. I lived in the welfare shelter for girls, but found treatment differed greatly from what I was used to. Everyday there were fights between me and the other girls and supervisors. I decided to leave and met a man who promised to marry me. I used to meet him in one of the markets when I went to study in a computer institute where I went from the welfare home. My errors were discovered because I became pregnant. After investigation, I admitted what had happened but the young man denied all knowledge of me and my unborn child,” she said.
Fatima, another girl, says she is sad and does not want to go back to her family because she is responsible for her situation. Her mother is always busy, and her father is with his second wife most of the time. She does not have any brothers or sisters. This pushed her to go a neighbor’s house. Her friend there introduced her to her brother and the relationship developed until the calamity took place and signs of pregnancy started to show.
“I didn’t tell anyone and started to wear large clothes so that no one would notice my swelling belly, but the neighbor’s boy and his sister wouldn’t help me,” she said. “I felt cramps in my stomach so my father took me to hospital where the doctor told him I was having labor pains. My father couldn’t take the shock and fainted; my mother was horrified and she only realized her negligence when it was too late,” she said.
She sent her daughter to the home for orphans after her father wouldn’t allow her to stay at home. Fatima refused to go with her father and went to prison to demand the return of her daughter because she isn’t the only criminal; she feels that everyone else is a criminal too.
Another woman Manal said her mother was the source of her troubles. Since her divorce, the sisters witnessed her nights with her friends and some men. She used to ask the girls to be hostesses during these gatherings until the matter became a reality. After she died, the girls carried on her conduct and could not give it up even though they moved to their father’s house.
“We used to make excuses to go to imaginary celebrations and spend the night at hotels with our friends. One day, I went with a man to his house and a fight broke out between him and his friend who was with us. Matters got out of hand and they started to fight and the man’s mother called the police. I couldn’t escape and was arrested. My father refused to take me back and told my uncle to take me to his village, because he feared for my sister, but he didn’t know that she was already on the same path,” she added.


First pilgrims leave under Eyab initiative

Updated 18 August 2019

First pilgrims leave under Eyab initiative

  • Al-Amoudi toured the exhibition dedicated to welcome Eyab’s beneficiaries

Saudi Minister of Transport and Chairman of the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA), Dr. Nabeel Al-Amoudi, oversaw the departure of the first 

group of pilgrims under the Eyab initiative on Saturday together with GACA President Abdulhadi bin Ahmed Al-Mansouri.

Eyab seeks to improve services provided to pilgrims, with the authority aiming to enrich pilgrims’ experience at the Kingdom’s airports. It is expected to benefit 30,000 pilgrims during this year’s Hajj season.

Al-Amoudi toured the exhibition dedicated to welcome Eyab’s beneficiaries, inspected the services available and received a briefing from the initiative’s officials.

GACA started an experimental implementation of Eyab this year, aimed at pilgrims returning to Indonesia, India and Malaysia through Jeddah’s King Abdul Aziz International Airport and Madinah’s Prince Mohammed bin Abdul Aziz Airport.