Senior scholars defend KSA’s Islamic laws

Updated 22 March 2015

Senior scholars defend KSA’s Islamic laws

The Council of Senior Scholars has defended the Kingdom’s judiciary, saying it is based on Islamic law and guarantees the rights of all people.
Sheikh Fahad bin Saad Al-Majed, secretary general of the council, said that Saudi Arabia is the center of the Islam world. “The Kingdom is proud of its Islamic laws, which protects human rights, dignity and private property.”
Al-Majed said the country is “a beacon of light” for Muslims worldwide, with millions arriving every year for Haj and Umrah. The attacks on Islamic law only served to strengthen the country, making it more determined to cling to the religion, under the leadership of Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman, the crown prince and deputy crown prince, he said.
Meanwhile, the Foreign Minister of Djibouti has denounced Sweden’s recent statements against Saudi Arabia, considering them an act of aggression against Muslims worldwide.
The ambassador of Djibouti in the Kingdom, Diyaa Al-Din Bakharma, said that his country stands by the Kingdom in this matter. He said the attack on Saudi Arabia, widely considered the “cradle of Islam” targets all Muslims. These statements interfered in the Kingdom’s internal affairs, and could possibly contravene international law, he said.
Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom last week criticized Saudi Arabia’s judicial system over a case involving a Saudi blogger convicted of insulting Islam. There has been widespread anger in the Kingdom over her comments.


Ukrainian pianist hits the high notes for Taif visitors

Updated 30 min 7 sec ago

Ukrainian pianist hits the high notes for Taif visitors

TAIF: It is not unusual for musicians to aim for the stars, but organizers of the Crown Prince Camel Festival in Taif gave the Ukrainian concert pianist Olina Lukashu a head start.

Visitors to the opening entertainment events at King Faisal Garden were treated to the sight and sound of Lukashu performing 5 meters in the air, dressed in a long white gown that reached down to the ground.

“It was decided to put her at the entrance of the garden, all dressed in white to welcome the visitors,” festival spokesman Saleh Al-Anzi told Arab News.

“It is a new idea that was greatly enjoyed by visitors, who admired her rendition of various musical pieces.”

Among the 25 events taking place in conjunction with this year’s festival is a circus presented by five Latin American countries, Al-Anzi said. There is also a free childcare service, mobile food courts, international restaurants and a live broadcasting studio.  “Visitors will be able to ride camels inside the park, and enjoy the handicrafts on display by various artisans,” he said.

Dr. Sami bin Abdullah Al-Obaidi, chairman of the Council of Saudi Chambers, told Arab News the Taif Season was important in terms of generating employment opportunities for young Saudis, and creating tourist projects. “All the events are full of visitors,” he said.

He said 2,000 jobs were provided during the Taif Season, and those who took up the opportunities gained skills and knowledge about the requirements of an audience.

“Saudi culture has changed, and Saudis have become more aware of global challenges and requirements, and the expectations of tourists and other consumers,” he said. “Taif Season has set a high standard.”