96 border villages being demolished

Updated 06 April 2015
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96 border villages being demolished

Authorities have decided to demolish 96 deserted border villages to prevent their use by infiltrators from Yemen. Ten villages have already been demolished since Operation Decisive Storm was launched on March 26.
A local newspaper quoted Hassan Aqeeli, the Border Guard commander in the Al-Harith region of Jazan, as saying that the move was to prevent the empty houses turning into safe havens for traffickers and infiltrators.
“These deserted structures are regarded as a safe shelter for smugglers and infiltrators,” he said.
The 15,000 inhabitants of this particular area were resettled following a 2009-2010 conflict that saw Houthis cross into the Kingdom from Yemen.
Border Guard officers are conducting daily inspection campaigns and security checks on all houses located on the border.
Bulldozers are racing to remove the buildings along the border, under the close and continuous follow-up of border patrols and security forces.
Aqeeli said the border villages became ghost towns after the residents were evacuated in 2010.
Following a failed attempt by Houthis to infiltrate the border in 2009, Saudi Arabia implemented a wider security buffer zone along its border with Yemen.
The process involved removing whole villages and compensating residents with residential units under the King Abdullah Housing Project in Jazan.


FaceOf: Adam Sieminski, president of KSA's King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center

Updated 6 min 39 sec ago
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FaceOf: Adam Sieminski, president of KSA's King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center

  • Sieminski holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and a master’s degree in public administration from Cornell University, New York
  • Sieminski was also a member of the advisory board of the Global Energy and Environment Initiative at School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University

Adam Sieminski has been president of the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center (KAPSARC) since April 2018. 

In 2008, KAPSARC was founded as an independent research institute to advance the understanding of the energy sector and its impact on the global economy. The center also conducts studies on sustainable energy options. Before joining KAPSARC, Sieminski held the James R. Schlesinger Chair for Energy and Geopolitics at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) for over a year.

Before that, he served as a non-resident senior adviser to the CSIS Energy and National Security Program. He also served as the administrator of the US Energy Information Administration between 2012 and 2017.

He was also the senior director for energy and environment on the staff of the US National Security Council and a senior fellow and former president of the US Association for Energy Economics. 

He was also a member of the advisory board of the Global Energy and Environment Initiative at School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. He also served as the chairman of the Supply-Demand Committee of the Independent Petroleum Association of America.

From 2005 to 2012, Sieminski was the chief energy economist for Deutsche Bank. 

Sieminski holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and a master’s degree in public administration from Cornell University, New York. He is also a Chartered Financial Analyst. 

On Sunday, KAPSARC signed a memorandum of understanding with the Gulf Cooperation Council Interconnection Authority on the sidelines of Saudi Arabia Smart Grid and Sustainable Energy Conference and Exhibition that concluded in Jeddah recently. The MoU aims to strengthen research partnership in the power sector to enhance the efficiency of the electricity markets in the GCC countries.