Jeddah metro to eliminate 30% of traffic movement

Updated 18 August 2015

Jeddah metro to eliminate 30% of traffic movement

JEDDAH: Come 2022, vehicular traffic flow in Jeddah is expected to get smoother when a metro system becomes operational.

The system will consist of light trains such as trams operating along the Corniche, and the Al-Dawai train. The metro will also be serving the Al-Muntalaq Station, which will also be connected to the Haramain train providing Jeddah residents a seamless route to Makkah.

The project is estimated to cost SR45 billion and is expected to transport 30% of the city’s commuters by 2040. Jeddah’s population, placed at 4.082 million in 2015 in the population estimates of the Central Department of Statistics & Information, is expected to reach 6.2 million by 2033. 

Dr. Osama Abda, executive director of the Jeddah Metro Company, told the local media that the first phase of the project will be tendered this year and the rest in 2016.

The French Sistra Company has been nominated for consultation on engineering designs for the project. The company is in the process of reviewing the city’s current and future development plans. Abda said the metro will consist of four lines colored red, blue, green and orange for reference.
The metro will be a stepping-stone for the city’s future development of public transportation, which includes the Corniche tram, light trains along Palestine and Prince Mohammad bin Abdulziz Streets (Al-Tahliya) and fast buses alongside King Fahad and Al-Harra Street.
"The goal of the public transportation project in Jeddah is to provide the best and most suitable types and choices for public transportation, in addition to the easy use of car parks that are connected to public transportation paths on the city's borders, to decrease traffic congestions inside the city and lessen pollution," Abda said.


Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

Updated 19 August 2019

Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

  • One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020
  • A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia is to set up arts academies, including two in the next two years, offering a step toward academic qualification and enlarging the Kingdom’s footprint in heritage, arts and crafts, and music.

The initiative is part of the Ministry of Culture’s Quality of Life program. 

The minister, Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Farhan, said investment in “capacity building” was one of the most important elements in encouraging the cultural sector, which enjoyed unlimited support from King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The Kingdom was rich in diverse arts, talents and artistic production, Prince Badr said, and the academies would be a first step toward academic qualification in the arts within the Kingdom.

One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020, targeting 1,000 students and trainees in long- and short-term programs. 

A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021.

The music academy in particular will be “the core of music production and talent development in Saudi Arabia,” Saudi musician, composer and producer Mamdouh Saif told Arab News.

The music industry was a large and diverse field, Saif said, and education was crucial. 

“The academy is the right place to launch the music industry in Saudi Arabia, and it will have a significant impact on Saudi youth, and young people in surrounding countries,” he said.

He expects “a very high turnout” for the academy among young Saudis. 

“Due to my expertise in this area, I receive many questions from people who want to learn music, but through private lessons,” he said.

“But the availability of an academy for this purpose, that teaches music in a methodological way, will be the right start for those interested in music.”