Malaysia football fans held for rioting, attacking Saudis

Updated 10 September 2015
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Malaysia football fans held for rioting, attacking Saudis

JEDDAH: Eleven Malaysian fans have been arrested for rioting and attacks on at least two Saudi football fans on Tuesday night in Malaysia.
According to reports, the Malaysian police are searching for other suspects who were involved in throwing flares onto the pitch when their team trailed Saudi Arabia 2-1. Officials eventually called off the 2018 World Cup and 2019 Asian Cup qualifier.
The fans were apparently venting their anger over the Malaysian team’s humiliating 10-0 defeat to the United Arab Emirates last week. Players looked on as smoke billowed up from the flares.
The Hong Kong referee ended the game three minutes before the final whistle and ordered the players to return to their dressing rooms. Witnesses said that the stadium, 25 km from Kuala Lumpur, looked like a “war zone.” There were scenes of fans throwing plastic chairs at security officers. According to reports, the head of Shah Alam police refused to comment on the arrests. He said that the police were trying to determine how the bombs were smuggled into the stadium.
He said that the police were not notified that any of the Saudi team’s fans were hurt, but said an ambassador whom he did not name, informed him of this situation.
According to reports in the Malaysian press, fans from the host nation attacked Saudi fans inside and outside the stadium. In addition, a 23-year-old Yemeni student studying in Malaysia said that he suffered leg injuries as he tried to escape his attackers.
Another fan, Mohammed Abu Obeidah, said that guards told him the situation was under control but he found stick-wielding Malaysian fans waiting to assault him and others outside the stadium.


US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

Updated 18 November 2018
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US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

  • A US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case
  • ‘The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts’

JEDDAH: The US government denied on Saturday it had reached a final conclusion over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi after a US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case. 
“Recent reports indicating that the US government has made a final conclusion are inaccurate,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said.
“There remain numerous unanswered questions with respect to the murder of Mr. Khashoggi. The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts,” she said.
“In the meantime, we will continue to consult Congress, and work with other nations to hold accountable those involved in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi.”

But President Donald Trump told reporters on Saturday that his administration would get “a very full report,” including who was responsible for Khashoggi’s death, on Monday or Tuesday.
The Washington Post published an article citing anonymous sources, who it says are close to the CIA which suggests the Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman ordered the killing — something Saudi Arabia vehemently denies.
The Kingdom’s public prosecutor on Thursday released details of its investigation, saying the decision to kill the journalist was made by the head of a rogue mission during an attempt to repatriate him. The prosecutor is seeking the death penalty for five of the suspects. 
On Saturday, Donald Trump spoke with CIA Director Gina Haspel and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from Air Force One, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. 
Trump praised US relations with Saudi Arabia when he was asked about the case. Saudi Arabia is “a truly spectacular ally in terms of jobs and economic development,” the US president said.
Earlier, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US Prince Khalid bin Salman, strongly denied the Washington Post story, and said he did not tell Khashoggi to go to Turkey, as the report claimed. 
“I never talked to him by phone and certainly never suggested he go to Turkey for any reason. I ask the US government to release any information regarding this claim,” Prince Khalid said
Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States, was a columnist for the Post.
He was killed on Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after he went to get marriage documents.