Crashed crane came from Germany, and not China

Updated 15 September 2015
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Crashed crane came from Germany, and not China

JEDDAH: The ill-fated crane that crashed in the Grand Mosque in Makkah on Friday claiming 111 lives was made in Ehingen, Germany.

This demolishes rumors on social media in the immediate aftermath of the tragedy that it was made in China.
Responding to questions from Arab News on Monday, Kristian Kueppers, corporate communications chief at the Liebherr Group, said his company was extremely saddened by the tragic accident and the fatalities and injuries, and sent its deepest sympathy to the families of the victims.
He said there are approximately 30 cranes of this type in operation worldwide. “The most powerful crawler crane in the world of conventional design is our LR 13000,” he said.
“There can be different reasons for the collapse of a crane," he said. “To provide a conclusive statement on the part of Liebherr is impossible at the moment. We do not want to indulge in any guessing. We want to wait for the results of the official investigations.”
On whether such cranes are geared to stand in fierce weather, Kueppers said: “There are clear instructions in the manual on how to secure a crane under different weather conditions.”
On the duration required to assemble such a crane at a project site, he said: “It depends on the configuration and the expertise of the team.”
There have been umpteen photographs in the media showing the Liebherr crane with its base tipped forward and its superstructure leaning into the mosque where it struck.
On Monday, a team of engineers from Saudi Binladin Group was cutting through the machine to disassemble it. Engineers said it would take six days to remove it.
Cranes are mostly yellow and the general assumption was that the red-colored ones are from China and yellow from Germany.
However, Kueppers clarified that “there was no special significance to any particular color.”


Sakani program to add 11,000 homes in Jeddah

The Housing Ministry has deals with two real-estate companies. (Reuters/File)
Updated 18 October 2018
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Sakani program to add 11,000 homes in Jeddah

  • The first project, Rawabi Hijaz, is on private-sector land and will includes 9,502 units
  • The Ministry stressed its keenness to work with qualified developers to add to housing stock

JEDDAH: The Saudi Ministry of Housing has signed agreements with two real-estate development companies to add more than 11,000 homes in Jeddah for the Sakani program. The deals were signed on October 15 during an event announcing the program’s 10th batch of beneficiaries.
The first project, Rawabi Hijaz, is on private-sector land and will includes 9,502 units, while the second, Jeddah airport housing, is on land owned by the Ministry and will includes 2,203 units.
The agreements were signed in the presence of Minister of Housing Majid bin Abdullah Al-Hugail, National Housing Company CEO Mohammed bin Saleh Al-Bati, and officials from the ministry and the Real Estate Development Fund. They follow previous agreements signed by the Ministry of Housing with a number of developers to build housing in various regions of the Kingdom. Sixty projects providing more than 90,000 diverse homes, with prices ranging from SR250,000 to SR750,000 have already been launched.
The Ministry stressed its keenness to work with qualified developers to add to housing stock and support supply in the sector, to encourage competition between companies to meet the needs of citizens in a way that suits local markets and ensures the provision of continued maintenance services for the residential units.
“The real-estate developers with whom we signed contribute along with the Ministry to the service of citizens in order to provide a suitable residential environment on the levels of prices and specifications, while presenting the beneficiaries with the guarantees needed,” the Ministry said.
“These projects will be completed and handed over to the beneficiaries within a period not exceeding three years. These housing projects are integrated in terms of services and public facilities. They include mosques, public parks and green areas as well as government buildings.”