Women outnumber men in getting scholarships

Updated 28 December 2015
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Women outnumber men in getting scholarships

RIYADH : Female students outnumber their male counterparts in the pursuit of higher studies in the government's foreign scholarship program. According to statistics released recently by the Ministry of Education (MoE), Saudi female students constituted 62.3 percent of the foreign scholarship program, exceeding male students by 12.9 percent between 1431 and 1435 AH.

The statistics further showed that the number of students increased substantially between 1431 and 1435 from 106,095 to 152,032.
The number of students pursuing bachelor's program abroad has increased from 4,397 students in 1431 to 80,786 in 1435. The number of students pursuing a master's degree abroad registered a substantial growth with the total number rising from 22,408 students in 1431 to 33,455 students at present.
The number of students pursuing doctoral degrees also
doubled from 5,026 students in 1431 to 10,323 in 1435.
According to data available up to 1435, the students enrolled in undergraduate courses accounted for 58.8 percent, MBA students accounted for 24.4 percent and those at doctoral level accounted for 7.5 percent while the rest are distributed among language learners and students pursuing diploma courses.
Medicine, engineering, business administration, management and law are popular disciplines among students pursuing higher studies abroad in response to the expanding labor market and ongoing rapid economic development.
The countries popular among students were the United States, the UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Malaysia, France and Germany.
A Saudi woman must be accompanied by a mahram (a legal guardian) who travels and stays with her until the completion of her studies.
Launched in 2005, the foreign scholarship program is the largest such program in the history of the Kingdom with students studying at premier institutions around the world.
All students sponsored under the scholarship program are provided benefits during their study period abroad which include full tuition, academic supervision, monthly stipend for living expenses, full medical and dental insurance, annual round-trip tickets and financial incentives for a high GPA. Dependents of students receive the same benefits.


Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, said Saudi Arabia's foreign minister. (AFP)
Updated 45 min 59 sec ago
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Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

  • Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, says Saudi FM
  • Al-Jubeir: Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict

RIYADH: The Saudi-led coalition is working with UN envoy Martin Griffith to reach a political solution to the conflict in Yemen based on UN Security Council resolution 2216, the Gulf Initiative and the outcomes of Yemeni national dialogue, the Saudi foreign minister said on Thursday. 

“Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, and the solution should lead to the restoration of legitimacy in Yemen,” said Adel Al-Jubeir.

“We support a peaceful solution in Yemen. We support the efforts of the UN envoy for the Yemeni cause,” he added.

“We are committed to providing all humanitarian support to our brothers there. We are also working on the post-war reconstruction of Yemen.” The Kingdom supports the envoy’s efforts to hold negotiations at the end of November, added Al-Jubeir.

Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict, he said.

In contrast, Houthi militias are imposing restrictions on Yemeni cities and villages, leading to starvation, he added. 

They are also seizing humanitarian aid and preventing Yemenis from getting cholera vaccinations, Al-Jubeir said. 

The Houthis fire ballistic missiles indiscriminately at Saudi Arabia, use children as fighters and plant mines across Yemen, he added. 

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, he said.

Saudi Arabia did not want the conflict in Yemen; it was imposed on the Kingdom, Al-Jubeir added. 

Saudi Arabia worked with other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states to develop the Gulf Initiative. 

This led to a transition from former President Ali Abdullah Saleh to the internationally recognized government headed by current President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.

The Kingdom also worked to develop Yemeni national dialogue that led to a Yemeni vision regarding the country’s future.

A new Yemeni constitution was about to be drafted when the Houthis seized much of the country, including the capital. 

Yemen’s legitimate government requested support, and the Saudi-led coalition responded under Article 51 of the UN Charter.