SR 45 bn Jeddah transport system to redefine mobility

Updated 13 March 2013
0

SR 45 bn Jeddah transport system to redefine mobility

JEDDAH: A massive public transport system covering roads, railways and seaways will be implemented in Jeddah within seven years. The Cabinet yesterday approved the SR 45 billion project that will bring about a dramatic improvement in people’s mobility.
Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal thanked Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah for sanctioning the project. “I would like to congratulate the people of Jeddah for this project that will contribute to its development and reduce traffic bottlenecks,” he said.
A high-level committee, chaired by Prince Khaled, will supervise implementation of the project, which includes tram systems, bus transport network, marine transport, a trolley transport system for the Corniche, a big public transport station and a suspended bridge in Obhur.
The Transport Ministry has completed 30 percent of the project’s designs, the governor said, adding that Jeddah Mayoralty would prepare the remaining designs. A company would be established to implement the project as quickly as possible.
There will be three tram systems. The 67-km Orange Line with 22 stations will start from Makkah Road, pass by the city center and end at Obhur. It will branch out to east via Sari Street.
The 24-km Blue Line with 17 stations will start from King Abdulaziz Airport and end at Haramain Railway Station. The 17-km Green Line with seven stations will start from the Corniche, pass by Palestine Street and Old Airport to reach Haramain Railway.
“There will be 208 carriages in the three tram systems,” said Jeddah Mayor Dr. Hani Aburas, adding that the project would cost SR 45 billion. The new road transport system will have 816 buses with 2,950 stations covering a total area of 750 km.
The marine transport system will have 10 stations.
The Cabinet had earlier approved similar projects for Riyadh and Makkah involving huge capital investments.
“This is great news for Jeddawis,” said Ahmed Al-Sheikah, a member of the National Industrial Committee. He called for expanding the railway system to the industrial city to facilitate transport of workers and products.
“We should also expand the marine transport system to connect Jeddah, Rabigh, Qunfuda, Al-Laith, Tuwal, and other coastal cities,” he told Arab News.


Steps taken to meet growing demand for Muslim holy water

Updated 20 min 23 sec ago
0

Steps taken to meet growing demand for Muslim holy water

  • Saudi government takes special measures to ensure uninterrupted supply of the water to the Two Holy Mosques
  • Zamzam water is drawn from a 30-meter well in the basement of the Grand Mosque in Makkah

JEDDAH: The very mention of the word “Zamzam” evokes a feeling of awe in the hearts of the faithful. Zamzam water is considered holy in Islam. 

It is found in a 30 meter well in the basement of the Grand Mosque in Makkah, about 20 meters east of the Kaaba. The water is believed to possess healing qualities, and is treated with reverence by all Muslims.

The Saudi government takes special measures to ensure there is an uninterrupted supply of the water to the Two Holy Mosques all year round, and to pilgrims during the Hajj and Umrah seasons.

In addition to the King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz Zamzam Water Project, the Zamzam bottling plant operates with a separate mission under the United Office of Zamazemah in Makkah.

Zamzam water is produced by the King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz Zamzam Water Project, which is operated by the National Water Co., and whose new bottling plant can produce up to 30,000 liters per hour.

The construction of the new plant began in 2014. Originally consisting of two production lines, a third was added in 2017, which massively increased production capacity. With the water being dispensed into 200 milliliter bottles, it means that the plant can produce well in excess of 150,000 bottles per hour. 

The bottles are then distributed to pilgrims upon arrival in Makkah, and, under the Zamzam Water Additional Services program, are also made available near the central area of Makkah’s Grand Mosque and in other holy places, such as Mina and Arafat. 

Two further expansion phases are currently underway at the site, which also houses its administrative center, including the management and marketing departments.

Two weeks ago, meanwhile, the Saudi Shoura Council approved a new project proposal by Arbab Al-Tawaif Establishments. The project will aim to enhance the competence of employees in Hajj and Umrah services. 

It will also look to restructure Arbab Al-Tawaif, and transform its establishments from individual institutions into companies, working to ensure they provide better standards of service to pilgrims from outside Saudi Arabia.