Albury triumphs in Riyadh Wheelers cycle event

Updated 24 March 2016
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Albury triumphs in Riyadh Wheelers cycle event

RIYADH: The major event of the Riyadh Wheelers season, the 100km road race was held at the weekend on a cool and breezy morning to the east of the city. The Wheelers’ major sponsor, ITEA International Ltd, again stepped up and provided prizes to the winners in all categories including the top three.
Brothers Edoardo and Luigi Lando from ITEA, also competed in the event and revealed their passion for cycling.
After a short race brief from soon to be retiring Chairman Rob Patrick, 55 riders were sent on their way on the first of 6 laps of a tough circuit.
The first 10km was enjoyed at tempo pace, during which Rodel Flores made his now trademark attack, so it was left to Chad Albury to make the first serious move followed by young Saudi Omar Al Jarallah, who was not able to live with the pace the Bahamas International rider was setting. Behind a chase pack of around 20 riders formed, which reduced with each passing lap.

Going into the final lap, the chasers had still not reeled in Albury, so a sprint for second looked inevitable, with Gareth Gallagher, Tom Dzurilla, Thierry Mathy and Kris Ahlin keeping the pace high which further reduced the numbers, including some of the feared sprinters.
Albury was already savoring his victory as the final kilometer approached for the chasers, riding into a strong head wind and also uphill, a perfect setting for the stronger ëpunchyí rider. Right on cue, Club Champion Mathy attacked and made no mistake holding off a late challenge from Ahmed Al Qumizi, who in turn held off Ahlin, Tomas Van Dop, Gallagher, Jeff Roetter, Patrick, Dzurillz and Geron Guanlao.

RESULTS:
1 Chad Albury; 2 Thierry Mathy; 3 Ahmed Al Qumizi; 4 Kris Ahlin; 5 Thomas Van Dop; 6 Gareth Gallagher; 7 Jeff Roetter; 8 Rob Patrick; 9 Tomas Dzurilla; 10 Geron Guanlao; 11 Graham Bell; 12 John Adams; 13 Bruno Syfrig; 14 Bryan Dimacali; 15 Rida Qahaali; 16 Lars Olvein; 17 Jiri Kuba ; 18 Greg Wilson; 19 Ralf Chan; 20 David McNamara; 21 Kevin Walsh; 22 Roy Delos Santos; 23 Sylvain Girardeau; 24 Sergey Yurchenko; 25 Jaime Sunga; 26 Gordon Lawrie; 27 William Tolentino; 28 Jose Altavas; 29 Patrick Can Daele; 30 Percival Soliman; 31 Yezith Forero; 32 Abdulmahsin Alhashim; 33 Edoardo Lando; 34 Jessie Javier; 35 Ahmed Hamidalddin; 36 Thomas Brackmann; 37 Rurik Santos; W-1 Veronique Mathy; 38 Jeffrey Portem; 39 Bernard Detomal; 40 Sergey Yurchenko; 41 Richard Mendoza; 42 Benedict Ella; 43 Luigi Lando.

Categories:

Open: Tomas van Dop.
Veteran: Kris Ahlin
Master: John Adams
Senior: Rob Patrick
CAT B: Vero Mathy


Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

Updated 14 November 2018
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Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

LONDON: A Saudi Arabian businessman is driving the bid to get squash included in the Olympics for the first time.
The World Squash Federation has petitioned three times for squash to join the Games, but each bid has been rejected by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The decision has prompted frustration in the squash community, particularly as sports such as climbing, surfing and skateboarding have been admitted.
Ziad Al-Turki is the Chairman of the Professional Squash Association (PSA) and has done wonders in marketing the game and broadening its appeal. He is now pushing hard for the game to be showcased on the biggest stage of all at the 2024 Olympics Games in Paris.
Squash has huge global appeal, with the men’s singles final in the last Commonwealth Games attracting a TV audience of more than one million.
“Everyone’s ultimate goal is the Olympics,” said Al-Turki. “The main push comes from the World Squash Federation (WSF) and for many years they were stuck in their ways. We changed a lot at the PSA and ticked every box with the IOC. The WSF just stayed stagnant and didn’t do anything. They didn’t want to put our hand in their hand and work together.”
Relations between the PSA and the WSF came to a head in 2015 in the wake of squash losing out to wrestling for a spot at the 2020 Olympics. A statement from the PSA described the then president of WSF, Narayana Ramachandran, as an “embarrassment to the sport.”
“Nothing could happen with the president of the WSF. Nothing would change. It was just a one-man show. We tried to help but he wouldn’t accept any help,” Al-Turki said. “We have a new president now and they are all very keen,” he added.
Jacques Fontaine is the new president and at his coronation in 2016 he encouragingly said “the Olympic agenda remains a priority.”
“The WSF love the sport and they understand the needs of the IOC,” said Al-Turki.
“They understand the PSA is at a completely different level to the WSF and we’ve now joined forces and are working together. Hopefully 2024 will be the year squash is in the Olympics. Right now, the way we are working together is the strongest collaboration ever and hopefully we can tick all the boxes for the IOC.
“We ticked all the right bodies as a professional association but the WSF didn’t. Now they are putting their hands in ours and we will tick all the right boxes for the ICO.”
Al-Turki, once described as the Bernie Ecclestone of squash, has certainly transformed the sport since he took up office in 2008.
“When I joined the PSA we didn’t have any media coverage,” he said. “Right now we are live in 154 countries. the women’s tour has just grown stronger and stronger — the income has gone up by 74 percent.
“I just love the squash players. I think they are incredible athletes are are some of the fittest athletes in the world. I felt they deserved better and I wanted them to have better.
“I don’t think we’ll be able to reach the levels of football and tennis in terms of exposure and prize money, but I want to reach a level where they will retire comfortably. It’s one of the fastest growing sports in the world right now.
“It’s all about the player and their well being. Nick Matthew retired recently and I think he’s retired comfortably. I think I’ve contributed to this as the income has improved. That’s all I want – nothing more.”