Jamia Markaz to celebrate its 37th anniversary

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Updated 17 December 2014
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Jamia Markaz to celebrate its 37th anniversary

Jamia Markaz, South Asia’s largest Islamic center celebrates its 37th anniversary from Dec. 18-21. M. A. Abdul Qadir Musliyar, President, Muslim Educational Board of India, will inaugurate the four-day long celebrations at Markaz campus, Kozhikode. The conference will be attended by Muslim scholars from Europe, Africa and America, apart from Asian countries. Sheikh Mathar Al-Ka’abi, director, Islamic Affairs UAE, will inaugurate the concluding session on Dec.21 evening. It’s expected that one million believers from India and abroad will attend the concluding session.
The conference will feature discussions and workshops on various issues pertaining to Muslim communities in South Asia. This includes Qur’an and Dawa conferences, a debate on minority education and a seminar on Muslim charity. Sheikh Zayed international peace conference and the international Muslim scholars summit are the central attraction of this year’s anniversary celebration. The peace conference will discuss the role of religious institutions in maintaining a peaceful society. Kerala Chief Minister Ommen Chandy will inaugurate the conference. Religious and diplomatic figures from various Arab-Islam countries will present papers. The International Muslim Scholars Summit will be attended by influential Islamic scholars from across the globe. The summit will discuss the role of Ulemas in the contemporary Muslim society and will form new strategies to combat radical trends among Muslim communities.
Ministers, Parliament and Legislative assembly members from different states of India will address the audience in various sessions. 

Markaz, is a unique educational experiment initiated in 1978 under the leadership of Sheikh Aboobacker Ahmed, General Secretary, All India Sunni Jam-e-yathul Ulema and one of the most influential Muslim scholars in the Islamic world. It introduced a syllabus, which combines both religious and secular education Muslim students. This experiment was the first one of its kind in India. Various educational institutions under Jamia Markaz provide education for minority students from primary to post graduate level. Muslim society in Kerala is currently the most literate among world Muslim communities and Markaz’s educational initiatives played a great role in achieving this by setting up educational institutions in the most remote and backward areas of the region. 

Presently, more than 7,00,000 students pursue their education in 97 institutes functioning under Jamia Markaz in various Indian states including 18,000 students in the main campus. Kashmiri Home in the main campus is an institute set up to rehabilitate students from Jammu Kashmir including border areas. This institute was set up at the request of Jammu Kashmir state government in 2004. Presently 150 Kashmiri students are studying at this institute.


UK Conservatives to pick final 2 contenders for prime minister

Updated 10 min 12 sec ago
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UK Conservatives to pick final 2 contenders for prime minister

  • Tory lawmakers will vote to eliminate two contenders from a four-strong field
  • All the candidates are vowing to lead Britain out of the European Union, a challenge that defeated outgoing Prime Minister Theresa May

LONDON: Britain’s governing Conservatives were set to pick two candidates Thursday who will square off to become the country’s next prime minister.
Tory lawmakers will vote to eliminate two contenders from a four-strong field that includes ex-foreign minister and London mayor Boris Johnson, current Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, Environment Secretary Michael Gove and Home Secretary Sajid Javid.
Johnson has a commanding lead after three rounds of voting that cut the list from an initial 10 contenders. The three others are battling to join him in a runoff to be decided by 160,000 Conservative Party members nationwide.
All the candidates are vowing to lead Britain out of the European Union, a challenge that defeated outgoing Prime Minister Theresa May. She quit as Conservative leader earlier this month after failing to win Parliament’s backing for her Brexit deal.
The winner of the contest, due to be announced the week of July 22, will become Conservative leader and prime minister.
Many in the party doubt that anyone can beat Johnson, a quick-witted, Latin-spouting extrovert admired for his ability to connect with voters, but mistrusted for his erratic performance, and record of inaccurate and sometimes offensive comments.
Hunt is considered an experienced and competent minister, but unexciting. Gove is the sharpest performer and could come out best in head-to-head debates with Johnson, his longstanding frenemy. The two men led the “leave” campaign Britain’s 2016 EU membership referendum, but later fell out.
Javid, the son of Pakistani immigrants, says he offers a common-man alternative to private school-educated rivals like Johnson and Hunt, although he was a highly paid investment banker before entering politics.
Brexit, originally scheduled to take place on March 29, has been postponed twice amid political deadlock in London. The candidates differ on how they plan to end the impasse.
Johnson has won backing from the party’s die-hard Brexiteers by insisting the UK must leave the bloc on the rescheduled date of Oct. 31, with or without a divorce deal to smooth the way.
Javid, like Johnson, says he would try to leave the EU without an agreement rather than delay Brexit beyond Oct. 31. Gove and Hunt both say they would seek another postponement if needed to secure a deal, but only for a short time.
Critics say none of the candidates’ plans is realistic.
The EU is adamant that it won’t reopen the Brexit agreement it struck with May’s government, which has been rejected three times by Britain’s Parliament. Many economists and businesses warn that leaving without a deal on divorce terms and future relations would cause economic turmoil as tariffs and other disruptions are imposed on trade between Britain and the EU.
UK Treasury chief Philip Hammond warned Thursday that a no-deal Brexit would put Britain’s prosperity at risk and leave the economy “permanently smaller.”
“The question to the candidates is not ‘What is your plan?’ but ‘What is your plan B?’ Hammond said in extracts from a speech he is giving later in the day.”