Respect religions, marchers in Philippines tell Charlie Hebdo

Updated 14 January 2015
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Respect religions, marchers in Philippines tell Charlie Hebdo

MANILA: Around 1,500 people protested in one of the Philippines’ cities on Wednesday against the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, police said.
Local politicians, teenaged students and women with veils covering their faces packed the main square in Marawi in the southern Philippines, some raising their fists in the air as a Charlie Hebdo poster was burned.
“What had happened in France, the Charlie Hebdo killing, is a moral lesson for the world to respect any kind of religion, especially the religion of Islam,” organizers said in a statement released during the three-hour rally.
“Freedom of expression does not extend to insulting the noble and the greatest Prophet of Allah.”
A group calling itself “Boses ng Masa,” or Voice of the Masses organized the rally, which attracted about 1,500 people, Marawi police officer Esmail Biso told AFP.
He said non-government organizations behind the group.
Twelve people including eight Charlie Hebdo cartoonists and journalists and two police officers were killed last week after militants struck the magazine’s Paris office, in an attack that has sparked outrage worldwide.
The attacks triggered giant rallies in support of Charlie Hebdo’s victims and the right to publish images of reverent figures.
The protest in the Philippines was one of first reported worldwide since the violence to express outrage at Charlie Hebdo.
The protesters carried streamers in with the words “You are Charlie” written in French, in response to the “I am Charlie” cry of those who condemned the attack.
One of the streamers read: “France must apologize,” while another read: “You mock our prophet, now you want an apology?”
Muslims are a minority in the Philippines, with most living in remote southern regions they regard as their ancestral homeland.


Quake kills at least 11, 24 missing in northern Philippines

Rescue workers carry a survivor out of the collapsed Chuzon supermarket in Porac, pampanga province on April 23, 2019, a day after a 6.3 magnitude quake. (AFP)
Updated 23 April 2019
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Quake kills at least 11, 24 missing in northern Philippines

  • The Philippines is part of the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire’

PORAC, Philippines: Rescuers found more bodies overnight in the rubble of a supermarket that crashed down in a powerful earthquake that damaged buildings and an airport in the northern Philippines, raising the death toll to 11, officials said Tuesday.
The bodies of four victims were pulled from Chuzon Supermarket and three other villagers died due to collapsed house walls, said Mayor Condralito dela Cruz of Porac town in Pampanga province, north of Manila.
An Associated Press photographer saw seven people, including at least one dead, being pulled out by rescuers from the pile of concrete, twisted metal and wood overnight. Red Cross volunteers, army troops, police and villagers used four cranes, crow bars and sniffer dogs to look for the missing, some of whom were still yelling for help Monday night.
Authorities inserted a large orange tube into the rubble to blow in oxygen in the hope of helping people still pinned there to breathe. On Tuesday morning, rescuers pulled out a man alive, sparking cheers and applause.
“We’re all very happy, many clapped their hands in relief because we’re still finding survivors after several hours,” Porac Councilor Maynard Lapid told The Associated Press by telephone from the scene, adding another victim was expected to be pulled out alive soon.
Pampanga Gov. Lilia Pineda said at least 10 people died in her province, including those who perished in hard-hit Porac town. The 6.1-magnitude quake damaged many houses, concrete roads, bridges, Roman Catholic churches and an international airport terminal at Clark Freeport, a former American air base, in Pampanga. Another child died in nearby Zambales province, officials said.
At least 24 people remained missing in the rice-growing agricultural region, mostly in the rubble of the collapsed supermarket in Porac, while 81 others were injured, according to the government’s disaster-response agency.
The four-story building housing the supermarket crashed down when the quake shook Pampanga as well as several other provinces and the capital, Manila, on the main northern island of Luzon. The quake was caused by movement in a local fault at a depth of 12 kilometers (8 miles) near the northwestern town of Castillejos in Zambales province, said Renato Solidum, who heads the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology.
More than 400 aftershocks have been recorded, mostly unfelt.
The US Geological Survey’s preliminary estimate is that more than 49 million people were exposed to some shaking from the earthquake, with more than 14 million people likely to feel moderate shaking or more.
Clark airport was closed temporarily because of damaged check-in counters, ceilings and parts of the departure area, airport official Jaime Melo said, adding that seven people were slightly injured and more than 100 flights were canceled.
In Manila, thousands of office workers dashed out of buildings in panic, some wearing hard hats, and residents ran out of houses as the ground shook. Many described the ground movement like sea waves.
One of the world’s most disaster-prone countries, the Philippines has frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions because it lies on the so-called Pacific “Ring of Fire,” a seismically active arc of volcanos and fault lines in the Pacific Basin.
A magnitude 7.7 quake killed nearly 2,000 people in the northern Philippines in 1990.