Vinod Mehta, editor of India's Outlook magazine, dies at 73

Updated 08 March 2015
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Vinod Mehta, editor of India's Outlook magazine, dies at 73

NEW DELHI: Vinod Mehta, founding editor of India's Outlook magazine and a fearless and irreverent commentator on Indian politics, died Sunday. He was 73.
Mehta died of multiple organ failure at New Delhi's All India Institute of Medical Sciences, said hospital spokesman Amit Gupta.
In a career spanning four decades, Mehta launched several newspapers and magazines.
But he was best known for his trenchant editorial columns on politics and the shenanigans of Indian politicians.
Mehta was born in the city of Rawalpindi in 1942. He spent his childhood in Lucknow.
In 2011, he published his best-selling memoirs, "Lucknow Boy," followed a couple of years later by "Editor Unplugged."
Mehta was the founding editor of newspapers such as the Sunday Observer, the Indian Post, The Independent and the Delhi edition of The Pioneer.
In 1995, he founded Outlook, a weekly news and views magazine.
He was a popular commentator on television chat shows, well known for his fiercely independent views.
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted: "Frank & direct in his opinions, Vinod Mehta will be remembered as a fine journalist & writer. Condolences to his family on his demise."


Mueller Report: Russia did attempt to meddle in 2016 US election, no evidence of US coordination

Updated 14 min 36 sec ago
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Mueller Report: Russia did attempt to meddle in 2016 US election, no evidence of US coordination

WASHINGTON: US Attorney General William Barr said on Thursday that the Mueller Report confirms the Russian government sought to meddle in the 2016 US presidential election, but that no evidence was found that any American conspired or coordinated with the Russian government.

While Mueller drew no conclusion about whether President Donald Trump had obstructed justice in the investigation, Barr said he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein personally had concluded that while Trump was "frustrated and angry" about the Mueller probe, nothing the president did rose to the level of an "obstruction-of-justice offense," Barr said

Mueller's report examined 10 episodes pertaining to Trump and obstruction.

Barr said the president did not exert executive privilege to withhold anything in the report. And he said the president's personal attorney had requested and gotten a chance to review the report before its public release.

The Justice Department was to release a redacted version of the special counsel's report later Thursday on Russian election interference and the Trump campaign, opening up months, if not years, of fights over what the document means in a deeply divided country.