Tourists throng to the Saudi Arabian city of Najran for bird’s eye views of the valley

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Panoramic views of the villages and their oases from the summit Raum mountain in Najran, Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
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Panoramic views of the villages and their oases from the summit Raum mountain in Najran, Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
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Panoramic views of the villages and their oases from the summit Raum mountain in Najran, Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
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Panoramic views of the villages and their oases from the summit Raum mountain in Najran, Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
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Panoramic views of the villages and their oases from the summit Raum mountain in Najran, Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
Updated 01 September 2018

Tourists throng to the Saudi Arabian city of Najran for bird’s eye views of the valley

JEDDAH: The Raum mountain, with an ancient fortress perched on top, is the latest in a series of major attractions drawing tourists to Najran, a city in southwestern Saudi Arabia near the border with Yemen.
The 1,000-meter high geographical jewel provides a bird’s eye view of the city and houses a castle decorated with distinctive shapes and patterns to reflect the history of the region, its civilization and ancient architecture.
Below the castle are newly-constructed reservoirs to stock up water during the rainy season.
The fortress, which is also an archaeological site, is surrounded by a large external wall built of square stones and adorned with shielding balconies. It has five rooms, a roof made of palm wood and a winding staircase.
Mount Raum is located to the south of the Najran valley facing the Abu Hamdan mountain — the highest mountain in the region — and runs parallel to the Wadi Najran watercourse.
It holds strategic and historical significance attracting tourists and explorers looking to document the area overlooking the heritage villages of Al-Hudhun, Al Qabil, and Djerba.


5th Misk Global Forum brings innovators together

Photo/SPA
Updated 12 min 16 sec ago

5th Misk Global Forum brings innovators together

  • This year’s special edition of MGF is focusing on ‘the Ripple Effect’

RIYADH: The fifth edition of the Misk Global Forum (MGF) began on Monday.
The MGF brings together new and established innovators, creators and thinkers from around the world to share insights, discuss issues and enable young people to gain actionable skills. Due to the pandemic, this year’s annual gathering is mainly taking place online.
Shaima Hamidaddin, the MGF executive manager, said: “The pandemic has swept over us as a tidal wave of change, but there is momentum to build a more engaged, more sustainable, and more balanced future.”
“This year’s special edition of MGF is focusing on ‘the Ripple Effect.’ It’s about how our daily actions amplify each other so that ripples spread out from community to community, country to country, continent to continent to become waves of change around the world,” she said.
Other speakers during day one of the MGF included Alain Dehaze, the Adecco Group’s CEO and Marco Lambertini, director general of WWF International, Switzerland.