Public prosecution explains penalties for fertility and surrogacy procedures in Saudi Arabia

Improper in vitro fertilization is a crime punishable by law. (Shutterstock)
Updated 29 January 2019
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Public prosecution explains penalties for fertility and surrogacy procedures in Saudi Arabia

  • Violators will be jailed for up to five years or fined SR5 million ($1.3 million)

JEDDAH: Surrogacy, improper in vitro fertilization and unauthorized gender reassignment measures are all punishable by law, announced the Kingdom’s Public Prosecution on its official Twitter account.
Perpetrators of these crimes will face fines of between SR200,000 ($53,300) and SR500,000 or up to five years in prison, in addition to having their operating or medical licenses revoked.
Improper in vitro fertilization includes sperm injection from ex-husbands or donors other than spouses.
The provisions were made in accordance with Saudi laws pertaining to fertilization, utero-fetal and infertility treatment.
The Public Prosecution also warned against environmental crimes, such as bringing hazardous, poisonous or radioactive waste into the Kingdom.
Authorities have stipulated that companies in charge of producing, processing, storing or recycling hazardous material are obliged to dispose of such forms of waste in accordance with environmental regulations.
Violators will be jailed for up to five years or fined SR5 million ($1.3 million). In addition, their plants will be temporarily closed or their vessels temporarily confiscated for up to 90 days. Repeat offenders will incur double the penalties.
In addition, violators will incur the costs of removing the waste and repairing the damage caused.


Dr. Iman bint Habas Al-Mutairi, new CEO of Saudi National Competitiveness Center

Updated 19 September 2019

Dr. Iman bint Habas Al-Mutairi, new CEO of Saudi National Competitiveness Center

Dr. Iman bint Habas Al-Mutairi is the newly appointed CEO of the National Competitiveness Center (NCC).

Al-Mutairi received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from King Faisal University in 1992. In 1997, she obtained a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Bristol, UK.

She began her career as a lecturer in the chemistry department of King Faisal University, from 1993 to 1994, before lecturing at the University of Bristol for three years.

In 1998, she became an assistant professor of human genetics at Harvard University, and two years later she joined Perkin Elmer as a scientific research consultant in biological sciences in the US until 2002.

A year later, she joined Hospital Aramco as a preventive medicine consultant. She then headed the department of public medical relations, and served as an acting director of the department of medical technical support services, and the head of quality and patient safety from 2007 to 2010.

With Saudi Aramco, she headed the manpower planning and analysis department for a year, before she became the project manager of the Aramco Accelerated Strategic Transformation Program from 2011 to 2012.

Al-Mutairi ran her company, Heemah for Business Services between 2014 and 2017.

She also helped with the establishment of the National Competitiveness Center, and coordinated the partnership between Johns Hopkins Hospital and Aramco Healthcare.

In 2017, Al-Mutairi served as an adviser to the minister of commerce and investment.