KSA delivers sacrificial meat to needy people in Gaza

The sacrificial animals were transported from Saudi Arabia to Gaza via 13 trucks.
Updated 13 May 2019

KSA delivers sacrificial meat to needy people in Gaza

Saudi Arabia’s Project For Utilization Of Hajj Meat (Adahi) has announced the shipment of 25,000 sacrificial animals from Makkah to Gaza Strip, Palestine.
The animals were transported via 13 trucks, which started on the first day of Ramadan and traveled about 1,000 km toward the strip.
Adahi enables pilgrims and Umrah performers to pay the value of Hajj meat and almsgiving under the agreement concluded between Saudi Post and the Islamic Development Bank.
The move to allocate a part of the sacrificed animals to beneficiaries in the Gaza Strip is in line with the Kingdom’s continued support to the Palestinians.
President of the Islamic Development Bank Group and Head of Adahi Dr. Bandar Hajjjar said the allocation of 25,000 sacrificed animals for distribution in the Gaza Strip has been done in coordination with the Palestinian Ministry of Endowments and Religious Affairs. He said all necessary measures and precautions have been taken to ensure that the safety and freshness of the meat is preserved upon its arrival in Gaza.
“We have coordinated with the competent authorities in Egypt to facilitate the transport and delivery of Adahi meat through the port of Duba and Safaga toward the Rafah Border Crossing on the Palestinian side,” Dr. Hajjar added.
The meat, which is expected to reach half a million needy people in the strip, is in 10 kg packages, each of which will be received by one beneficiary family.
The meat is distributed to the needy and the poor of the Holy Mosque and the surplus is transferred to poor Muslims in 27 countries.
In 2000, the Adahi project was developed, with over 40,000 employees working in different fields such as management, supervision, slaughtering, shipping and distribution. Every year, 30,000 lambs, cows and camels are slaughtered to be distributed to 30 million poor people and refugees in different countries in Asia and Africa.


Clinical trials to accelerate adoption of new drug treatments in Saudi Arabia

Updated 27 May 2020

Clinical trials to accelerate adoption of new drug treatments in Saudi Arabia

  • Trials are being led locally as an essential means to verify the safety and effectiveness of a new drug
  • Eli Lilly has a major role to play during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic

RIYADH: Clinical trials in Saudi Arabia could speed up the adoption of new drugs locally, a pharmaceutical executive has told Arab News.

“Clinical trials have two very big benefits for the Kingdom. Firstly, they provide data in the long run with respect to safety and efficacy, catered specifically to the Saudi population. Secondly, they impact local investment and build healthcare capabilities,” Managing Director of Eli Lilly Dimitri Livadas said..

Lividas further explained that the clinical trial phase of any new treatment is crucial as it represents the stage between the adoption or rejection of a drug. Working with the Ministry of Health and with a presence in the Kingdom for 42 years, the pharmaceutical company began research trials in the country in 2016, consisting of five pre-marketing activities and three monitoring studies for post-marketing.

Lividas added that the trials are being led locally as an essential means to verify the safety and effectiveness of a new drug before it is put to the market and introduced to patients. The majority of these are focused on diabetes, oncology, immunology, and osteoporosis.

“We genuinely believe that our future is here in Saudi Arabia. We continue to make great progress in having a commercial organization in the Kingdom that is fully staffed by Saudi nationals,” said Lividas.

As a biopharmaceutical company, Eli Lilly has a major role to play during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. It recently announced partnership with AbCellera to develop a treatment for the virus and aims to enter into clinical trials this year.

“I salute the Saudi authorities for their strong measures to contain the spread of COVID-19. I think it is an example to the world on how to do this. I would like to also express my gratitude toward all healthcare professionals who are currently on the frontlines, risking their own health to help others," Lividas said.