Saudi Arabia joins G20 women’s empowerment initiative

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Saudi women are seen at the first automotive showroom solely dedicated for women in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia January 11, 2018. (REUTERS)
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Saudi women check out cars at an automotive exhibition for women in the Saudi capital Riyadh on May 13, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 30 June 2019

Saudi Arabia joins G20 women’s empowerment initiative

  • The initiative aims to reduce the gap between male and female pay by a quarter in the next seven years

OSAKA: Saudi Arabia joined an initiative on women’s empowerment at the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan. 
The Kingdom signed a pledge to promote participation in the workforce, enhance education and stimulate involvement in the small to medium business sector. 
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced the initiative under the motto “women are able to shine,” on the closing day of the summit. He said: “The G20 members will make a united effort to promote women’s empowerment. I believe that these efforts will be a driving force for further development of the G20 as a whole.”
Saudi Arabia is one of the members of the “troika” that organizes the W20 offshoot to promote female participation in economics and politics.
Queen Maxima of the Netherlands, the UN’s special advocate for inclusive finance, said: “I want to thank the troika, Argentina, Japan and Saudi Arabia, for supporting this important initiative to promote inclusive economic growth for women.”

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The initiative aims to reduce the gap between male and female pay by a quarter in the next seven years.

She said that if women were employed in the global workforce at the same rate as men, it could add $28 trillion to the global GDP by 2025.
The initiative aims to reduce the gap between male and female pay by a quarter in the next seven years. 
It also hopes to guarantee access to education for all women in the world for at least 12 years. Japan is paying to educate 4 million girls in developing countries for the next three years.
The initiative will also seek to support female small businesses via the Women Entrepreneurs Finance Initiative (We-Fi) launched by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and US President Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka Trump.


Oman, UAE praise Saudi Arabia for reaching a deal between Yemeni parties

Updated 4 min 25 sec ago

Oman, UAE praise Saudi Arabia for reaching a deal between Yemeni parties

  • Gulf countries praise Saudi Arabia’s role in brokering the Riyadh Agreement.
  • The deal ends a feud between the government and the STC and refocuses efforts on fighting the Houthi militia

RIYADH: Oman welcomed on Tuesday Saudi Arabia’s efforts in bringing together the Yemeni government and southern separatists to sign a power sharing agreement. 
The two parties signed the Saudi-brokered deal in Riyadh last week to end a power struggle in the country’s south. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman hailed the agreement as a step toward a wider political solution to the Yemen conflict.
Oman’s foreign ministry said it “hopes the agreement will pave the way for a comprehensive settlement in Yemen.”
Saudi Arabia’s Deputy Defense Minister, Prince Khalid bin Salman, visited Oman on Monday and met Sultan Qaboos bin Said.
The UAE Cabinet also welcomed on Tuesday the signing of the agreement and expressed confidence that it will establish a “new era of unified and effective work to meet the aspirations of the Yemeni people.”
“The Cabinet affirmed the UAE’s support for all efforts exerted by Saudi Arabia, through its leadership of the Arab Coalition, in order to stabilize Yemen and allow it to regain it role in the region,” the state WAM news agency reported.
The new arrangement calls for an equal number of ministries between the Southern Transitional Council (STC) and the government of President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi.
The Kuwaiti Cabinet also welcomed the Riyadh Agreement on Monday and thanked Saudi Arabia for its efforts.
Yemen’s government was forced to flee the capital Sanaa when Houthi militants and their allies seized the city in 2014. 
The government and the STC are part of a military coalition against the Iran-backed Houthis, which also includes Saudi Arabia and the UAE.