Saudi scholarships: An investment in the nation’s future

Saudi Scholarship students with Saudi officials during an event at the Saudi Embassy in Washington D.C. (SPA file photo)
Updated 22 July 2019

Saudi scholarships: An investment in the nation’s future

  • Kingdom provides financial assistance and fully paid tuition to all who qualify for scholarship
  • Many of the current recipients of scholarships are third-generation beneficiaries of the policy

JEDDAH: In an age when it is regarded as both essential and expensive, Saudi Arabia’s scholarship program provides a world-class education, ensuring financial assistance and paid tuition to all those who qualify. 

Beneficiaries of the program study abroad, returning with degrees and skills needed for the Kingdom’s development into a modern society.

In 1928, King Abdul Aziz Al-Saud ordered the first batch of students to be sent on scholarships to Egypt. A total of 14 went to complete their education in medicine, agriculture, engineering and law.

It was a crucial time for the young Kingdom, and the students contributed towards building the formative nation. Many became ministers, councillors, ambassadors and engineers in top positions, helping establish ministries and forming Saudi government entities.

The early Kingdom understood the importance of education as a vehicle for national development. Today, Saudi Arabia is among the leading countries measured by annual expenditure on education, with an impressive SR193 billion ($51.4 billion) allocated for Vision 2030 initiatives, as well as projects across the Kingdom, in 2019.

Success stories abound: Abdullah Tariki, the first Saudi oil minister appointed by King Saud and a co-founder of OPEC, graduated from Cairo University and later obtained his master’s degree in petroleum engineering from the University of Texas.

The first Saudi woman to obtain a government scholarship was Dr. Thoraya Obaid in 1963, who served as executive director of the United Nations Population Fund and undersecretary-general of the UN from 2000-2010. Success stories like these paved the way for other Saudi women to pursue higher education in the US, UK, Egypt and Lebanon and become prominent names in their fields, both within the Kingdom and abroad.

Many of the latest recipients of Saudi scholarships are third-generation beneficiaries, following in the footsteps of their parents and grandparents.

With the launch of the King Abdullah Scholarship Program in 2005, droves of Saudi students began to explore new avenues of education beyond just the West and Middle East. As of 2018, more than 90,000 Saudi students study abroad. Of these, 850 are at the world’s top 10 universities, and 1,600 are medical residents and fellows.


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KSRelief launches prosthetics' center in Taiz

Updated 23 January 2020

KSRelief launches prosthetics' center in Taiz

TAIZ: The King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) on Wednesday launched an artificial limb center in Taiz, Yemen, providing high-quality prosthetics for up to 600 patients.

Abdulqawi Al-Mikhlafi, who is the deputy governor of Taiz, expressed his appreciation for the Kingdom’s generous support to Yemen across all sectors over the past few years, particularly in the areas of health, the environment and development.

Al-Mikhlafi said such efforts helped local authorities to deal with the many challenges they faced in providing comprehensive services to needy Yemenis.

He added that the Kingdom’s support reflected the deep historical and cultural ties between the people of Yemen and Saudi Arabia, and he praised the Kingdom for standing by the country and its government for more than 50 years.

Dr. Elan Abdul Haq, deputy governor of Taiz for health affairs, thanked KSRelief for its continued support for Taiz and Yemen, assistance he said had alleviated the suffering of millions of Yemenis during the ongoing conflict.

The head of the Artificial Limbs Center, Mansour Al-Wazei, announced that the center would begin receiving patients soon, providing vital aid to amputees for whom prosthetics meant regaining the ability to live full and productive lives.