Swords and daggers on display wow visitors at Souk Okaz

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The traditional weapon-making industry is an important part of the tourism sector. (SPA)
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The traditional weapon-making industry is an important part of the tourism sector. (SPA)
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The traditional weapon-making industry is an important part of the tourism sector. (SPA)
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The traditional weapon-making industry is an important part of the tourism sector. (SPA)
Updated 28 August 2019
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Swords and daggers on display wow visitors at Souk Okaz

  • Prices vary according to the level of manufacturing, with modern weapons featuring elaborate designs and inlays featuring rare and expensive materials, and often being made to order

TAIF: Souk Okaz, this year part of Taif Season, features more than 10 shops showcasing traditional swords and daggers, giving visitors more information about these famous historic weapons and how they are made. Formerly instruments of war, in modern times swords and daggers are used in popular games, traditional displays, and on special occasions such as wedding ceremonies as a source of pride.
Weapon makers regularly exhibit their craft at festivals and events such as Souk Okaz, where they are a popular attraction.
Descended from primitive implements made from such materials as stone, wood and bone, weapons evolved as civilization advanced and favored metals such as copper, bronze, iron, steel, and featuring gold and silver. Today’s swords and daggers are made by skilled craftsmen who have often inherited the profession from their fathers and grandfathers.
Prices vary according to the level of manufacturing, with modern weapons featuring elaborate designs and inlays featuring rare and expensive materials, and often being made to order.
The traditional weapon-making industry is an important part of the tourism sector, with visitors to Saudi Arabia considering it one of the country’s most important handicrafts, and it is an important economic contributor to the Kingdom.


Mike Pompeo lands in Jeddah for talks with Saudi officials on Aramco attacks

Updated 4 sec ago

Mike Pompeo lands in Jeddah for talks with Saudi officials on Aramco attacks

  • Pompeo described the drone and cruise missile strikes on Saturday as an 'Iranian attack'
  • Pompeo was met at Jeddah airport by Saudi Foreign Minister Ibrahim Al-Assaf. 

JEDDAH: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Wednesday described strikes on key Saudi oil installations as an “act of war” as he landed in Jeddah.

Pompeo described the drone and cruise missile strikes on Saturday as an “Iranian attack”.

He said it had not come from Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi militants and that there was no evidence the attacks had been launched from Iraq.

Pompeo was met at Jeddah airport by Saudi Foreign Minister Ibrahim Al-Assaf. 

Earlier on Wednesday, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he had spoken with US President Donald Trump about the Aramco attack, and agreed that Iran must not be allowed to acquire a nuclear weapon.