Uber Eats gets new general manager in Saudi Arabia

Assad Numan, general manager in Saudi Arabia, Uber Eats.
Updated 03 September 2019

Uber Eats gets new general manager in Saudi Arabia

Uber has announced the appointment of Assad Numan as the new general manager for Uber Eats operations in Saudi Arabia. Following the launch of Uber Eats in Riyadh, Jeddah and Dammam, Numan will be leading the next phase of expansions and developments across the Kingdom. 

Based in Riyadh and overseeing operations across the Kingdom, Numan’s role will focus on further diversifying Uber Eats’ selection of restaurants, while ensuring the company best delivers on the brand promise and offers app users a fast and reliable delivery experience.

Damien Drap, general manager of Uber Eats in the GCC, said: “With his 15 years of experience in operational management, e-commerce and marketing in Saudi Arabia, we are thrilled that Assad is taking charge in one of Uber Eats’ fastest-growing markets within the Middle East and North Africa region. We are confident that he will help grow our footprint, bringing Uber Eats to all corners of the Kingdom.” 

Commenting on his new appointment, Numan said: “Uber Eats is thriving in one of the most competitive markets in the region for food delivery and I’m honored to be tasked with leading the team amid an ever increasing dynamic food scene in the Kingdom. Saudi is a primary market for us, with a thriving food culture, and we are committed to expanding our footprint by providing a reliable service that brings food lovers their favorite meals all across the Kingdom. ” 

Prior to joining Uber Eats, Numan was the country head of marketing and e-commerce business at Samsung Electronics Saudi Arabia, and holds a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in Dhahran. 

Uber Eats is available today in three major cities: Riyadh, Jeddah and Dammam. At the push of a button, Uber Eats offers foodies a variety of dishes spanning cuisines from across the world. In Saudi Arabia, Uber Eats has signed with more than 2,500 restaurants and is looking to expand and grow across all major cities in the Kingdom.


Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

An international team of KAUST researchers studied whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for ‘Rope Reef’), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea on the Saudi Arabian coast.
Updated 18 November 2019

Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), whale sharks are considered endangered, which means the species has suffered a population decline of more than 50 percent in the past three generations. The whale shark is only two classifications from being extinct. Improvements and conservation efforts are in place, but there is still a long way to
go to protect these gentle underwater giants.
An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency using a combination of three scientific techniques: Visual census, acoustic monitoring and satellite telemetry.
Their six-year study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, tracked long-term whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for “Rope Reef”), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea. The team monitored a total of 84 different sharks over a six-year period, and their results shed light on whale shark behaviors,
which could help to inform conservation efforts.
“The study takes years of passive acoustic monitoring data and combines it with previously published visual census and satellite telemetry data from the same individual sharks. The combined dataset is used to characterize the aggregation’s seasonality, spatial distribution, and patterns of dispersal,” said Dr. Michael Berumen, director of the Red Sea Research Center and professor of marine science at KAUST.

HIGHLIGHT

An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency.

They found the aggregation to be highly seasonal, with sharks being most abundant in April and May, and that many of the sharks returned to the hot spot regularly year after year. The study also shows roughly equal numbers of male and female sharks using the site, something that could be unique to Shib Habil. These characteristics indicate that this site may serve an important function for the wider Indian Ocean population of this rare and endangered species.
“Using the combined dataset, we can show somewhat conclusively that the aggregation meets all of the criteria of a shark nursery. This is particularly relevant given that Shib Habil is the only site in the Indian Ocean to regularly attract large numbers of juvenile females. Growing late-stage adolescents of both sexes into full adulthood is critical for sustaining a species. Management of critical habitats like Shib Habil and other aggregations will likely be vital for future whale shark conservation,” said KAUST graduate Dr. Jesse Cochran, lead author of the study.
There is a combination of factors contributing to the decrease of whale shark populations world-wide, including targeted fishing, bycatch losses due to fisheries, vessel strikes from boat traffic, marine debris, and pollution.