Queen Rania, J-WEL take on refugee education

Held under the patronage of Queen Rania Al-Abdullah, the meeting was chaired by Hassan Jameel, Community Jameel president, and Kevin Watkins, Save the Children UK CEO.
Updated 24 September 2019

Queen Rania, J-WEL take on refugee education

The Queen Rania Foundation for Education and Development (QRF), Save the Children and the MIT Abdul Latif Jameel World Education Lab (J-WEL) convened a high-level meeting on refugee education in Amman on Sept. 9, addressing one of the critical humanitarian issues born out of the global refugee crisis.

Held under the patronage of Queen Rania Al-Abdullah, the meeting brought together philanthropists, business leaders, donor institutions and international and regional development organizations, and was chaired by Hassan Jameel, Community Jameel president, and Kevin Watkins, Save the Children UK chief executive. 

The Amman meeting followed a high-level roundtable held at the World Economic Forum in Davos in January 2019, which Queen Rania also attended, and which was chaired by Jameel and Helle Thorning Schmidt, then chief executive of Save the Children International and former prime minister of Denmark. The meeting was also part of the buildup to the Global Refugee Forum, which will be held in Geneva in December by UNHCR.

Speaking at the roundtable, Jameel said: “At Community Jameel, we recognize the importance of education. By supporting teachers’ well-being, in conjunction with improving quality teaching practices and student learning, we have the opportunity to re-establish the transformative role of education in vulnerable children’s lives.”

Save the Children UK CEO Watkins said: “Save the Children is celebrating 100 years of humanitarian and development experience and we are delighted to be partnering with such high-level, global philanthropists on this critical agenda.

“Over half of the world’s 25 million refugees are children. If those children were a single country, that country would be the country with the world’s worst education indicators. More than half of the world’s school-aged refugee children — 4 million in total — are out of school.” 

Among the attendees were senior representatives of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the UAE-based Al-Ghurair Foundation for Education, the Saudi-based Alwaleed Philanthropies, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the Islamic Development Bank, the LEGO Foundation, Schmidt Futures, and the World Bank.

Following its initial launch by Queen Rania as an online adult learning platform, Edraak partnered with Google.org and the Jack Ma Foundation to launch a K-12 platform, providing quality Arabic education materials to both children and adults, accessible for free to refugees and others across the region. 

Another program, the Transforming Refugee Education toward Excellence (TREE) initiative, received a major boost with the announcement on Monday that philanthropic organization Dubai Cares had committed $1.5 million to the program.

TREE is an initiative of Save the Children and MIT J-WEL being piloted in Jordan, in partnership with the Ministry of Education and in collaboration with Community Jameel and Dubai Cares. Over a five-year period, it aims to equip Jordanian teachers with skills to deliver effective teaching, and to help students suffering from trauma overcome challenges.


Hyundai launches new i30 N in South Africa

Updated 19 February 2020

Hyundai launches new i30 N in South Africa

Hyundai Motors has increased its presence in South Africa by launching its first mass-produced high-performance car — i30 N — last week in Cape Town. 

The first model of the N brand, the i30 N is Hyundai’s first high-performance car, which has been developed with a key focus on its race-track capability and its ability to be a fun-to-drive everyday sports car. 

“Advanced technology and a high level of driver customization has been built into the i30 N, which means it can play the role of a comfort-oriented commuter as well as a race-track ready performance car,” the automaker said.

The i30 N has a 1,998 cc, four-cylinder turbocharged petrol engine, with its maximum power output of 202 kW reached at 6,000 r/minute, while maximum torque is achieved from 1,500 to 4 700 r/minute. 

The power is delivered to the front wheels of the i30 N through a six-speed manual gearbox and has five different drive modes: Eco, Normal, Sport, N and N Custom, which can be accessed through two dedicated buttons on the car’s steering wheel. 

The i30 N has a rev matching function built-in to adjust the engine revolutions when the driver shifts from a higher to a lower gear, thereby ensuring smooth gear shifting. The dual muffler exhaust sounds add to the pleasure of commanding a high-performance vehicle.

Speaking at the launch, Niall Lynch, CEO of Hyundai Automotive South, said: “The i30 N is one of the most exciting cars Hyundai has made in the recent years highlighting Hyundai’s talented designers and engineers who are always setting new standards.

“It is a high-performance car meant to deliver a fun driving experience and I have no doubt there’s a bright future in store for the Hyundai i30 N in South Africa. It has already been described as a ‘game changer’ with more than 20,000 units sold across Europe since we started trading in 2017.”

The i30 N has stylish 19-inch wheels with 235/35R19 Pirelli P-Zero high-performance tires and red brake callipers featuring the N-logo. Aggressive bumpers with larger air intakes and a red character line, an aerodynamic rear spoiler with a triangular brake light, and a dual muffler exhaust complete the sleek, sporty look.

The i30 N also features the electronically controlled suspension (ECS) and electronically controlled limited-slip differential, which ensures an exhilarating drive with cornering capabilities that befits the i30 N’s hot-hatch character.

Customers can choose from five color options — Polar White, Performance Blue, Micron Grey, Phantom Black and Engine Red.

Hyundai plans to launch the i30 N model in the Middle East toward the end of 2020.