TheFace: Mezna Al-Marzooqi, assistant professor at King Saud University

Mezna Al-Marzooqi (right) and her mother. (AN photo by Ziyad Alarfaj)
Updated 18 October 2019

TheFace: Mezna Al-Marzooqi, assistant professor at King Saud University

I am from a middle-class family; my father was a businessman and my mother taught illiterate adults how to read and write.

I am also a middle child, the third among three sisters and two brothers. My oldest brother died in 2007, and my father passed away a year after that. My mother is the resilient one in the family and she managed to hold us all together. I learned a lot about life and love from my Mama.

She showered us in unconditional love, letting me pursue my education and giving me the freedom to travel.

She is also very enthusiastic about helping others through volunteer work and she expects nothing in return.

One incident that really had a big impact on me was when she supported my uncle with the running of his date factory and brought in low-income families to help them find jobs.

Her passion to help others has inspired me to keep on giving. She is my biggest source of inspiration and I hope one day I can be like her.

My family moved around a lot as I was growing up. I was born in Alkhobar, but we moved to Buqayq and lived on a farm, something my father encouraged as he was very outdoorsy.

When I was in elementary school, I remember regularly walking to my aunt’s house in Alkhobar. She worked for Saudi Aramco, and there were a lot of communities and sports clubs that I joined in with. I have fond memories of attending karate classes with my cousins and getting my yellow belt during my sixth grade.

During high school, we moved to Al-Ahsa, and I later applied to King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh, where I studied medical science and health education.

I then traveled to the US to pursue a master’s degree in public health. I was fortunate enough to be accepted for a six-month training program with the World Health Organization (WHO). Working with a big, multicultural team, I learned a lot, especially from my supervisor.

After gaining my master’s degree, I returned to Saudi Arabia where I was recruited by KSU. I had signed my contract with the university while in America through its program of attracting outstanding professors and researchers.

After teaching for one year at KSU, I went to Australia for four years to do my Ph.D.

I now live in Riyadh working full time as an assistant professor teaching public health in the community health science department at KSU’s applied medical science college.

My research is currently focused on physical activity, especially for female school students and those at college level. One of my projects is aimed at increasing physical activity awareness among small female students and physical literacy, another area I am trying to add to my research. The Kingdom has few women in this field, so I would love to help as many Saudi female researchers as I can.

My family, mother, sisters, brother, niece and nephew remain my top priorities. I believe that life is short so live moments to the full, enjoy life and do all things possible to bring peace to my community.

I am passionate about having harmony with the people around me. Community members may have different attitudes or views, but they all have the same human feelings.

My favorite quote is by Jiddu Krishnamurti (Indian philosopher) who said: “Self-knowledge has no end — you don’t come to an achievement; you don’t come to a conclusion. It is an endless river.”

I have never regretted the career path I’ve taken. I love what I’m doing and am glad to spend my free time engaged in community work and helping others, as my mother has always done. 


Oman, UAE praise Saudi Arabia for reaching a deal between Yemeni parties

Updated 23 min 7 sec ago

Oman, UAE praise Saudi Arabia for reaching a deal between Yemeni parties

  • Gulf countries praise Saudi Arabia’s role in brokering the Riyadh Agreement.
  • The deal ends a feud between the government and the STC and refocuses efforts on fighting the Houthi militia

RIYADH: Oman welcomed on Tuesday Saudi Arabia’s efforts in bringing together the Yemeni government and southern separatists to sign a power sharing agreement. 
The two parties signed the Saudi-brokered deal in Riyadh last week to end a power struggle in the country’s south. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman hailed the agreement as a step toward a wider political solution to the Yemen conflict.
Oman’s foreign ministry said it “hopes the agreement will pave the way for a comprehensive settlement in Yemen.”
Saudi Arabia’s Deputy Defense Minister, Prince Khalid bin Salman, visited Oman on Monday and met Sultan Qaboos bin Said.
The UAE Cabinet also welcomed on Tuesday the signing of the agreement and expressed confidence that it will establish a “new era of unified and effective work to meet the aspirations of the Yemeni people.”
“The Cabinet affirmed the UAE’s support for all efforts exerted by Saudi Arabia, through its leadership of the Arab Coalition, in order to stabilize Yemen and allow it to regain it role in the region,” the state WAM news agency reported.
The new arrangement calls for an equal number of ministries between the Southern Transitional Council (STC) and the government of President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi.
The Kuwaiti Cabinet also welcomed the Riyadh Agreement on Monday and thanked Saudi Arabia for its efforts.
Yemen’s government was forced to flee the capital Sanaa when Houthi militants and their allies seized the city in 2014. 
The government and the STC are part of a military coalition against the Iran-backed Houthis, which also includes Saudi Arabia and the UAE.