Britain investigating whether leaked trade papers were hacked — sources

Laura Alvarez, wife of Britain's opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn, attends a rally where Corbyn is campaigning for the general election in Bangor, north-west Wales on December 8, 2019. Britain will go to the polls on December 12, 2019 to vote in a pre-Christmas general election. (AFP)
Updated 08 December 2019

Britain investigating whether leaked trade papers were hacked — sources

  • Labour Party says the documents showed Conservatives were plotting to sell off parts of the state-run NHS in trade talks with Trump
  • Johnson has repeatedly denied that claim while Trump said last week he would not be interested in the health service

LONDON: British cybersecurity officials are investigating whether classified UK-US trade documents that were shared online ahead of Thursday’s election were acquired by hacking or were leaked, two sources told Reuters.
Beside the fears that Russia could be meddling in another Western election, the disclosure of the classified documents has raised questions about the security of sensitive discussions between the United States and one of its closest allies.
Britain’s opposition Labour Party seized on the documents, saying they showed Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservatives were plotting to sell off parts of the state-run National Health Service (NHS) in trade talks with US President Donald Trump.
Johnson has repeatedly denied that claim while Trump, who in July said the NHS would be on the table in trade talks, said last week he would not be interested in the health service even if it was offered to him by Britain on a “silver platter.”
Britain’s National Cyber Security Center, part of the GCHQ signals intelligence agency, is helping the government to investigate how the documents got into the public domain. It declined to comment on the investigation.
Two sources told Reuters that one of the lines of inquiry was to determine whether or not the documents had been hacked.
“There are clearly indicators to suggest there is more than carelessness or a disgruntled individual behind this,” said one of the sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity due to the sensitive national security nature of the investigation.
A third source said the investigation was looking at whether the documents were leaked from inside the United Kingdom.
Reuters on Dec. 2 reported that the way the documents were first shared on social media site Reddit and then promoted online closely resembled a disinformation campaign uncovered earlier this year.
Reddit said on Friday that the leak was tied to a previous Russian disinformation campaign.
The Kremlin, which says the West is gripped by anti-Russian hysteria, has denied it meddles in Western democracies.


Civilians, soldiers clash leaving 127 dead in South Sudan

Updated 12 August 2020

Civilians, soldiers clash leaving 127 dead in South Sudan

  • The violence in Tonj began after several armed youths got into a disagreement with soldiers
  • An initial armed confrontation was brought under control, but local youths subsequently mobilized for an attack on the army position

JUBA: Clashes between soldiers and civilians during a disarmament exercise in the central South Sudanese town of Tonj have left 127 dead, the army spokesman said Wednesday.
Major General Lul Ruai Koang told AFP that the fighting erupted on Saturday as security forces carried out an operation to disarm civilians in the area which has seen deadly inter-communal clashes.
More than six years after a civil war broke out in the country, and in the absence of a functioning government, many communities are flush with weapons, which they keep for protection or defense against cattle raids.
The violence in Tonj began after several armed youths got into a disagreement with soldiers. An initial armed confrontation was brought under control, but according to Koang the youths mobilized others for an attack on the army position.
“On the latest, the number of those killed, I can confirm to you that it rose to 127,” Koang said, adding that 45 of those killed were security forces and 82 were youths from the area.
A further 32 soldiers were injured.
Koang said two military officers involved in “triggering the clashes” had been arrested, and that the situation in Tonj had calmed down.
South Sudan is emerging from a six-year civil war that left 380,000 dead and millions displaced, and disarmament is a major stumbling block.
Experts have warned against operations that coerce people to lay down their guns without proper planning, as some communities could find themselves unable to protect themselves after their weapons are removed.
“The clashes should be an opportunity to rethink the approach to disarmament. What is the point of removing guns without addressing what drives folks to arms themselves?” Geoffrey Duke, head of the South Sudan Action Network on Small Arms, said on Twitter.
“We can take guns away this week & they buy a new one next week (as) long as they still see the need to have (one).”