Sarah Al-Suhaimi, chairperson of the Saudi Arabian Stock Exchange (Tadawul) 

Sarah Al-Suhaimi
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Updated 09 February 2020

Sarah Al-Suhaimi, chairperson of the Saudi Arabian Stock Exchange (Tadawul) 

The Saudi Arabian Stock Exchange (Tadawul) recently reappointed Sarah Al-Suhaimi as chairwoman for the board of directors for a new three-year term.

Al-Suhaimi has been at the head of Tadawul, the largest stock market in the Middle East, since February 2017 and is the first Saudi woman to hold the position.

She has also been the chief executive officer and a board director of the National Commercial Bank (NCB Capital), also known as Al-Ahli Bank, since March 2014.

She attained her bachelor’s degree in accounting from King Saud University in Riyadh with highest honors, and completed the general management program at Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts, US in 2015.

Prior to her current position, Al-Suhaimi served as the vice chairperson of the advisory committee to the board of the Capital Market Authority between 2013 and 2015.

Al-Suhaimi worked as the chief investment officer at Jadwa Investment, where she led the asset management and wealth management business lines and was also a member of its management committee between 2007 and 2011.

Al-Suhaimi was named one of “50 people to watch” by Bloomberg Businessweek in 2017. It wrote: “The first woman to chair Saudi Arabia’s stock market, she will preside over the exchange with what’s likely to be the world’s most valuable business once Saudi Arabian Oil, the state-run oil company, completes its initial public offering (slated for 2018).”


Saudi authorities arrest coronavirus curfew violator after posting haircut video

Updated 39 min 40 sec ago

Saudi authorities arrest coronavirus curfew violator after posting haircut video

  • Saudi prosecutor warned of legal consequences earlier
  • Violators could be fined up to $796,880 and jailed for up to 5 years

DUBAI: Saudi police arrested a man in Al-Qassim who violated coronavirus regulations by bringing a barber into his home, state news agency SPA reported.
Videos circulating on social media showed the man as he asked a barber to come into his house after authorities temporarily closed down barber shops and salons to curb the spread of COVID-19.
The Saudi public prosecutor has previously warned that anyone posting content on social media, including photos or videos showing curfew violations, or the flouting of any rules enforced to prevent the spread of COVID-19 face prosecution.
In a message posted on Twitter, the bureau said that perpetrators will be charged under Article Six of the Information Crime Prevention Law, which carries a punishment of up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $796,880. 
The punishment will be applied to violators but informers will not be questioned, it added.