Rashed Sharif, executive at Saudi Public Investment Fund

Rashed Sharif
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Updated 14 October 2020

Rashed Sharif, executive at Saudi Public Investment Fund

Rashed Sharif joined the Public Investment Fund (PIF) as head of the Local Holding Investments Division in 2017, and is a member of the PIF management committee and the management investments committee.
He is responsible for shaping the PIF’s investment strategy for local holdings in Saudi Arabia, with the goal of targeting industries to maximize long-term returns, drive economic development, and contribute to the diversification of the Saudi economy. This strategy centers on a number of investment pools, and involves extending support to companies operating across various sectors that the PIF aims to establish as regional and global champions.
The PIF invests in and builds promising new area that enable private sector participation, particularly among small and medium enterprises, with the goal of driving job creation and localization of capabilities.
As a global player, the fund actively engages its vast network to bring select strategic partners to the Kingdom in these new sectors. Through such partnerships, the PIF facilitates the transfer of technology and expertise, subsequently building competitive advantages while bolstering direct foreign investments in Saudi Arabia.
As a key partner to the private sector, the PIF enables companies to compete in regional and global markets. Sharif oversees the deployment of significant capital over a long-term investment horizon to enable the fund to act as a cornerstone investor.
Under his leadership, the Local Holding Investments Division manages an exceptional portfolio of local and regional companies, in addition to a robust pipeline of new investments in various sectors within the Kingdom.

This holistic investment strategy is underpinned by the PIF’s proprietary engagement model for its portfolio companies, “The PIF Way,” which covers five main pillars: Positive governance, full potential plan, operational enablement, network advantage, and scalable infrastructure.
An active advocate for world-class corporate governance practices, Sharif’s role is vital in identifying and capturing opportunities, optimizing capital allocation, and institutionalizing portfolio companies’ governance and performance management frameworks.
Before joining the PIF, Sharif served as CEO of Riyadh Capital, a closed joint-stock company fully operated by Riyad Bank.
Prior to this, he served as the head of the listing department at the Capital Market Authority (CMA) between 2006 to 2013.
In 2006, he held the role of consumer finance relationship manager for the newly established Al-Bilad Bank, where he played a prominent role in establishing its consumer finance policies and procedures.
Earlier in his career, Sharif worked at the Saudi Industrial Development Fund, a government entity that specializes in providing loans to the manufacturing industry.
Rashed holds a master’s degree in business administration from Prince Sultan University in Riyadh, and a bachelor’s degree in finance from King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in Dhahran.
In addition, he participated in the Chase Manhattan Bank Credit Program and the Corporate Finance Modular Program at the London Business School, and is certified in the International Institute for Management Development’s prestigious High-Performance Leadership and High Performance Boards programs


Culture documentation by Saudi ministry to help dispel misconceptions

Updated 22 October 2020

Culture documentation by Saudi ministry to help dispel misconceptions

  • Dia hopes the documenting process will be done professionally and without bias

JEDDAH: Saudi artists welcomed the Ministry of Culture’s first-of-its-kind 16/13 initiative, documenting the diversity of Saudi culture and art through a visual library.
The library will display 16 aspects of culture and heritage through photography and videography that represent the 13 regions of the Kingdom.
Researchers will go around Saudi Arabia to meet creatives, and study their work, for inclusion in the initiative.
“This is an important step for the Kingdom, and it’s a global one to document visual art, whether works of art or cinema,” Dia Aziz Dia, Saudi artist and sculptor, told Arab News.
He added: “It’s important because this creates a database and can be used as a reference to study and compare paintings, photography, sculpting and various types of art, how they differ from one region to the next.”
It could also let government bodies discover art worthy of being put into museums for display, said Dia.
“It’s a good way to document history as well, and to study works of art and the standards of art here,” he said. “It’s on a global level and it’s done everywhere in the world, from England to the US.”
Dia hopes the documenting process will be done professionally and without bias.
He also said it was not easy to compile these works. “It’s an elaborate process to be able to get hold of all the works across the Kingdom. It’s an operation that requires organization, extensive studying and the cooperation of the Society of Culture and Arts and artists as well.”
Saad Tahaitah, documentary filmmaker and photographer, told Arab News that the initiative was promising. He was exposed to it through Saudi photographer Nawaf Al-Shehri, who has been traveling to help with the documentation process.
“The ministry’s been doing an incredible job; they’re (Nawaf and his team) going around the Kingdom and filming content for an actual library,” he said.
Tahaitah has worked on numerous short films on his own to depict the culture and heritage of Asir region, in the southwest of the country. He said he would not trade it for any other place and wished only to film in his hometown.
“I got into documentaries because I wanted honest storytelling. I didn’t want to write a script and hire actors, although that works for some,” he said. “The way I’ve been doing film is to let the person I’m filming go about their day and I let my camera roll.”
Tahaitah started documenting Asir because he wanted to dispel the misconceptions about it, and the stereotypes created through media like “Tash Ma Tash,” the famous Saudi comedy show.
“Asir is full of natural beauty and scenery to capture. It’s diverse in its sights and the people who live in it. Every once in a while, I realize there’s a thing I never noticed before and I film it, and I’ve lived here all my life. The way of life here, simply, can inspire you,” he said.
He added: “We don’t have one particular dance or only sit and dine in a huddle. In a way, I just wanted to showcase the reality of Asir because I love it.”
He said that this initiative could correct inaccuracies shared about certain areas in the Kingdom.