Arab-American entrepreneurs share the secrets of their success 

Clockwise from top left: Farouk Shami, the founder of billion-dollar business Farouk Systems, Rami Kashou, the CEO Rami Kashou Brand, Aneesa Muthana, CEO of Pioneer Service Inc and Manal Saab, CEO of Sorensen Gross Construction Services. (farouk.com/ramikashou.com/pioneerserviceinc.com/Sorensen Gross Construction Services)
Clockwise from top left: Farouk Shami, the founder of billion-dollar business Farouk Systems, Rami Kashou, the CEO Rami Kashou Brand, Aneesa Muthana, CEO of Pioneer Service Inc and Manal Saab, CEO of Sorensen Gross Construction Services. (farouk.com/ramikashou.com/pioneerserviceinc.com/Sorensen Gross Construction Services)
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Updated 04 February 2021

Arab-American entrepreneurs share the secrets of their success 

Clockwise from top left: Farouk Shami, the founder of billion-dollar business Farouk Systems, Rami Kashou, the CEO Rami Kashou Brand, Aneesa Muthana, CEO of Pioneer Service Inc and Manal Saab, CEO of Sorensen Gross Construction Services. (farouk.com/ramikashou.com/pioneerserviceinc.com/Sorensen Gross Construction Services)
  • Arab business leaders were taking part in an online panel discussion hosted by the Arab America Foundation

CHICAGO: The struggles of being an immigrant has helped many successful Arab-American entrepreneurs, a panel of business leaders said on Wednesday during an online panel discussion hosted by the Arab America Foundation.

Participants included business leaders who have appeared on many popular American TV programs including “Shark Tank”, “The Apprentice”, “The Kardashians”, and “Operation Runway.” 

The panel also hosted several high-flying businesswomen who said they had overcome gender imbalances.

All said their success was in part a by-product of the work ethic that their immigrant parents brought to the US, as well their own “passionate drive” to pursue their dreams.

“My parents paved the way for me … even though poverty was common there in Yemen … they came to this country in the 1960s with only a determination to succeed,” said Aneesa Muthana, CEO of Pioneer Service Inc, a women-owned and operated small Chicagoland business providing precision-machined parts since 1990.

“My parents worked very hard. Saved their money. They opened up a manufacturing facility … I learned how to run a company from inside and out.”

Muthana manufactures parts for aerospace industry companies including Tesla, and for ventilators and oxygen equipment, some of which have helped the medical industry cope with the coronavirus pandemic.

“What is our cash-in? My father opened the door for me, but if it wasn’t my passion, I wouldn’t have done well in it. It is easy for us to become successful in this country. This is the land of opportunity.”

Farouk Shami, the founder of billion-dollar business Farouk Systems in Houston, Texas, and a frequent guest on former President Donald Trump’s reality TV show “The Apprentice,” came to the US in 1965 and entered a business that his father opposed and criticized.

“I went into a beauty school and my dad was very upset with it and said he would disown me … it was not a business for a man, my father said,” Shami recalled from his company’s Houston office headquarters.

“I specialized in hair color when hair color was not in fashion. I told my father I would be the best hairdresser in the world.”

Shami said his personal experience pushed him to success: “I was allergic to hair color and my doctor said I should quit, but I experimented and developed hair coloring that was organic.”

Today, Shami has 46 hair patents and his company operates in 150 countries around the world with sales of more than $1 billion.

Rami Kashou, the CEO Rami Kashou Brand, was born in Jerusalem, Palestine before growing up in Ramallah where he learned about fashion and clothing from his mother.

Kashou appeared on the hit TV show “Operation Runway” competing with designers from around the world.

He created fashion designs for Jordan’s Queen Rania and for television reality star Kim Kardashian.

“It starts with my parents, a father who was a self-made businessman who has worn many different hats and who taught me to jump with courage and take risks,” Kashou said.

“And I had a wonderful mother who supported me from a young age, who handed me fabrics through my parents’ travels. I was able to join her with the local seamstress to design her friends’ looks.”

Kashou said that he was inspired to succeed because of the environment of his childhood, in Ramallah under Israel’s military occupation.

“Coming from an atmosphere of apartheid and occupation, and plenty of hours of quarantine under military force, I think that is where at times dreams are born, from the darkest corners of life,” Kashou said.

“The dreams to become a designer came from the lack of childhood space, growing up among jeeps, soldiers, intimidation, violence and occupation. I think the subconscious choice of creativity and design kind of happened as a way of coping with a difficult reality which I lived and endured.”

Kashou studied design in the US and launched his fashion business producing evening wear.

Manal Saab, CEO of Sorensen Gross Construction Services based in Flint, Michigan, provides staffing services to a wide range of industries dominated by men, including automotive manufacturing and construction.

“As a woman in business, the bar has to be set much higher because unfortunately we live in a world where people see a woman, an immigrant, and someone with an accent and they ask, what can she bring to the table?” Saab explained.

“In everything I do I try to build bridges with others who are similar to me.”

Muthana said that being a woman in a male-driven business can be challenging, adding: “When I walk into a room in this industry, I am the only woman. I am the only brown person. And I am definitely the only hijabee.” 

She said she succeeds by defining her own core values and aligning herself with those who share them.

Samy Kobrosly, who co-founded Snacklins, is the son of Tunisian immigrants who settled in Iowa in the 1980s.

A former radio personality and chef, Samy Kobrosly was obsessed with the idea of a meat-free pork rind after joking with a friend about his inability to partake in the classic snack given his Muslim upbringing.

After rounds of experimentation, he landed on a simple recipe of yuca, mushrooms, and onions to create a crunchy, airy, 100 percent vegan and plant-based crisp that resembled a pork rind.

“I am a fan of irony, a person who is a Muslim who made a vegan pork rind … that kind of joke only went so far. Everyone laughs at that, but moving forward, my next job was offering the opportunity to people I saw who did not have that opportunity,” Kobrosly said.

Kobrosly took his product to an episode of “Shark Tank” and won a $250,000 investment from billionaire Mark Cuban to create the 80-calorie, gluten-free, vegan pork-rind puffed chip from simple ingredients.

Saab closed the event: “In order for you to truly succeed, you have to be very passionate about what you are doing. If you love what you do, you never work a day in your life.”


Myanmar police crack down on protests for second day; two dead, several hurt

Myanmar police crack down on protests for second day; two dead, several hurt
Updated 28 February 2021

Myanmar police crack down on protests for second day; two dead, several hurt

Myanmar police crack down on protests for second day; two dead, several hurt
  • Two dead as police crack down
  • UN envoy says he will fight on

Myanmar police shot and killed two protesters on Sunday and wounded several as they cracked down in a bid to end weeks of demonstrations against a Feb. 1 military coup, a doctor and a politician said.
Police opened fire in the town of Dawei, killing one and wounding several, politician Kyaw Min Htike told Reuters from the southern town. The Dawei Watch media outlet also said at least one person was killed and more than a dozen wounded.
Police also fired in the main city of Yangon and one man brought to a hospital with a bullet wound in the chest had died, said a doctor at the hospital who asked not to be identified. The Mizzima media outlet also reported that death.
Police and the spokesman for the ruling military council did not respond to phone calls seeking comment.
Myanmar has been in chaos for a month since the army seized power and detained elected government leader Aung San Suu Kyi and much of her party leadership, alleging fraud in a November election her party won in a landslide.
The coup, which stalled Myanmar’s progress toward democracy after nearly 50 years of military rule, has brought hundreds of thousands of protesters onto the streets and drawn condemnation from Western countries, with some imposing limited sanctions.
In Yangon, several people, some bleeding heavily, were helped away from protests, images posted earlier by media showed.
It was not clear how they were hurt, but media reported live fire. The Myanmar Now media group said people had been “gunned down” but did not elaborate.
Police also threw stun grenades, used tear gas and fired into the air, witnesses said.
Junta leader General Min Aung Hlaing has said authorities have been using minimal force to deal with the protests.
Nevertheless, at least five protesters have died in the turmoil. The army said a policeman has been killed.
The crackdown appears to indicate a determination by the military to impose its authority in the face of widespread defiance, not just on the streets but more broadly in areas such as the civil service, municipal administration, the education and health sectors and media.

’RUNNING’
Police were out early on Sunday, taking positions at main protest sites in Yangon as protesters, many clad in protective gear, began to congregate, witnesses said.
They moved swiftly to break up crowds.
“Police got out of their cars and started throwing stun grenades without warning,” said Hayman May Hninsi, who was with a group of fellow teachers in Yangon. They fled to nearby buildings. “Some teachers got hurt running.”
Doctors and students in white lab coats fled as police threw stun grenades outside a medical school elsewhere in the city, posted video showed.
Police in the second city, Mandalay, fired guns into the air, trapping protesting medical staff in a city hospital, a doctor there said by telephone.
Saturday brought disturbances in towns and cities nationwide as police began their bid to crush the protests with tear gas, stun grenades and by shooting into the air.
State-run MRTV television said more than 470 people had been arrested on Saturday. It said police had given warnings before using stun grenades to disperse people.

’INSTIL FEAR’
Youth activist Esther Ze Naw said people were battling to overcome the fear they had lived with for a long time.
“This fear will only grow if we keep living with it and the people who are creating the fear know that. It’s obvious they’re trying to instil fear in us by making us run and hide,” she said. “We can’t accept that.”
The police action came after state television announced that Myanmar’s UN envoy had been fired for betraying the country after he urged the United Nations to use “any means necessary” to reverse the coup.
MRTV said he had been fired in accordance with civil service rules because he had “betrayed the country” and “abused the power and responsibilities of an ambassador.”
The ambassador, Kyaw Moe Tun, was defiant. “I decided to fight back as long as I can,” he told Reuters in New York.
UN Special Rapporteur Tom Andrews said he was overwhelmed by the ambassador’s “act of courage,” adding on Twitter, “It’s time for the world to answer that courageous call with action.”
Myanmar’s generals have traditionally shrugged off diplomatic pressure. They have promised to hold a new election but not set a date.
Suu Kyi’s party and supporters said the result of the November vote must be respected.
Suu Kyi, 75, spent nearly 15 years under house arrest during military rule. She faces charges of illegally importing six walkie-talkie radios and of violating a natural disaster law by breaching coronavirus protocols.
The next hearing in her case is set for Monday.


US authorizes Johnson & Johnson’s single-shot COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use

US authorizes Johnson & Johnson’s single-shot COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use
Updated 28 February 2021

US authorizes Johnson & Johnson’s single-shot COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use

US authorizes Johnson & Johnson’s single-shot COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use
  • The J&J vaccine is the third to be greenlighted in the US after Pfizer’s and Moderna’s were provisionally approved in December
  • US President Joe Biden hails 'exciting news' but urge Americans not to let guard down

WASHINGTON: The United States on Saturday authorized Johnson & Johnson’s Covid vaccine for emergency use, giving the nation a third shot to battle the outbreak that has killed more than 500,000 Americans.
The single-shot vaccine is highly effective in preventing severe Covid-19, including against newer variants, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said before giving it a green light.
“This is exciting news for all Americans, and an encouraging development in our efforts to bring an end to the crisis,” US President Joe Biden said in a statement.
But he urged Americans to remain vigilant with anti-virus curbs such as social distancing, warning that new variants of the virus still posed a threat.
“But we cannot let our guard down now or assume that victory is inevitable,” he said.
A third vaccine is seen as a vital means to ramp up the immunization rate in the United States, where more than 500,000 people have lost their lives to the coronavirus.
In large clinical trials, the J&J vaccine’s efficacy against severe disease was 85.9 percent in the United States, 81.7 percent in South Africa, and 87.6 percent in Brazil.
Overall, among 39,321 participants across all regions, the efficacy against severe Covid-19 was 85.4 percent, but it fell to 66.1 percent when including moderate forms of the disease.
Crucially, analyses of various demographic groups revealed no marked differences across age, race, or people with underlying conditions.
The J&J vaccine is the third to be greenlighted in the United States after Pfizer’s and Moderna’s were provisionally approved in December.

Practical advantages
Over 65 million people in America have so far received at least one shot of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines — but unlike those, the J&J vaccine requires just one dose, and is stored at fridge temperatures, offering logistical and practical advantages.
The J&J shot appears less protective than Pfizer and Moderna’s two-shot regimens, which both have an efficacy of around 95 percent against all forms of Covid-19 from the classic coronavirus strain.
All three have been shown to fully protect against hospitalizations and death, however.
Nirav Shah, director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, told The Washington Post the two earlier vaccines were tested months before the emergence of “variants of concern” that could affect the efficacy, meaning the Pfizer and Moderna results were not an “apples to apples” comparison with the J&J shot.
There was a hint, based on preliminary data, that the J&J vaccine might be effective against asymptomatic infection — though the company said it needs to do more research.
The company has announced it aims to deliver 20 million doses by the end of March, with 100 million by June — though the US is pushing to expedite that timeline.
The J&J vaccine uses a common-cold causing adenovirus, which has been genetically modified so that it can’t replicate, to carry the gene for a key protein of the coronavirus into human cells.


US Justice Department to appeal judge’s order on eviction moratorium

US Justice Department to appeal judge’s order on eviction moratorium
Updated 28 February 2021

US Justice Department to appeal judge’s order on eviction moratorium

US Justice Department to appeal judge’s order on eviction moratorium
  • The CDC eviction moratorium was signed in September by President Donald Trump
  • President Joe Biden until March 31 to give tenants a breathing spell as the pandemic continues

WASHINGTON: The Justice Department said Saturday it will appeal a judge’s ruling that found the federal government’s eviction moratorium was unconstitutional.
Prosecutors filed a notice in the case on Saturday evening, saying that it was appealing the matter the to the US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.
On Thursday, US District Judge J. Campbell Barker ruled that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had overstepped its authority and that the moratorium was unlawful.
“Although the COVID-19 pandemic persists, so does the Constitution,” the judge wrote.
The CDC eviction moratorium was signed in September by President Donald Trump and extended by President Joe Biden until March 31.
Barker, who was nominated by Trump in 2018 to serve in the Eastern District of Texas, stopped short of issuing an injunction in the case. Several property owners had brought the litigation arguing that the federal government didn’t have the legal authority to stop evictions.
“The federal government cannot say that it has ever before invoked its power over interstate commerce to impose a residential eviction moratorium,” Barker wrote. “It did not do so during the deadly Spanish Flu pandemic. Nor did it invoke such a power during the exigencies of the Great Depression. The federal government has not claimed such a power at any point during our Nation’s history until last year.”
State and local governments had approved eviction moratoriums early in the pandemic for many renters, but many of those protections have already expired.
To be eligible for protection, renters must have an income of $198,000 or less for couples filing jointly, or $99,000 for single filers; demonstrate they’ve sought government help to pay rent; declare that they can’t pay because of COVID-19 hardships; and affirm that they are likely to become homeless if evicted.


Armenian President Sarkisian rejects army chief’s dismissal

Armenian President Sarkisian rejects army chief’s dismissal
Updated 28 February 2021

Armenian President Sarkisian rejects army chief’s dismissal

Armenian President Sarkisian rejects army chief’s dismissal
  • Earlier in the day, 5,000 opposition protesters waving Armenian flags and calling for Pashinyan’s resignation gathered for the third day running outside the parliament in Yerevan

YEREVAN: Armenian President Armen Sarkisian said on Saturday he had refused to sign a prime ministerial order to dismiss the army’s chief of staff, deepening a national political crisis.
The ex-Soviet nation has faced turmoil since Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan signed a Moscow-brokered peace accord in November, sealing a humiliating defeat to Azerbaijan after six weeks of fighting over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region.
Divisions widened Thursday when Pashinyan defied a call by the military to resign, accused the army of an attempted coup, and ordered the chief of the general staff Onik Gasparyan to be fired.
On Saturday, Armenian President Sarkisian said in a statement that he would not back the sacking.
“The president of the republic, within the framework of his constitutional powers, returned the draft decree with objections,” the presidency said.
It added that the political crisis “cannot be resolved through frequent personnel changes.”
Earlier in the day, 5,000 opposition protesters waving Armenian flags and calling for Pashinyan’s resignation gathered for the third day running outside the parliament in Yerevan.

BACKGROUND

Armenia has faced turmoil since Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan signed a Moscow-brokered peace accord in November.

Some protesters have now set up camp there.
“Today Pashinyan has no support. I call on the security services and the police to join the army, to support the army,” said former premier Vazgen Manukyan, who has been named by the opposition to replace Pashinyan.
“I am sure that the situation will be resolved within two to three days,” he told the crowd.
Pashinyan has faced fierce criticism since he signed a peace deal over Nagorno-Karabakh, an ethnic Armenian region that broke from Azerbaijan’s control during a war in the early 1990s.
The agreement was seen as a national humiliation for many in Armenia, but Pashinyan has said he had no choice but to agree or see his country’s forces suffer even bigger losses.


India urged to provide refuge to Rohingya plucked from sea

India urged to provide refuge to Rohingya plucked from sea
Updated 27 February 2021

India urged to provide refuge to Rohingya plucked from sea

India urged to provide refuge to Rohingya plucked from sea
  • Abide by international laws to deal with refugees rescued near Andaman Islands, Human Rights Watch says
  • New Delhi-based Rohingya Human Rights Initiative (RHRI) demanded that the Indian government “grant a status of refugees to the stranded people”

NEW DELHI: Human Rights Watch (HRW) on Saturday called on India to abide by international laws in protecting refugees a day after New Delhi said it had rescued 81 Rohingya stranded in Indian waters.
“India should abide by its international obligations to offer all protection and access to the UN refugee agency,” Meenakshi Ganguly, South Asia director of the Human Rights Watch (HRW), told Arab News.
On Feb. 11, nearly 90 Rohingya from the Cox’s Bazar refugee camps in Bangladesh boarded a small boat for Malaysia, Anurag Srivastava, India’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson, said in a statement.
Four days later, on Feb. 15, “the boat’s engine broke down, and the boat drifted toward the southern Indian islands of Andaman and Nicobar.”
Eight people lost their lives, and one drowned.
Two days later, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) appealed to “all governments to deploy their search and rescue capacities and promptly disembark those in distress.”
On Friday, New Delhi announced that it had rescued the stranded refugees.
“When we learned of the boat in distress, we immediately dispatched two coast guard ships to provide food, water and medical assistance to the occupants of the boat. Seven of them were administered IV fluids,” the statement said.
It added that since most of “the occupants of the boat have ID cards issued to them by the UNHCR office in Bangladesh,” New Delhi was in talks with Dhaka “to ensure their safe and secure repatriation.”
The HRW, however, said that India needed to do more to abide by its “international obligations” and should not “pass the buck.”
India is not a signatory to the 1951 Refugee Convention, which mandates refugee rights and state responsibilities to protect them. Nor does it have any domestic law to protect the more than 200,000 refugees it currently hosts, including some Rohingya from Myanmar.
“Whether it is India, Thailand, Malaysia, Bangladesh or other countries in the region, governments need to protect the Rohingya refugees instead of trying to pass the buck,” Ganguly told Arab News.
She added that the “primary responsibility” for the plight of the Rohingya lay with Myanmar and that “these governments should join the international community to ensure that the Rohingya can return to their homes voluntarily, with safety and dignity.”
Meanwhile, the New Delhi-based Rohingya Human Rights Initiative (RHRI) demanded that the Indian government “grant a status of refugees to the stranded people.”
“Rohingya stranded in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands are not Bangladeshi; they are hapless refugees. India, being a big country, should shelter these stranded people till the situation normalizes in Myanmar,” RHRI founder Sabber Kyaw Min said.
Min was referring in part to a coup d’etat by the Myanmar military on Feb. 1, which has led to the declaration of a state of emergency by the ruling regime and widespread, nationwide protests.
He called on the Indian government to disclose the refugees’ whereabouts.
“I was in touch with some of the refugees and their relatives till Wednesday, but since then their phones have been off. Rohingya are suffering. New Delhi should demonstrate large-heartedness in accommodating the refugees in the same way Bangladesh has demonstrated,” Min added.
The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are a federally administered archipelago lying between the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. Both Myanmar and Thailand have coastlines along the eastern edge of the sea.
In 2012, some Rohingya refugees were rescued from near the islands and provided medical care and attention, before being sent back to Myanmar.
However, ever since Prime Minister Narendra Modi-led regime assumed office in New Delhi, India has taken a harder line over providing admission and shelter to any Rohingya refugees.
Denis Giles of the Andaman Chronicle, an English newspaper based in Andaman’s capital Port Blair, was the first to break the story about the stranded refugees and alert the world about the crisis.
Giles, who covered the Rohingya rescue operations in 2012, said that this time “there is a big difference.”
“They were properly treated, and the administration used to ask social organizations to help them out, but now no one wants to talk about that. There is a hush now,” Giles told Arab News.
“Earlier, we would know where they are being kept, which hospitals they are being treated at but this time, we are completely in the dark.”
Bangladesh is hosting more than 1.1 million Rohingya who fled from persecution at the Myanmar military’s hands in the Buddhist-majority country.
The Rohingya endured decades of abuse in Myanmar, beginning in the 1970s when hundreds of thousands sought refuge in Bangladesh.
Between 1989 and 1991, an additional 250,000 fled when a military crackdown followed a popular uprising and Burma was renamed Myanmar. In 1992, Bangladesh and Myanmar agreed on a repatriation deal under which thousands of Rohingya returning to Rakhine.
The Rohingya exodus to Bangladesh resumed in August 2017 following a military crackdown on the ethnic minority group.
According to the UN, by the end of 2020, 866,457 Rohingya refugees had been registered at 34 camps in the Cox’s Bazar district of Bangladesh due to a joint initiative by Dhaka and the UNHCR.