Who’s Who: Dr. Yasser M. Hausawi, Institute of Public Administration chief in Makkah 

Dr. Yasser M. Hausawi
Dr. Yasser M. Hausawi
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Updated 04 September 2021

Who’s Who: Dr. Yasser M. Hausawi, Institute of Public Administration chief in Makkah 

Who’s Who: Dr. Yasser M. Hausawi, Institute of Public Administration chief in Makkah 

Dr. Yasser M. Hausawi has been the director general of the Makkah region’s branches of the Institute of Public Administration since 2020.

From February 2017 to August 2020, Hausawi directed the branch’s department of trainee affairs, where he supervised admissions and registration, annual training plans, scheduling, and the academic records of students and trainees.

As an associate professor, Hausawi teaches undergraduate students, trains government employees, and provides consultations to various public and private sector institutions in the Kingdom. He also conducts research in computing and cybersecurity. 

Some of his research includes “The role of cybersecurity awareness in reducing the complexity impact of authentication methods on end-users behavior,” published by the Journal of Umm Al-Qura University, and “Role of usability on using biometrics for cybersecurity,” published by the Journal of Transaction on Networks and Communication, Birmingham, UK, in 2019.

Hausawi was a member of the steering committee at the National Program for Governmental Innovation, the National Transformation Program. He was also an editorial board member at the IPA’s Public Administration Journal in 2018.

Hausawi received a bachelor’s degree in science, majoring in computer science, in 2001 from King Abdul Aziz University. In 2007, he was awarded two master’s degrees in computer science and engineering management by the Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida, US.

Some eight years later, he obtained a Ph.D. in computer science, focusing on usable cybersecurity engineering, from the same institute.

Before joining the IPA, Hausawi worked as a systems analyst at the Ministry of Economy and Planning, and as an information systems specialist at Saudia airline.


Saudi Ministry of Culture launches Suppliers’ Portal

Saudi Ministry of Culture launches Suppliers’ Portal
Updated 9 sec ago

Saudi Ministry of Culture launches Suppliers’ Portal

Saudi Ministry of Culture launches Suppliers’ Portal
  • Platform lets suppliers register for business, submit documents 

RIYADH: The Saudi Ministry of Culture on Monday launched the Suppliers’ Portal, which facilitates communication with local and international suppliers.

Through the portal, suppliers can register and express interest in working with the ministry and its affiliated bodies.

They can also submit legal documents and qualification requirements, generate invoices and track completion certificates through the portal.

Suppliers may make inquiries and requests about other projects submitted by competitors using the portal.

By creating a comprehensive and specialized database for suppliers, the ministry aims to improve the quality of services and meet the cultural objectives of Saudi Vision 2030.


Two-month ban on catching Kingfish in Arabian Gulf underway

Two-month ban on catching Kingfish in Arabian Gulf underway
Updated 1 min ago

Two-month ban on catching Kingfish in Arabian Gulf underway

Two-month ban on catching Kingfish in Arabian Gulf underway
  • Six GCC states are committed to the two-month ban to protect breeding mothers with eggs during spawning and small Kingfish

RIYADH: A two-month ban on catching Kingfish in the Arabian Gulf started Monday, following an announcement from Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Environment, Water, and Agriculture.

“The application of the ban on fishing ‘Kanaad’ or Kingfish on the coasts of the Arabian Gulf in the Eastern Region for two months begins August 15,” said a MEWA statement issued in coordination with Gulf Cooperation Council states.

The six GCC states are committed to the two-month ban to protect breeding mothers with eggs during spawning and small Kingfish, and provide more opportunities for breeding and egg-laying.

The GCC Agricultural Cooperation Committee required Gulf states in 2019 to take measures to protect Kingfish, such as increasing the legal length of fish allowed to be caught, increasing the eye opening in nets, and defining the season for the fishing ban.

MEWA official and CEO of the National Fisheries Development Program, Dr. Ali Al-Shaikhi, told Arab News: “The ban is important to maintain the supplies of Kingfish, regulate the fishing process, avoid draining the Kingfish fisheries, and reduce the pressure of the fishing effort to balance supplies and fishing.”

He said the ban promoted sustainable fishing in environmental, economic, and social terms, boosted the fishing industry, and ensured a good standard of living.

He added that the ban contributed to reducing the depletion of those fish species, maintaining sustainable strategic stocks, and allowing mothers to lay eggs during the ban period.

Al-Shaikhi believed the ministry had succeeded in reducing fishing efforts in fish stores in the Arabian Gulf in recent years, thereby ensuring the protection and sustainability of natural marine resources.

Bans had contributed to the growth and improvement of stocks and supplies, allowing Kingfish to multiply and grow in large quantities and sell at competitive prices in markets, he said.

The bans also educated fishermen about the importance of complying with laws protecting marine resources.

Al-Shaikhi emphasized that the ban was part of the ministry’s desire to achieve its strategic objectives on the sustainability of natural systems, the strengthening of fisheries supplies and quantities, and the sustainability of production.

Bans regulated Kingfish catching through selective means, ensuring the increase of its vital quantities in the waters of the Arabian Gulf and ensuring market price stability.

“There is no doubt that the Eastern Region/Qatif Fisheries Research Center plays an important role in sensitizing and mentoring fishermen to raise awareness of the importance of the prohibition period for certain economic fish.”

Amer Al-Mutairi, director-general of MEWA’s eastern region branch, said the ban included the use of gillnets.

Jaafar al-Safwani, an adviser to the Safwa Fishermen's Cooperative Society, said the bans helped preserve the marine environment, particularly for shrimp, Kingfish, and other fish species.

Safwani, who was a member of the Committee on Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock at the Chamber of Commerce, Eastern Province, told Arab News: “The bans contribute to the indirect improvement of fishermen's income because the ban at certain times of the year allows breeding and improvements in the environment in which many fish live, thereby providing fishermen with more fish and larger volumes throughout the year. Besides, the price of fish increases.”


The Line exhibition comes to a close in Jeddah

The Line exhibition comes to a close in Jeddah
Updated 15 August 2022

The Line exhibition comes to a close in Jeddah

The Line exhibition comes to a close in Jeddah
  • The exhibition included detailed designs, renders and architectural concepts of The Line
  • Visitors were also shown visual presentations and engineering techniques

RIYADH: An exhibition showcasing designs for The Line, a development earmarked for NEOM, came to an end in Jeddah on Sunday.

The exhibition included detailed designs, renders and architectural concepts of The Line, enabling visitors to better understand the scope and complexity of the project.

Visitors were also shown visual presentations and engineering techniques.

The Line will run on 100 percent renewable energy and prioritize the health and wellbeing of people over transportation and infrastructure.

Once completed, the development will be 200 meters wide, 170 kilometers long, and 500 meters above sea level.The exhibition started on August 1 at the Superdome in Jeddah and offered around 50 guided tours per day in both Arabic and English. The displays provided levels of detail that reinforce the ambition of the vision for the new urban environment.

It will now move to other locations in the Kingdom including the Eastern Province and Riyadh.

The project will eventually accommodate 9 million residents and will be built on a footprint of just 34 square kilometers. This small footprint will use less land when compared to other cities of similar capacity and will contribute to conserving 95 percent of NEOM’s land.


Saudi girl, 6, wins five medals in rhythmic gymnastics

Saudi girl, 6, wins five medals in rhythmic gymnastics
Updated 15 August 2022

Saudi girl, 6, wins five medals in rhythmic gymnastics

Saudi girl, 6, wins five medals in rhythmic gymnastics

RIYADH: Six-year-old Saudi girl Elena Habhab has hopes of becoming a Olympic rhythmic gymnast after winning five medals in her first year of competition in Moscow.

Elena discovered her love of the sport while visiting her Russian grandmother and enrolling in one of the city’s sports clubs.

Her mother, Rima Wannous, said: “Elena was impressed to watch girls play and make attractive movements, so she decided to join this fun sport.”

Within three months of joining the beginners’ class, Elena’s skills were noticed by the trainers and she was promoted to a higher class.

She took part in an open club championship in Moscow and won first place.

“With her skills, she managed to win the competition, and then she participated in three championships with a group and took second place,” Wannous said.

“After that we decided that she should stay in Moscow to pursue her dreams since the sport isn’t available in the Kingdom yet.”

Elena’s father, Luaie Habhab, said that his daughter loves the sport “and even does the splits while watching TV.”

Rhythmic gymnastics is a competition for women only, in which the player performs graceful movements to music while holding objects, such as a ribbon or ball.

Referees evaluate the performance and award points to each competitor.

Rhythmic gymnasts are judged on their agility and difficulty of the movements they make, including the skill of launching and capturing the instrument.

Elena trains eight hours a day in Moscow, but says she enjoys the demanding schedule.

Her mother said: “I thought that she would not want to go to Moscow again because of the tough exercises, but she surprised me. When we returned to Saudi Arabia, she insisted that we go back to Russia to train. So I had to leave all my work here and take her to Moscow because this sport doesn’t exist in Saudi Arabia right now.”

Elena’s dream is to represent the Kingdom abroad and compete in the Olympics.

She also speaks three languages: English, Arabic and Russian, and is learning Chinese.

“I love gymnastics because it makes me strong, flexible and patient. I also love competition, and I am happy when I am taking first place,” Elena said.

 


Misk Foundation launches Qimah graduate development program

Misk Foundation launches Qimah graduate development program
Updated 15 August 2022

Misk Foundation launches Qimah graduate development program

Misk Foundation launches Qimah graduate development program
  • Registration for the program began on Aug. 13 and will continue until Aug. 20

JEDDAH: The Mohammed bin Salman Foundation Misk launched the Qimah graduate development program to help talented Saudi youth and recent university graduates to launch their careers by providing them with professional opportunities.

Registration for the program began on Aug. 13 and will continue until Aug. 20.

The one-year program will take place in Riyadh and requires students to attend in person. It will begin on Sept. 25, targeting outstanding recent graduates.

Applications will be limited to Saudi nationals or new graduates of bachelor’s or master’s degrees in the class of 2021 and 2022 from both genders.

Undergraduates of relatedly close majors, such as project management, management, management information systems, public relations, human resources, computer science, and industrial and systems engineering, will be more likely to be accepted.

Application requirements include a GPA of no less than 3.75 out of 5 or 3 out of 4, an English language certificate of TOEFL IBT with a score of 90 or above, or IELTS with a score of 6 or above.

Applications will be limited to Saudi nationals or new graduates of bachelor’s or master’s degrees in the class of 2021 and 2022. (Screenshot/ Twitter Video)

Qimah provides an intensive on-the-job training curriculum for promising graduates and integrates their skills with appropriate development departments.

The first cycle of the Misk graduate development program aims to develop the technical skills of graduates and give them opportunities to advance in an integrated practical environment.

The program also provides a competitive package that includes salary, training courses, annual leave, gym membership, and VIP medical insurance that includes family and parents.

Each trainee must be fully committed to the program and demonstrate an interest in being an active member of Misk.

Qimah provides an intensive on-the-job training curriculum for promising graduates and integrates their skills with appropriate development departments. (Screenshot/ Twitter Video)

The program will be implemented in rotation and rolled out across different projects and focus areas such as project management, marketing, and communications, legal, strategy, finance, risk management, human resources, digital transformation, and procurement management.

Enrolled students will acquire leadership, problem-solving, communication, and data analysis skills.

The mission of the Misk foundation is to discover the talents of Saudi youth and help them to develop by empowering them to become an effective participant in the economy of the country.

It also aims to create opportunities to develop the youth community which will support them in unleashing their potential.