Saudi Arabia’s first Diriyah Biennale signals new era for Kingdom’s cultural scene

Saudi Arabia’s first Diriyah Biennale signals new era for Kingdom’s cultural scene
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Diriyah Contemporary Art Biennale launch event on December 10.
Saudi Arabia’s first Diriyah Biennale signals new era for Kingdom’s cultural scene
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Diriyah Contemporary Art Biennale launch event on December 10.
Saudi Arabia’s first Diriyah Biennale signals new era for Kingdom’s cultural scene
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Diriyah Contemporary Art Biennale launch event on December 10.
Saudi Arabia’s first Diriyah Biennale signals new era for Kingdom’s cultural scene
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Diriyah Biennale Foundation.
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Updated 14 December 2021

Saudi Arabia’s first Diriyah Biennale signals new era for Kingdom’s cultural scene

Saudi Arabia’s first Diriyah Biennale signals new era for Kingdom’s cultural scene
  • The Diriyah Biennal Foundation commissioned 29 new works for the show
  • Event marks Kingdom’s first ever art biennale, with a second event planned for March 2022 dedicated to Islamic art

On the evening of Dec. 10, about 300 guests from Saudi Arabia and abroad congregated just outside of the Diriyah Biennale Foundation in JAX, a new creative district in an industrial area of Riyadh’s historic Diriyah district, for the opening of the Diriyah Contemporary Art Biennale — a historic moment for Saudi Arabia, and one that marked the first time that the Kingdom has ever hosted a biennale dedicated to contemporary art.

The crowd was silent as they listened to an emotive opening speech by Philip Tinari, curator of the biennale and also director and CEO of the UCCA Center for Contemporary Art in China. The biennale’s title, Crossing the River by Feeling the Stones, stems from a Chinese saying signaling the attitude towards China’s reform and opening to the world that began in 1978 — a popular metaphor Chinese leaders use to describe the path they have taken following economic reform. Tinari used it to also refer to Saudi Arabia’s present moment of cultural and social change.




Curator of the Diriyah Contemporary Art Biennale, Philip Tinari, Director and Chief Executive of UCCA.

“As we were preparing this biennale, this slogan spoke to me on two levels, first for its relevance in Saudi Arabia today, where we are privileged to witness a similar moment of dynamism, optimism and openness, and with it, transformative change,” Tinari said.

The biennale, which opened to the public officially on Dec.1 1 and will run until March 11 next year, is situated throughout the newly converted warehouses in the JAX district. It unfolds in six sections, featuring works by about 64 artists from around the world with a focus on 27 Saudi artists.

The Diriyah Biennal Foundation commissioned 29 new works for the show.

The six sections explore the sub-themes of the spiritual in art, environmental heritage and conservation, gender issues, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and community building. Dialogue through culture is one of the aims of the nonprofit Diriyah Contemporary Art Biennale, which was established in 2020 with support from the Saudi Ministry of Culture.

“Having non-commercial spaces in Saudi Arabia is extremely important as it generates very different kinds of art,” artist Dana Awartani told Arab News. “For a long time, the artists here were used to showing in a gallery setting or partaking in art fairs. For me, the work you create in a biennale is the highest level of art, because you are able to experiment and push the boundaries of what you want to do without thinking of creating something that is for sale.”




Installation view, Diriyah Contemporary Art Biennale 2021.

Awartani’s breathtaking 23.7 x 13.5-meter clay earth work, titled “Standing in the Ruins of Aleppo (2021),” takes the form of a long-tiled floor and engages with the theme of cultural destruction through the subject of the Grand Mosque of Aleppo, prompting guests to think about the effects of cultural destruction on society.

“A biennale is about cross-cultural dialogue,” she added. “You learn from your peers and for me that is one of the most exciting things about being in a biennale, and it is so important we have one in Saudi Arabia.”

The artists and curators will tell you that an exhibition of this kind has long been awaited in the Kingdom.

“I am really hoping that this will be a turning point for these individuals and for the scene in general, as we are now able to put these incredible Saudi artists into global dialogue on their home turf and on equal terms with the rest of the world,” co-curator Wejdan Reda told Arab News.

The exhibition opens with two powerful works placed side by side: US artist Richard Long’s “Red Earth Circle,” created during the 1980s for a show in Paris that dubbed itself as the first global contemporary art exhibition, and Saudi artist Maha Malluh’s “World Map” from her “Food for Thought (2021) series,” which incorporates 3,840 cassette tapes to depict a map of the globe. “Good art,” says Malluh, “forces you to pause, to contemplate and to think harder about your surroundings.” The works in this series, which form images and Arabic letters, do exactly this. Around the corner are several vintage cathode-ray TV sets playing an animated archive of photographs from “Saudi Arabia in Prognosis (desert meeting) (2021)” by Saudi artist Ahmed Mater.




 Maha Malluh, Food for Thought “WORLD MAP”, 2021.

In the first section are works by an older generation of Saudi artists showcasing the roots of the present Saudi art scene that has blossomed thanks to numerous government initiatives. On show is a collection of works from the 2000s from the Al-Mansouria Foundation, which reveals works on canvas made by artists such as Fahad Al-Hejailan, Jowhara Al-Saud, Munira Mosli and Ayman Yossri Daydban.

The art in this biennale prompts the visitor to question the social and artistic characteristics common to moments of epochal change. Can there be an aesthetics of reform? The common spirit of urgency found in the works on show — despite their diverse aesthetics and chosen mediums — seems to suggest that there might be, especially as a culture is on the brink of great change.

What unfolds throughout the exhibition’s winding halls and multitudinous spaces are multi-disciplinary works by artists from Saudi Arabia, the Middle East and beyond, placed in dialogue as they seem to call out in unison almost urgently to be seen and heard. Elsewhere in the first section, works explore ideas of urban transformation, economic history, social structures and progression. One such work is a powerful video installation, “Sakura,” by renowned US artist Sarah Morris. It captures historical moments and places, from the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the frenzy of downtown Manhattan to the cultural and industrial landscape of Rio de Janeiro.

There is also the late Moroccan artist’s Mohamed Melehi’s vibrant paintings of abstract forms; South African William Kentridge’s eight-channel video installation “More Sweetly Play the Dance (2015),” depicting a never-ending joyful procession of dancers and musicians from the beginning to end of the installation; Saudi artist Dania Al-Saleh’s installation “That Which Remains (2021),” investigating the disappearance and preservation of cultural memory in the face of globalization through depictions of old footage and images from Saudi Arabia; the paintings from Egyptian artist Ibrahim El Dessouki’s “Series of Gated Communities,” as well as Saudi artist Filwa Nazer’s “Five Women,” a group of sculptural works made in textile and haberdashery exploring themes of transition and memory by deconstructing the designs of traditional Arabic female dresses.




‘Five Women’, by the Saudi Artist Filwa Nazer.

It would be hard not to take note of the powerful works by 12 Chinese artists on show interspersed throughout the exhibition. They exemplify the parallels between China’s moment of reform during the 1980s and Saudi Arabia’s rapidly sweeping socio-economic changes being instituted largely under Vision 2030.

“I live and work in Beijing and run a place called UCCA Center for Contemporary Art,” Tinari told Arab News. “For the last 10 years I have done a lot of academic and curatorial research on the Chinese avant-garde. I saw some parallels between where Saudi is today and where China has been in terms of opening to the world, culturally speaking.”

Simon Denny’s “Real Mass Entrepreneurship (2017-2021),” for example, reveals an installation that fills the entirety of one room. It explores the changes taking place in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen since the establishment of the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone in 1980 and how the city served as linchpin for China’s economic reforms — a transformative process that coincided with the growth of contemporary art in the country.




Installation view, Diriyah Contemporary Art Biennale 2021.

One two-channel video work by Lei Lei & Chai Mi, titled “1993-1994 (2021),” commissioned by the Diriyah Biennale Foundation, was inspired by the accidental discovery of a family archive. Much of the footage was shot by Chai’s father, who worked in the UAE for seven years in the 1990s. Decades ago, Chai’s father documented his daily life in the Gulf with a video cassette against the background of Cantonese pop music.

Among the Saudi contingent of artists are notable works by Sultan bin Fahad, titled “Dream Traveled (2021).” It reveals a startlingly beautifu tented room made of colored beads depicting Hajj murals and images from the Holy Qur’an. There is also Sarah Ibrahim’s “Soft Machines (2021),” a video installation investigating the human body as a vessel of memory, a site of transformation and a vehicle of communication and ultimately, a place where one and the collective can transcend. Abdullah Al-Othman’s joyful installation “Manifesto: The Language & City (2021)” reveals a pulsating large-scale work made in neon, LED and found wooden signage to recreate the street signs of Riyadh, where the artist condenses the city into a visual, cultural and architectural language.




 Abdullah Al Othman, Manifesto, The Language & City.

Conceptual artist Muhannad Shono’s eerie yet captivating “On Losing Meaning (2021)” presents a programmable robot covered in petroleum jelly and pigment tips, creating an abstract form as it moves across the floor. “As a child, my imagination was everything, an escape, and a way to reshape the environment around me,” he said in a statement. “By creating narratives and drawing characters, I could make the world as I wanted to see it.”

The last section, Concerning the Spiritual, seems to suggest that social and cultural reform might possibly be met with a mindset that transcends the earthly realm. The works in this section are light-infused, ethereal structures, most notably the large blue glass sculpture by Larry Bell called “Iceberg (2020).” It transports the viewer outside of his or her own reality towards something greater — towards the idea of the infinite. The first edition of Saudi Arabia’s first contemporary art biennale thus concludes with an exploration into how no matter what problems the world faces, art can uplift, transcend and transport us to something greater than ourselves.


Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud receives honorary doctorate from Marymount University

Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud received an honorary doctorate from Marymount University in Virginia. (Supplied)
Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud received an honorary doctorate from Marymount University in Virginia. (Supplied)
Updated 17 May 2022

Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud receives honorary doctorate from Marymount University

Princess Reema bint Bandar Al-Saud received an honorary doctorate from Marymount University in Virginia. (Supplied)
  • The princess thanks Marymount University for hosting Saudi students throughout the years

RIYADH: Princess Reema bint Bandar Al Saud, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US, received an honorary doctorate from Marymount University in Virginia last Friday in honor of her work empowering women across sectors in the Kingdom and globally.

The president of Marymount University, Dr. Irma Becerra, presented Princess Reema with the honorary degree — her first — at the commencement ceremony.

The Saudi ambassador gave the commencement address for the College of Health and Education graduates at the university.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Princess Reema gave the commencement address for the College of Health and Education graduates at the university.

• She congratulated the graduates and thanked the university for hosting Saudi students throughout the years.

In her address, she congratulated the graduates and thanked the university for hosting Saudi students throughout the years.

Princess Reema, who graduated from George Washington University with a degree in museum studies, has an extensive career working towards the empowerment of women in both the private and public sectors.

From 2007 to 2015, she was CEO of Alfa International Co. Ltd. — Harvey Nichols Riyadh, a multi-brand luxury retail company. During her time in this position, she commissioned the study “Obstacles for Women in the Workplace.” The study set the tone for female inclusion in retail and resulted in the opening of the first workplace nursery.

In 2013, she founded Alf Khair, a social enterprise aimed at elevating the professional capital of Saudi women through a curriculum developed to enable financial self-sufficiency.

In 2016, Princess Reema left the private sector to begin a career in public service as vice president of women’s affairs at the Saudi General Sports Authority, where she developed policies and programs that benefited women and children throughout Saudi Arabia.

In 2018, she was also appointed president of the Mass Participation Federation, making her the first woman to lead a multi-sports federation in the Kingdom, a role she occupied until her appointment as Saudi ambassador to the US.


Lights, cameras, action… and more besides, at the Saudi Entertainment and Amusement Expo

Lights, cameras, action… and more besides, at the Saudi Entertainment and Amusement Expo
Updated 17 May 2022

Lights, cameras, action… and more besides, at the Saudi Entertainment and Amusement Expo

Lights, cameras, action… and more besides, at the Saudi Entertainment and Amusement Expo
  • Developers and manufacturers in the entertainment sector are showcasing innovative, cutting-edge products and services during the event in Riyadh
  • It is taking place alongside the Saudi Light and Sound Expo, the first dedicated event in the Kingdom for professional lighting and audio equipment

RIYADH: The Saudi Entertainment and Amusement Expo and Summit began in Riyadh on Monday, alongside the Saudi Light and Sound Expo, the first dedicated event in the Kingdom for professional lighting and audio equipment.

The three-day dual event at the Riyadh International Convention and Exhibition Center showcases thousands of cutting-edge products and solutions for the entertainment sector, and offers professionals in the leisure and entertainment sector the chance to discover new products, learn about the most exciting innovations in the sector, network and do business with vendors.

The international exhibitors are presenting a wide range of products and services, including thrill rides, playground equipment, arcade machines, food and beverage equipment, professional lighting rigs, sound systems, event technology, security tools, and marketing solutions.

Attendees can experience a variety of fun events and activities while engaging with local, regional and global entertainment communities at the Amusement Services International pavilion during the expo, where the line-up includes virtual reality experiences, the latest video and arcade games, and carnival attractions, to name but a few.

Among the technology on show is the 3Motion simulator, which uses hydraulic actuators with precise control to deliver the same dynamic feedback you would get when driving a real racing car. Meanwhile SODIKART, a leader in the karting industry, presents its latest products and services, including a kart simulator.

Matt Wells, the CEO of Frontgrid, which owns ParadropVR, a virtual reality flying experience, told Arab News: “I am very happy to be here having a great time at the SEA summit and looking forward to working with the people here.”

In March, Frontgrid announced an exclusive distribution partnership with ASI to support the continued growth and success of ParadropVR. ASI is now Frontgrid’s distributor across the Middle East, including in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and the UAE, and in Egypt, Tunisia and Morocco.

Marloes Knippenberg, the CEO of lifestyle operator Kerten Hospitality is appearing as a panelist at the summit.

“The world has really changed; consumer behavior has changed a lot,” he told Arab News. “More than 60 percent of the Saudi population is under 35 and the expectations from them as consumers has really changed.

“When you look at this conference, at the perfect timing, I think never was there so much conversation like today, with a lot more opportunity for the hospitality sector in the entertainment segment. There are a lot more expectations and I am looking forward to it.”

The SEA and SLS expos were expected to attract more than 10,000 visitors. In addition to the exhibitors showcasing business opportunities, entertainment options, innovations, and technology, there are also sessions to discuss trends and future visions within the industry, and networking events.

The inaugural SLS Expo, meanwhile, offers businesses and developers the chance to show off their products and services through specially staged laser, light and sound shows.

RS Research and Strategy will share insights from its Voice of The Market research, conducted on behalf of the expo, to offer a deeper understanding of the factors that can help generate opportunities, or create challenges, for those considering entering the light and sound or entertainment markets.

Saudi Arabia has embarked in recent years on a rapid transformation that is not only economic in nature but also cultural, by identifying travel, tourism and entertainment as priority sectors as part of the nation’s Vision 2030 economic diversification initiative.

The General Entertainment Authority was founded in 2016 to organize, develop and lead the entertainment sector in the country, triggering a transformation and the introduction of a wide range of exciting entertainment options. Since then, the sector has grown exponentially in the Kingdom, helping to improve the quality of life of residents and contributing to economic development by creating investment opportunities and thousands of jobs.

The SEA expo, which was launched four years ago, is the only trade show in the country dedicated to the flourishing leisure and entertainment sectors.

“Saudi Arabia is leading the way in encouraging collaboration and action by thinking big,” said Sarkis Kahwajian, SEA Expo’s event director. “This will lead to a strong and sustainable future for the entertainment and amusement industry.

“Saudi Arabia is developing its tourism destinations, which represent great opportunities, especially since the Kingdom’s wealth of spectacular landscapes and cultural heritage is still unknown to the international traveler.”

Yael Coifman, a senior partner at Leisure Development Partners and the president of the Europe and Middle East division of the Themed Entertainment Association, said: “The goals proposed as part of the entertainment strategy for KSA are inspiring and visionary.

“We think there is real potential in this market and although some of the members are already involved in the planning, there are opportunities for many others to influence and help shape the future of the entertainment industry in the Middle East, bringing global knowledge to the region.”

One example of the ways in which the entertainment sector in Saudi Arabia is evolving was the decision by the government in 2018 to end a 30-year ban on cinemas. By the end of 2021, 45 movie theaters had opened in the country and screened more than 1,000 films. In addition, the Red Sea International Film Festival was launched in 2019 and the inaugural event took place in December last year.

It is expected that by 2030 there will be 350 cinemas and 2,500 movie screens in Saudi Arabia, and the industry will be worth about $1 billion.

The development and expansion of the entertainment sector in the Kingdom has spawned an ambitious construction pipeline of movie theaters, theme parks and sports-related infrastructure, along with the hosting of live mega events.

In addition, the great success of Saudi Seasons — an annual series of festivals across the country featuring concerts, motor racing, pop-up restaurants, auto shows and other forms of entertainment — have shown the huge demand in the sector.

The GEA has pledged to invest up to $64 billion by 2028 to develop the Kingdom’s domestic entertainment sector.

In terms of tourism, Saudi authorities plan to welcome more than 100 million visitors each year by 2030, and to this end have implemented numerous related initiatives, including an electronic visa system for citizens of 49 countries.


Saudi ministry creates ‘skill development’ strategy to enhance Saudization

Abdullah Abuthnain speaking at the opening session of the conference. (HRDF)
Abdullah Abuthnain speaking at the opening session of the conference. (HRDF)
Updated 17 May 2022

Saudi ministry creates ‘skill development’ strategy to enhance Saudization

Abdullah Abuthnain speaking at the opening session of the conference. (HRDF)
  • The ministry has established a “forecasting of supply and demand” unit within the human capacity development program, which will provide researchers with data, information and insights into labor market trends

RIYADH: The Saudi Ministry of Human Resources and Social Development is focusing on a skills strategy to improve professional standards for workers and those entering the labor market, according to Abdullah Abuthnain, the vice minister.

Abuthnain said that the strategy will benefit more than 200 professions, with skills councils establishing employment standards, as well as on-the-job training programs, in important economic sectors.

FASTFACT

The strategy will benefit more than 200 professions, with skills councils establishing employment standards, as well as on-the-job training programs, in important economic sectors.

The vice minister made his comments during the inaugural Scientific Conference for Labor Market Research, Studies and Indicators, organized by the National Labor Observatory, an affiliate of the Human Resources Development Fund, in collaboration with Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University.

Academics and professionals gathered in Riyadh on Tuesday for the First Scientific Conference for Labor Market Research, Studies, and Indicators organized by Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University.  (Supplied/HRDF)

During the opening session of the two-day conference in Riyadh on Tuesday, Abuthnain said that Saudi Arabia’s labor market is presently in “a phase of big reforms,” including eight strategic labor market themes and 25 development initiatives.

The ministry has established a “forecasting of supply and demand” unit within the human capacity development program, which will provide researchers with data, information and insights into labor market trends.

The unit identifies opportunities and challenges facing the labor market by issuing specialized reports showing future trends, he said, adding that the unit will primarily assist educational institutions in designing educational and training programs.

Abuthnain expressed optimism about the Kingdom’s labor market, which has seen “positive developments in its indicators and gains,” noting that more than 2 million Saudis now work in the private sector, “the highest figure historically speaking.”

Mohammad Aalmughaiseb, Director of Research and Studies Department at the National Labor Observatory (NLO), Dr. Abdullah Abuthnain, Vice Minister of Human Resources and Social Development for Labor, Dr. Ahmed Al-Ameri, President of Imam Mohammed bin Saud Islamic University, Dr. Lilac Al-Safadi, President of Saudi Electronic University and Dr. Enas Al-Issa, Director of Noura University. (Supplied/ HRDF)

Economic participation has reached 51 percent, while economic participation of Saudi women has also reached 35 percent, “the highest figure historically.”

Turki Al-Jawini, director-general of HRDF, said that the fund had redesigned support programs with a focus on the impact assessment and analysis of big data; their relevance to the needs of beneficiaries; the possibility of measuring their reach, impact and efficiency; and the application of a governance model that enables the fund to adjust the design of the program to suit changing market needs.

“We at HRDF will work to develop and implement labor market policies by creating a sustainable national workforce, developing human cadres’ skills, providing them with knowledge and qualifications, and aligning them with labor market and job needs,” he said.

“We will use a strategy that prioritizes the beneficiary in the design and delivery of works and services and modernizes the human resources system by utilizing visions and sketching future labor market directions.”

Al-Jawini said that the HRDF strategy focused on three main objectives: Reducing the gap between education outcomes and labor market needs, increasing the efficiency of matching supply and demand, and enabling sustainable employment for groups facing labor market challenges.

Among the most significant problems for graduates is understanding labor market needs, linking labor market requirements with their skills, having the necessary experience, and possessing the most in-demand soft skills.

Direct coaching and mentoring for leaders comes within the framework of programs that support and empower women in the labor market, he said.

About 1,000 female leaders benefited from the programs, which helped find jobs for more than 65,000 women in private sector companies. Around 3,500 Saudi mothers benefited from Qurrah, a program that supports child care.

Al-Jawini said that about 51,000 Saudi women employees benefited from Wusool, a program that supports transport for female workers. About 7,000 job-seekers were employed in 2021, thanks to the Tamheer program, which offers female workers on-the-job training.

Mishaal Aledwani, professor of administration and educational planning at Imam Muhammad bin Saud Islamic University, said that Saudi universities are undergoing substantial change as a result of external developments, as well as advances in technology and knowledge development.

The Saudi labor market needs skilled graduates who can work efficiently. Saudi universities face challenges maintaining their status and excellence, both locally and internationally, through the use of innovative learning methods and the provision of training programs for students, Aledwani said.

According to the former dean of the faculty of social sciences, Saudi universities’ performance in adapting graduates to the needs of the labor market is “average.”

Aledwani said that his research had revealed that one of the most significant challenges facing universities is inadequate training and qualification of students before they enter the labor market.

This includes poor coordination between universities and employers to determine the skills graduates need.

Zaid Al-Khumishi, educational supervisor at the Saudi Ministry of Education, discussed the application of artificial intelligence in human resource professional development to suit the needs of the Saudi labor market.

Al-Khumishi has worked in the education industry for almost two decades, recruiting specialists in electronic technology to build training programs employing artificial intelligence.

He suggested designing artificial intelligence-based training programs that meet the needs of the Saudi labor market and workers “by conducting a comprehensive survey of those needs and setting priorities for them to build training programs that meet those needs.”


Deal to provide healthcare services in Diriyah signed

The agreement was signed by Jerry Inzerillo, CEO of the authority, and Abdullah bin Khathlan, CEO of Riyadh Third Health Cluster
The agreement was signed by Jerry Inzerillo, CEO of the authority, and Abdullah bin Khathlan, CEO of Riyadh Third Health Cluster
Updated 17 May 2022

Deal to provide healthcare services in Diriyah signed

The agreement was signed by Jerry Inzerillo, CEO of the authority, and Abdullah bin Khathlan, CEO of Riyadh Third Health Cluster
  • Inzerillo added that both parties will work together to support the local community’s participation in international healthcare days using events and social media

RIYADH: The Diriyah Gate Development Authority has signed an agreement with the Riyadh Third Health Cluster to collaborate on the provision of healthcare and community services for residents of Diriyah.
The agreement was signed by Jerry Inzerillo, chief executive officer of the authority, and Abdullah bin Khathlan, CEO of Riyadh Third Health Cluster.
Inzerillo highlighted the importance of cooperation in joint initiatives and programs for community development in Diriyah and the necessity of collaboration to increase health awareness and the healthcare services offered in the city.
He added that both parties will work together to support the local community’s participation in international healthcare days using events and social media.
Bin Khathlan said the agreement will boost efforts to spread the culture of healthcare volunteering, adding that the Riyadh Third Health Cluster is committed to providing the best possible healthcare “in a comprehensive, sustainable way.”
The Diriyah Gate Development Authority aims to improve the quality of life within the entire Diriyah district by introducing regulations and guidelines which are designed to preserve the area unique cultural status within the Kingdom, while maintaining Saudi heritage.

 


Tabuk governor receives Hirofumi Miyake

Tabuk Gov. Prince Fahd bin Sultan meets Hirofumi Miyake, Deputy Head of Mission of the Embassy of Japan in Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
Tabuk Gov. Prince Fahd bin Sultan meets Hirofumi Miyake, Deputy Head of Mission of the Embassy of Japan in Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
Updated 17 May 2022

Tabuk governor receives Hirofumi Miyake

Tabuk Gov. Prince Fahd bin Sultan meets Hirofumi Miyake, Deputy Head of Mission of the Embassy of Japan in Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
  • In recent years, the bilateral relationship between Saudi Arabia and Japan has grown, especially after the launch of the Saudi-Japan Vision 2030 in the year 2017

TABUK: Tabuk Gov. Prince Fahd bin Sultan received Deputy Head of Mission of the Embassy of Japan in Saudi Arabia Hirofumi Miyake and his delegation as it visited the area.
After welcoming Miyake and his team, Prince Fahd commended the deep-rooted relations between the two friendly countries, and the joint cooperation in various areas, and both parties exchanged friendly conversations and discussed topics of common interest.
Miyake expressed his happiness at meeting Prince Fahd and praised Tabuk’s developmental progress in all crucial areas. He also presented the Tabuk governor with a memento at the end of the reception.  
In recent years, the bilateral relationship between Saudi Arabia and Japan has grown, especially after the launch of the Saudi-Japan Vision 2030 in the year 2017. Many events and activities have been held recently in various Saudi cities that are rich in cultural diversity.
Despite the difficulties caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, both the Kingdom and Japan have made every effort to accomplish these projects and ensure that their bilateral relations flourish.
In March, Japanese premier held talks with the Saudi leadership regarding Saudi oil output in the wake of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.