New Philippine administration to oppose Chinese presence in disputed waters

Chinese structures and an airstrip on the man-made Subi Reef at the Spratly group of islands in the South China Sea are seen from a Philippine Air Force C-130. (AP file photo)
Chinese structures and an airstrip on the man-made Subi Reef at the Spratly group of islands in the South China Sea are seen from a Philippine Air Force C-130. (AP file photo)
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Updated 11 June 2022

New Philippine administration to oppose Chinese presence in disputed waters

Chinese structures and an airstrip on the man-made Subi Reef in the South China Sea are seen from a Philippine Air Force C-130.
  • The Philippines calls on China to comply with its obligations under international law, cease and desist from displaying illegal and irresponsible behavior

MANILA: The administration of President-elect Ferdinand Marcos Jr. will continue to oppose Beijing’s presence in the Philippine part of the South China Sea, the incoming national security adviser said on Friday, after over 100 vessels from Asia’s largest economy were spotted in the disputed waters.
The South China Sea is a strategic and resource-rich waterway claimed by China almost in its entirety, but other countries, including the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, and Brunei, also have overlapping claims.
The Philippines has filed hundreds of diplomatic protests against Chinese activity in the South China Sea in the past few years, after an international tribunal in The Hague dismissed Beijing’s sweeping claims to the region in 2016.

HIGHLIGHT

President-elect Ferdinand Marcos Jr. will add to hundreds of diplomatic protests filed against Beijing in the South China Sea over the past few years.

“We will continue to file diplomatic protests. Never mind that we are filing 10,000 of them because if we don’t, that means we acquiesce to the situation on the ground,” Clarita Carlos, nominated as Marcos’ national security adviser, said in a media briefing.
Marcos, who scored a landslide victory in last month’s presidential election, will take over the country’s top office from outgoing President Rodrigo Duterte on June 30.
Carlos’ comments followed a formal complaint with the Chinese Embassy in Manila launched by the Department of Foreign Affairs against “the lingering unauthorized presence of Chinese fishing and maritime vessels,” which it said in a statement was “not only illegal, but is also a source of instability in the region.”
The foreign office disclosed on Thursday that Philippine authorities spotted in April “over 100 Chinese vessels illegally operating” in a part of the country’s exclusive economic zone around the boomerang-shaped Whitsun Reef — a year after a similar incident caused a diplomatic row.
“The Philippines calls on China to comply with its obligations under international law, cease and desist from displaying illegal and irresponsible behavior, avoid further escalating tensions at sea and immediately withdraw all of its vessels from Philippine maritime zones,” the Department of Foreign Affairs stated.
While Marcos’s immediate predecessor fostered warmer ties with China by setting aside The Hague tribunal’s ruling in exchange for promises of trade and investment, the president-elect, who vowed in his campaign to embrace Duterte’s key policies, said last month he would uphold the international ruling against Beijing.
“We have a very important ruling in our favor and we will use it to continue to assert our territorial rights. It is not a claim. It is already our territorial right,” he told the local media.
“We’re talking about China.
We talk to China consistently with a firm voice,” he said, but added: “We cannot go to war with them. That’s the last thing we need right now.”

 


Erdogan warns of ‘another Chernobyl’ after talks in Ukraine

Erdogan warns of ‘another Chernobyl’ after talks in Ukraine
Updated 12 sec ago

Erdogan warns of ‘another Chernobyl’ after talks in Ukraine

Erdogan warns of ‘another Chernobyl’ after talks in Ukraine
  • A flare-up in fighting around Europe’s largest nuclear facility in Russian-controlled southern Ukraine has sparked urgent warnings from world leaders
LVIV, Ukraine: Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan warned Thursday of a nuclear disaster in Ukraine during his first face-to-face talks with President Volodymyr Zelensky since Russia’s invasion began, echoing pleas from the UN’s chief.
A flare-up in fighting around Europe’s largest nuclear facility in Russian-controlled southern Ukraine has sparked urgent warnings from world leaders, and UN chief Antonio Guterres cautioned during talks with Erdogan that any damage to the plant would be akin to “suicide.”
“We are worried. We don’t want another Chernobyl,” Erdogan said during a press conference in the eastern city of Lviv, during which he also assured the Ukrainian leader that Ankara was a firm ally.
“While continuing our efforts to find a solution, we remain on the side of our Ukraine friends,” Erdogan said.
Guterres said he was “gravely concerned” about the situation at the plant and that it had to be demilitarized, adding: “We must tell it like it is — any potential damage to Zaporizhzhia is suicide.”
Erdogan, who has major geopolitical rivalries with the Kremlin but maintains a close working relationship with President Vladimir Putin, met with the Russian leader less than two weeks ago in the Black Sea resort of Sochi.
The Turkish leader and Guterres were key brokers of a deal inked in Istanbul last month allowing for the resumption of grain exports from Ukraine after Russia’s invasion blocked essential global supplies.
The success of the grain deal contrasts with failed peace talks early in the war, and Zelensky on Thursday ruled out peace with Russia unless it withdrew its troops from Ukraine.
He told reporters he was “very surprised” to hear from Erdogan that Russia was “ready for some kind of peace,” adding: “First they should leave our territory and then we’ll see.”
Fighting raged along the front on Thursday and early Friday.
Bombardments across the city of Kharkiv and nearby Krasnograd left at least six dead and 25 injured on Thursday, just one day after Russian bombardments killed 13 in the country’s second-largest urban center.
Early-morning shelling on Friday also targeted the city of Nikopol, according to a local military official, while the mayor of Mykolayiv reported “massive explosions” there around the same time.
Fighting in recent weeks has focused around the southern region of Zaporizhzhia and the nuclear facility there, and Zelensky called on the UN to ensure security at the plant after direct talks with Guterres, while also blaming Russia for “deliberate” attacks on the facility.
Russian forces took the plant in March and uncertainty surrounding it has fueled fears of a nuclear incident.
Moscow dismissed Ukrainian allegations Thursday, saying its forces had not deployed heavy weapons at Zaporizhzhia and accusing Kyiv of preparing a “provocation” there that would see Russia “accused of creating a man-made disaster at the plant.”
Kyiv, however, insisted it was Moscow that was planning a “provocation” at the facility.
Ukrainian military intelligence said in a Facebook post on Thursday night that it had received reports that all but a “small part of operational personnel” at the plant had been ordered to stay home on Friday, while representatives of Russia’s state nuclear operator “actually left the territory” of the facility.
“Considering the number of weapons that are currently located on the territory of the nuclear plant, as well as repeated provocative shelling, there is a high probability of a large-scale terrorist attack at the nuclear facility,” it said.

Xi, Putin to attend G20 summit in Bali, says Indonesia’s Widodo — Bloomberg News

Xi, Putin to attend G20 summit in Bali, says Indonesia’s Widodo — Bloomberg News
Updated 19 August 2022

Xi, Putin to attend G20 summit in Bali, says Indonesia’s Widodo — Bloomberg News

Xi, Putin to attend G20 summit in Bali, says Indonesia’s Widodo — Bloomberg News

Chinese and Russian leaders Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin will attend the G20 summit in Bali in November, Indonesian President Joko Widodo told Bloomberg News on Thursday.
“Xi Jinping will come. President Putin has also told me he will come,” Jokowi, as he is popularly known, told the news agency.
The Chinese foreign ministry did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment. Indonesia presidential palace officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment.
Indonesia is chairing the Group of 20 major economies and has faced pressure from Western countries to withdraw its invitation to Putin over his country’s invasion on Ukraine, which his government calls a “special military operation.”
Jokowi has sought to position himself as mediator between the warring countries, and has traveled to meet both Ukraine’s and Russia’s presidents. This week, Jokowi said both countries have accepted Indonesia as a “bridge of peace.”
Leaders of major countries, including US President Joe Biden, are set to meet in Indonesia’s resort island of Bali in November. Indonesia has also invited Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelensky.


UK spy chief says Putin is losing information war in Ukraine — The Economist

UK spy chief says Putin is losing information war in Ukraine — The Economist
Updated 19 August 2022

UK spy chief says Putin is losing information war in Ukraine — The Economist

UK spy chief says Putin is losing information war in Ukraine — The Economist

Russia has failed to gain ground in cyberspace against Ukraine almost six months after its invasion of the country, the head of Britain’s GCHQ intelligence service said on Friday.
Jeremy Fleming, the intelligence head, in an op-ed in The Economist, wrote that both countries have been using their cyber capabilities in the war in Ukraine.
“So far, president Putin has comprehensively lost the information war in Ukraine and in the West. Although that’s cause for celebration, we should not underestimate how Russian disinformation is playing out elsewhere in the world,” Fleming wrote.
“Just as with its land invasion, Russia’s initial online plans appear to have fallen short. The country’s use of offensive cyber tools has been irresponsible and indiscriminate.”
Fleming said Russia had deployed WhisperGate malware to destroy and deface Ukrainian government systems.
He also said Russia has used the same playbook before on Syria and the Balkans and said online disinformation is a major part of Russia’s strategy. However, the GCHQ has been able to intercept and to provide warnings in time, he said.
Without going into much detail, Fleming said the UK’s National Cyber Force could respond to Russia by deploying a UK military unit that employs offensive cyber tools.


Brain-eating amoeba suspected in 2nd US Midwest death

Brain-eating amoeba suspected in 2nd US Midwest death
Updated 19 August 2022

Brain-eating amoeba suspected in 2nd US Midwest death

Brain-eating amoeba suspected in 2nd US Midwest death
  • People are usually infected when water containing the amoeba enters the body through the nose while swimming or diving into lakes and rivers

OMAHA, Nebraska: A child likely died from a rare infection caused by a brain-eating amoeba after swimming in an eastern Nebraska river, health officials said, making it the second such probable death in the Midwest this summer and raising the question of whether climate change is playing a role.
The Douglas County Department of Health based in Omaha, Nebraska, reported Wednesday that doctors believe the child died of primary amebic meningoencephalitis, a usually fatal infection caused by the naegleria fowleri amoeba. Health officials believe the child came into contact with the amoeba on Sunday while swimming in the Elkhorn River just west of Omaha.
Officials have not released the child’s identity.
Last month, a Missouri resident died of the same infection likely caused by the amoeba at Lake of Three Fires in southwestern Iowa. Iowa officials closed the lake’s beach as a precaution for nearly three weeks.
People are usually infected when water containing the amoeba enters the body through the nose while swimming or diving into lakes and rivers. Other sources have been documented, including tainted tap water in a Houston-area city in 2020. Symptoms include fever, headache, nausea or vomiting, progressing to a stiff neck, loss of balance, hallucinations and seizures.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says naegleria fowleri infections are rare — there are about three cases in the United States every year — but that those infections are overwhelmingly fatal.
There were 154 cases reported between 1962 and 2021 in the US, with only four survivors, according to the CDC. Of those, 71 cases were reported between 2000 and 2021. Texas and Florida recorded the most infections with 39 and 37 cases respectively, and the amoeba is typically found in southern states because it thrives in waters that are warmer than 86 degrees Fahrenheit (30 Celsius).
But infections have migrated north in recent years, including two cases in Minnesota since 2010, Douglas County Health Director Dr. Lindsey Huse noted during a news conference Thursday.
“Our regions are becoming warmer,” she said. “As things warm up, the water warms up and water levels drop because of drought, you see that this organism is a lot happier and more typically grows in those situations.”
According to the National Water Information System, the surface water temperature near where the child was swimming was between 86 and 92 degrees.
Jacob Lorenzo-Morales, a researcher at the Universidad de La Laguna in the Canary Islands who has studied naegleria fowleri, said Thursday that an increase in infections since 2000 can be blamed on two factors: better knowledge and diagnosis of the disease, and the rising temperature in bodies of water providing “a perfect environment” for the amoeba to thrive.
Researcher Sutherland Maciver, who has studied the amoeba at the Center for Discovery Brain Sciences at Edinburgh Medical School in Scotland, says not all infections are reported and that the 430 cases that have ever been reported worldwide are almost certainly an undercount. And, he said, scientists cannot say with certainty that the Nebraska case is directly attributable to climate change.
The two researchers co-authored a paper titled “Is Naegleria fowleri an Emerging Parasite?” that examined factors behind the increase in reported cases.
Health officials recommend that freshwater swimmers plug their noses, avoid putting their heads underwater and avoid activities such as water skiing and tubing, which could force water into the nose, eyes or mouth. You cannot be infected by drinking contaminated water.


Crisis-hit Sri Lanka to ask Japan to open talks with main creditors, says Wickremesinghe

Crisis-hit Sri Lanka to ask Japan to open talks with main creditors, says Wickremesinghe
Updated 18 August 2022

Crisis-hit Sri Lanka to ask Japan to open talks with main creditors, says Wickremesinghe

Crisis-hit Sri Lanka to ask Japan to open talks with main creditors, says Wickremesinghe
  • Sri Lanka, a tear-shaped tropical country of 22 million people, is facing its most severe financial crisis since independence from Britain in 1948

COLOMBO: Sri Lanka will ask Japan to invite the Indian Ocean island’s main creditor nations, including China and India, to talks on bilateral debt restructuring, as it seeks a way out of its worst economic crisis in decades, its president said on Thursday.

“Someone needs to call in, invite the main creditor nations. We will ask Japan to do it,” President Ranil Wickremesinghe told Reuters in an interview, adding that he would travel to Tokyo next month and hold talks with Japanese premier Fumio Kishida.

Sri Lanka, a tear-shaped tropical country of 22 million people, is facing its most severe financial crisis since independence from Britain in 1948, resulting from the combined impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and economic mismanagement.

Left with scant foreign exchange reserves, stalling imports of essentials including fuel and medicines, ordinary Sri Lankans have been battling crippling shortages of months amid sky-rocketing inflation and a devalued currency.

Public anger stoked unprecedented mass protests, with thousands of people storming the colonial-era presidential residence in Sri Lanka’s commercial capital Colombo in early July, forcing then president Gotabaya Rajapaksa into hiding.

Protesters occupied the residence for days, some of them sleeping in the president’s bedroom and others frolicking in a swimming pool surrounded by manicured gardens.

Rajapaksa, a former military officer, then fled the country to Singapore and resigned, becoming the first Sri Lankan president to quit mid-term.

Wickremesinghe, who is also finance minister, said he will present an interim budget in September which won a parliamentary vote and took office as president on July 21. Local broadcaster Newsfirst, citing a former ambassador, said on Wednesday that Rajapaksa would return home next week.

Wickremesinghe said he was “not aware” of any such plans, speaking to Reuters at the presidential secretariat, part of which had also been occupied by protesters.

Besides seeking assistance from its allies, Sri Lanka is also negotiating with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for a loan package worth between $2 billion and $3 billion, Wickremesinghe said.

Sri Lanka’s total bilateral debt was estimated at $6.2 billion at the end of 2020 by the IMF, according to a March report. An IMF team is expected to arrive in the country at the end of August to continue talks to reach a staff-level agreement.

Wickremesinghe, a six-time prime minister who is also finance minister, said he will present an interim budget in September which will focus on fiscal consolidation measures agreed with the IMF.

Expenditure will be slashed by a “few hundred billions” of rupees to channels funds for welfare and to repay high interest rates, he said.

Cuts will include defense, which has retained the highest budgetary allocation despite Singhalese-majority Sri Lanka ending a bloody civil war with Tamil rebels more than a decade ago.

The interim budget will be followed by a full-year budget for 2023, likely to be presented in November, where a broader recovery plan will be outlined.

“So, both those budgets will put out government policy. The first one on stabilization and the second one will look at recovery,” he said.

Overall, Wickremesinghe said he expects the economy, heavily reliant on tourism and tea, to see a recovery in the second half of 2023, reaching a revenue surplus of about 3 percent by 2025.

“I think we are restructuring to make Sri Lanka a very competitive, export-oriented economy,” he said.