Crown prince: Saudi Arabia committed to principles of Islam

Crown Prince Mohammed also praised the Kingdom's growth and prosperity under the leadership of King Salman, Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques. (SPA)
Updated 24 September 2018

Crown prince: Saudi Arabia committed to principles of Islam

  • The crown prince praised the Kingdom's growth and prosperity under the leadership of King Salman, Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques
  • His speech highlighted efforts of the Saudi people to achieve the objectives of Vision 2030

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia “will remain committed to the principles” of Islam, “the religion of tolerance and moderation,” Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said on Sunday in a speech to mark the Kingdom’s 88th National Day.
The Kingdom “will keep on fighting against extremism and terrorism,” and “we will not allow anyone to attack the sovereignty of our homeland or jeopardize its security,” he added.
The crown prince paid tribute to “the efforts of our countrymen in all fields, and most importantly our soldiers and security personnel.”
The 88th National Day is an opportunity to recall the achievements of the country’s founder King Abdul Aziz and his sons, the crown prince said, praising the nation’s growth and prosperity under King Salman.
“On our National Day, we take pride in our country’s position on an international, Islamic and Arab level,” the crown prince said.
He praised the Kingdom’s achievements of “security, regional and international peace” and “economic prosperity.”
Government agencies have established the principles of transparency and justice to promote integrity, fight corruption and achieve the goals of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 reform plan, he said.
Vision 2030 “looks forward to the future,” and seeks to place Saudi Arabia “at the forefront of countries with continuous follow-up, guidance and support from King Salman,” the crown prince added.
“This special occasion requires us to thank God for His generosity toward our country to serve the Two Holy Mosques and care for Hajj and Umrah pilgrims and visitors,” he said.
“That care was reflected in the great success of the last Hajj season and God’s continuous blessings to the Saudi government and its hospitable people,” as well as “its continuous concern for sustained development of holy lands and services” in order to ensure that pilgrimages can be performed with ease, he added.


Recent archaeological discoveries highlight Saudi Arabia as ‘a cradle of human civilizations,’ Rome conference told

Updated 06 December 2019

Recent archaeological discoveries highlight Saudi Arabia as ‘a cradle of human civilizations,’ Rome conference told

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has become a leader in the field of archaeological research in the past five years, a major exhibition in Rome was told.

Abdullah Al-Zahrani, director-general of archaeological research and studies at the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, said that 44 international archaeological missions had been carried out this year in the Kingdom.

He was speaking on the sidelines of the “Roads of Arabia: Masterpieces of Antiquities in Saudi Arabia Across the Ages” exhibition, which opened at the National Museum of Rome on Nov. 26.

The groundbreaking exhibition was inaugurated by Saudi Minister of Culture Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan and Italian Minister of Cultural Heritage and Activities Dario Franceschini.

Al-Zahrani said that the Kingdom “has become one of the most advanced countries in terms of archaeological disclosures.”

“Recent discoveries by local and international missions have highlighted the Kingdom’s historical status and cultural depth as the cradle of the beginnings of human civilizations,” he said.

Archaeological discoveries continue to “instil the civilized dimension of the Kingdom,” he said.

“The religious, political, economic and cultural stature that Saudi Arabia enjoys is an extension of its long cultural heritage, in addition to its distinctive geographical position as a bridge and hub of cultural interaction between East and West that made it a meeting point for international land and sea trade routes throughout all ages,” he added.