Globalization dominates WEF meeting in Dubai

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The UAE’s Minister of Cabinet Affairs Mohammed Al-Gergawi gave the opening remarks at the event. (World Economic Forum/CC-BY-SA)
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The UAE’s Minister of Cabinet Affairs Mohammed Al-Gergawi gave the opening remarks at the event. (World Economic Forum/CC-BY-SA)
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Updated 12 November 2018

Globalization dominates WEF meeting in Dubai

  • The two-day WEF conference is attended by more than 600 members of government, academia, civil society and business, as well as other fields
  • The event is a warm up to the WEF Annual Meeting in Davos in 2019

DUBAI: The World Economic Forum’s (WEF) annual meeting of the Global Future Councils (GFC) began in Dubai on Sunday, with globalization being the main theme tackled at this year’s seminar.
“The rise of populism, protectionism and nationalism have short-term benefits,” but history has shown they have “a detrimental impact,” Australian MP and former Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said at the opening plenary.
“How many times does history have to show us what industry subsidization does, or what protectionism and closing markets does, or what unaffordable support for welfare state does to a nation?” she asked.
The UAE’s Minister of Cabinet Affairs Mohammed Al-Gergawi gave the opening remarks at the event, saying the world now has four priorities: Collaboration and participation, new regulations, government productivity and staying open to globalization.
“Without globalization, we wouldn’t have seen the emergence of multitrillion-dollar corporations like Apple and Amazon that succeeded due to no states shutting its doors,” he said.


The opening panel, titled “Globalization 4.0,” included Bishop, Slovak Foreign Minister Miroslav Lajcak, Argentina’s former Foreign Minister Susana Malcorra, the president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, William Burns, and a visiting professor and fellow at Japan’s Musashino Institute for Global Affairs, Yoriko Kawaguchi. The panel was moderated by CNBC anchor and reporter Hadley Gamble.


Kawaguchi said several rapid changes are coming, such as technology that will need constant collaboration among countries.
“Technology is very important, and that will bring in many unknown challenges,” she added.

“To cope with some of these challenges, we’ll have to exchange our views, we’ll have to exchange our knowledge, we have to exchange our policies to deal with them, and we need to cooperate.”
Malcorra said while cooperation among states is important, the core of the problem lies with citizen representation and trust in their leadership.
“At the heart of what we’re facing here is the fact that the common citizen doesn’t feel… represented well enough by institutions, be they national or international,” she added.
“And there’s a break, in my view, in the social (contract) between citizens and their leadership.”

Lajcak said: “The link between leadership and citizens needs to be strengthened, and the communication has to run both ways.”
Burns said leaderships today need to understand the “very real anxieties that have driven the kind of anti-globalization atmosphere.”
Malcorra said countries need to adopt a “We First” model, taking a jab at US President Donald Trump’s slogan “America First.”
The two-day WEF conference is attended by more than 600 members of government, academia, civil society and business, as well as other fields.
It will address global, regional and geopolitical issues, and explore topics related to the “fourth industrial revolution.”
Most of the sessions will be off the record and not attended by the media. The event is a warm up to the WEF Annual Meeting in Davos in 2019.

Read Frank Kane's Big issues from the World Economic Forum’s intellectual heart here


Dubai carrier Emirates doubts Boeing 777x aircraft delivery in 2020

Updated 14 October 2019

Dubai carrier Emirates doubts Boeing 777x aircraft delivery in 2020

  • Emirates is a launch customer of the world’s biggest twin engined jet
  • The US planemaker suspended load testing of the plane when media reports said a cargo door failed a ground stress test

DUBAI: Emirates doubts it will receive any of the 115 Boeing 777-9s it has ordered next year, its president said on Monday, as the US planemaker grapples with challenges in building the jet.
Emirates, a launch customer of the world’s biggest twin engined jet, was to receive its first 777-9 in 2020 but the manufacturer has suspended load testing of the plane.
“... By the end of next year we were to have eight of them. Now it doesn’t look like we will have any,” Tim Clark said at a conference in Dubai.
Boeing suspended load testing of the new widebody in September when media reports said a cargo door failed a ground stress test. There have also been issues with General Electric Co’s new GE9X turbine engine that will power the jet.
Boeing has said it expects to hold the initial flight test in 2020 and is aiming for the 777X to enter commercial service in the same year.
Clark said he had told Boeing he insists on a 13- to 16-month test period for the new jet.
Emirates ordered 150 777X jets, including 777-8 variants, in 2013. It later placed a preliminary order for 40 Boeing 787 Dreamliner jets in 2017, which Clark said he still saw a place for in the airline’s fleet plans.
Boeing has also been unable to deliver any of its 737 MAX aircraft since the single-aisle plane was grounded worldwide in March after two fatal crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people.
Clark said in September Emirates would not take new Airbus and Boeing planes unless they were truly ready, and said that engine makers Rolls Royce and GE must improve their reliability.
Aircraft manufacturers should not over promise on new aircraft capability, he said on Monday.
Emirates has also signed deals for 40 Airbus A330-900s and 30 A350-900s.