Saudi visual artists take part in Qatif transformation project 

Misk Art Institute is one of Misk’s initiatives that seek to enrich the artistic culture and support creative experiences by organizing events that connect artists. (SPA)
Updated 15 April 2019

Saudi visual artists take part in Qatif transformation project 

  • Misk Art launches Tajalat initiative to promote national cohesion
  • Saudi artists excited over the opportunity to showcase Kingdom’s cultural diversity

QATIF, Eastern Province: The Misk Art Institute has launched Tajalat initiative in Qatif as part of the central Awamiyah project to bring together visual artists from all across Saudi Arabia to carry a message of love by promoting the rich culture and heritage of the Kingdom. 

Misk Art Institute is one of Misk’s initiatives that seek to enrich the artistic culture and support creative experiences by organizing events that connect artists. It is a cultural organization operating under the auspices of the Misk Foundation, established by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. 

The central Awamiyah project in Qatif was opened on Jan. 31 by the governor of Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province, Prince Saud bin Naif. Local Mayor Fahd Al-Jubair said he was delighted at the progress made in central Awamiyah, which he hailed as one of the most ambitious transformations in the Kingdom.

“The inauguration of the central Awamiyah project is a vital step in the comprehensive development of Qatif and its cities, so that it remains a cultural hub,” he said.

Twenty-two male and female visual artists are taking part in the initiative that will help transform the area into a jewel of Saudi urban heritage. Misk Arts Institute CEO Reem Sultan extended thanks to Qatif people for hosting the Tajalat initiative. She said the institute always works on initiatives that support art and artists throughout the Kingdom.  

The Saudi Press Agency quoted several artists as saying that the initiative is an extension of the success of its first edition that was launched as part of the Winter at Tantora cultural festival in Al-Ula. It aims to provide artists a platform to discuss the Saudi art scene and promote creative activities in the Kingdom, they said.

Munir Al-Hajji, a visual artist from Qatif, said the initiative is very important as it promotes different art forms and contributes to promoting the message of love and peace and showcases Saudi Arabia’s rich history and bright future through art.     

He said several artists from different parts of the Kingdom are taking part in the second season of the initiative. “Taking part in the initiative is an honor,” Al-Hajji said. He said the artists see this as an opportunity to their nation and to boost national cohesion.

Many artists see this event as an opportunity to promote the diverse culture of the Kingdom and to achieve unity through diversity.

Al-Hajji stressed the importance of organizing such events for the preservation of regional and national heritage.

Abdullah Al-Tamimi from Riyadh said the initiative carries a message of peace, security and love among Saudi citizens. He lauded the Misk Foundation for this initiative.

Visual artist Layla Nasrallah from Qatif said that organizing this initiative is a dream come true to the region’s young men and women. She said the participation of visual artists from all over the Kingdom represents a cultural dimension. “Art is a message and it is the responsibility of artists to deliver it to future generations,” she said.

Youssef bin Ahmed Jaha, an artist from Makkah, said such initiatives help enrich the creative experiences of artists.

Visual Artist Sima Abed Al-Hay from Qatif stressed the importance of the initiative that constitutes a new beginning featuring the cultural and heritage aspect of the Kingdom.

Visual Artist Zaman Jassem from Qatif was delighted at the participation of so many visual artists, who got the opportunity to showcase their work through the Tajalat initiative. 

He said the initiative reflects the diverse cultures thriving across the Kingdom. Jassem said the initiative aims to promote humanitarianism and development and it seeks to promote peace and harmony.

 

QATIF, Eastern Province: The Misk Art Institute has launched Tajalat initiative in Qatif as part of the central Awamiyah project to bring together visual artists from all across Saudi Arabia to carry a message of love by promoting the rich culture and heritage of the Kingdom. 

Saudi visual artists take part in Qatif transformation project 

 


Saudi labor minister urges Kingdom to increase economic role of charity sector

Updated 2 min 21 sec ago

Saudi labor minister urges Kingdom to increase economic role of charity sector

  • Saudi Minister of Labor and Social Development Ahmad Al-Rajhi said: “Our effort is to increase the share of the non-profit sector in GDP”
  • “This sector, together with its substantial developmental roles, has become a criterion for the overall progress of nations and a yardstick of their civilization and humanitarian activity rather than a mere indicator of individuals’ income”

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia needed to increase the contribution of the non-profit sector to the Kingdom’s economic and social development, the country’s labor minister told business conference delegates on Thursday.

Moderating a session on the subject during the final day of the Riyadh Economic Forum (REF), Saudi Minister of Labor and Social Development Ahmad Al-Rajhi said: “Our effort is to increase the share of the non-profit sector in GDP.”

Describing the non-profit sector as the third pillar of sustainable economic development, the minister pointed out that in developed countries its average contribution toward GDP had reached 6 percent.

Referring to a REF study on the sector, he noted that it was only during the last decade that the Kingdom had come to realize its important role in economic development, social participation, job creation, and promoting the culture of teamwork.

“The non-profit sector contributes to Saudi Arabia’s GDP by one percent and our effort is to increase the share,” Al-Rajhi told the session’s attendees.

Presenting the REF study, Yousef bin Othman Al-Huzeim, secretary-general of Al-Anoud Charitable Foundation, said: “This sector, together with its substantial developmental roles, has become a criterion for the overall progress of nations and a yardstick of their civilization and humanitarian activity rather than a mere indicator of individuals’ income.”

He added that the sector had a key part to play in helping to realize the Saudi Vision 2030 goal of achieving sustainable development through diversification, and that the aim was to raise its level of contribution to the country’s GDP from 1 percent to 5 percent by 2030.

The study stressed the need to transform the sector from a mere initiative into an institutional entity concerned with social investment and integration, in cooperation with the public and private sectors.

Among its key findings, the study highlighted the requirement to increase the awareness of sector employees and supervising agencies about the development needs of society.

A lack of detailed information on the non-profit sector in the Kingdom was also having a negative effect on the extent of its contribution to economic and social development, the study found.

The media too had failed to give enough coverage to the sector and rules and regulations often stood in the way of any expansion in individual and community partnerships through charities and trusts.

Princess Nouf bint Mohammed Al-Saud, CEO of the King Khalid Foundation (KKF), said women were the most important enablers of the non-profit sector.

Currently, the most prominent development was the system of NGOs and philanthropic associations, and the stimulation of the sector to implement good governance, she added.

The princess urged the lifting of restrictions on money transfers to the non-profit sector and tax exemptions on charities and donations.

The KKF had issued a number of regulations to help the non-profit sector, she said, but there was still a need for the creation of more executive programs in order to realize Vision 2030 goals.

Rajaa bin Manahi Al-Marzouqi, a professor of economics at Prince Saud Al-Faisal Institute for Diplomatic Studies, in Riyadh, said: “If we look at any economy, it consists of three important sectors, which are the government, private, and non-profit sectors. There is a need to develop the non-profit sector in such a way that it sustains in the long run and contributes to socio-economic development.”