Saudi Bank customers warned of online fraudsters

Saudi Banks has warned customers not to respond to such fraudulent emails. (Shutterstock)
Updated 15 July 2019

Saudi Bank customers warned of online fraudsters

  • Those indulging in fraudulence will be fined up to SR2 million ($530,000) or given sentences of up to 3 years in prison

RIYADH: Fraudsters are now applying innovative ways to cheat people via email.

They used to make mobile calls and send texts or messages via WhatsApp, but now they are sending emails bearing bank logos and asking users to update accounts, even seeking personal information.

The banking service organization Saudi Banks has warned customers not to respond to such fraudulent emails.

Talat Zaki Hafiz, secretary-general of the committee on information and banking awareness of Saudi Banks, said: “Saudi Banks has repeatedly warned customers against responding to a series of emails that have recently appeared from anonymous sources with local bank logos.”

It has issued security alerts telling customers not to update their bank accounts in response to fraudulent email messages pretending to do system maintenance or to letters claiming to be from official or public names, requesting funds or donations, he told Arab News.

Hafiz said that Saudi Banks has no role in pursuing and tracking the source of these fraudulent messages. However, the Communications and Information Technology Commission (CITC) has allocated the number 330330 for notifying the authorities, who will act quickly.

Those indulging in fraudulence will be fined up to SR2 million ($530,000) or given sentences of up to 3 years in prison. A spokesman for Saudi Banks said there were no statistics on the number of phishing messages received by customers, as some people did not report them.

He expressed confidence in the awareness of customers and their active participation with relevant authorities to address such issues.

Telecom providers, including Saudi Telecom Co., have also warned their customers to ignore such messages and not to share personal details. 

A warning was also issued by the STC for customers to avoid logging on to their banks online via public Wi-Fi hotspots, calling on users to disable data sharing on their devices as a precautionary measure.


King Salman urges Iran to junk its expansionist ideology

Updated 21 November 2019

King Salman urges Iran to junk its expansionist ideology

  • Saudi Arabia has suffered from the policies and practices of the Iranian regime and its proxies, king says
  • Kingdom also welcomed US decision to return Iran's Fordow nuclear facility to its sanctions list

RIYADH: Iran should abandon its expansionist ideology that has only “harmed” its own people, Saudi Arabia's King Salman said on Wednesday, following violent street protests in the Islamic republic.

A wave of demonstrations erupted in the sanctions-hit country on Friday after an announcement that petrol prices would be raised by as much as 200 percent with immediate effect.

“We hope the Iranian regime chooses the side of wisdom and realizes there is no way to overcome the international position that rejects its practices, without abandoning its expansionist and destructive thinking that has harmed its own people,” the king told the consultative Shoura Council.

“The kingdom has suffered from the policies and practices of the Iranian regime and its proxies,” King Salman said, quoted by the foreign ministry, reiterating that Riyadh does not seek war but is “ready to defend its people.”

A satellite image from Sept. 15, 2017, of the Fordow nuclear facility in Iran. (Google Earth)

Saudi Arabia has welcomed Washington's decision to return the Fordow nuclear facility in Iran to the sanctions list. 

Washington said on Monday that it will no longer waive sanctions related to Iran’s Fordow nuclear plant after Tehran resumed uranium enrichment at the underground site. 

“The right amount of uranium enrichment for the world’s largest state sponsor of terror is zero ... There is no legitimate reason for Iran to resume enrichment at this previously clandestine site,” US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told reporters earlier this week.