BIENALSUR 2019 concluding its 2nd edition in Riyadh after traveling across 23 countries

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Hailing from South America, Bienalsur is the first world-traveling contemporary art biennale. It began in 2016 in Buenos Aires before finally ending in Riyadh. (Photo/Supplied)
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Hailing from South America, Bienalsur is the first world-traveling contemporary art biennale. It began in 2016 in Buenos Aires before finally ending in Riyadh. (Photo/Supplied)
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Hailing from South America, Bienalsur is the first world-traveling contemporary art biennale. It began in 2016 in Buenos Aires before finally ending in Riyadh. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 01 December 2019

BIENALSUR 2019 concluding its 2nd edition in Riyadh after traveling across 23 countries

  • The Riyadh show, hosted by the Ministry of Culture, is the international exhibition’s first stop in Middle East

RIYADH: The biennale event is hosted by the Ministry of Culture within the Quality of Life Program in collaboration with National University of Tres de Febrero, Argentina. The grand opening for the biennale was on Nov. 5 and it will run until Dec. 5

The second edition of the world’s first contemporary travel art biennial “BIENALSUR 2019” will be closing its 2019 edition in Riyadh after traveling across five continents and 43 cities in 23 countries. 

During its global tour, it showcased works of 400 artists in more than 100 venues worldwide.

The exhibition featured several international artists, four of whom are Saudi: Fatima Al-Banawi, Sara Abu Abdallah, Faisal Samra and Ayman Zedani, showcasing their creativity to the world with 16 masterpieces. 

Biennale is an Italian word that translates to “once every two years.” 

But what makes BIENALSUR special is that this biennale travels around the world, aiming to strengthen cultural ties through art works.

Hailing from South America, it is the first world-traveling contemporary art biennale.

The first edition started in 2016, and the second edition launched in June. 

It started in Buenos Aires before finally ending in Riyadh, the first stop in the Middle East.

Being a part of the BIENALSUR journey supports the Kingdom’s 2030 Vision reform plans and the Ministry of Culture’s ambitions by highlighting Saudi culture through contemporary art.

“Our participation in this edition of BIENALSUR is helping to build bridges of understanding between cultures. Dialogue is so important. I am delighted that our talented Saudi artists can be part of creating that dialogue,” said Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan Al-Saud, minister of culture.

The second edition — titled “Restoring Stories, Restoring Imagination” — invites the audience to explore contemporary art and have an experience that reflects their own lives. 

The works in the biennale encourage intercultural dialogue and understanding through providing the audience an unforgettable experience.

A blink of an eye

The reason behind Fatima Al-Banawi calling her work “A blink of an eye” is because major changes happen in our lives within a blink of an eye. It is a video performance piece that shares five stories from the other story project.

It highlights many people’s stories in a way when the audience see it they think it is one person’s story, but in reality it is a collection of many.

“I want to personalize the lives of others, and that is why it is called the other story,” Al-Banawi said. “When we separated ourselves from the screen of our phones, we think that these experiences only happen to these people, but not to us, and through the installation the viewer can interact with a story in a deeper way.”

HIGHLIGHTS

• BIENALSUR 2019 will be closing its 2019 edition in Riyadh after traveling across five continents and 43 cities in 23 countries.

• Four Saudi nationals were among several international artists featured in the exhibition.

• Saudi artists Fatima Al-Banawi, Sara Abu Abdallah, Faisal Samra and Ayman Zedani, are showcasing their creativity to the world with 16 masterpieces.

• The event is hosted by the Ministry of Culture within the Quality of Life Program in collaboration with National University of Tres de Febrero, Argentina.

• The grand opening was on Nov. 5 and it will run until Dec. 5

“When I work on storytelling, I am speaking in a universal language, and through the Vision 2030 Saudi Arabia is addressing a universal language by using arts, culture, storytelling and filmmaking to speak to the local and the global society,” Al-Banawi said.

“One thing I always remind myself and my colleagues is to go ‘glocal’ — going local but also global, when you go glocal you are real, raw and original. You have pride in your heritage. You are not following any international standard. When you go local you go real, and when you go real you can go international,” she said.

Azal

Ayman Zedani’s work explores how time is tangible. “I turn time into a physical element,” said Zedani.

Zedani has an outstanding way of turning time to a physical masterpiece, which the audience can interact with.

“Azal” is an interactive installation that records time in a physical way. It highlights how time can be tangible. The installation is made of dyed liquid poured inside pottery cups. The ink bleeds through the cup, ensuring that the process is an active part of the art. 

This process means that no two cups are identical, they are different patterns that emerged from the ink seeping into the two cups. 

The result is an object that acts as a timing piece, archiving the ink-seeping process.


Organization of Islamic Cooperation to adopt Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam

Updated 28 February 2020

Organization of Islamic Cooperation to adopt Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam

  • OIC secretary-general notes that the organization continues to condemn the ideological rhetoric adopted by terrorist groups

JEDDAH: Secretary-General of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) Dr. Yousef bin Ahmad Al-Othaimeen announced on Wednesday that the OIC will adopt the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam (CDHRI) after it is revised in accordance with international human-rights standards. The foreign ministers of the OIC member states are expected to approve the CDHRI at their meeting in Niamey, Niger in April.

 Al-Othaimeen was speaking at the 43rd session of the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC), held in Geneva on Wednesday, where he highlighted some of the efforts the OIC has made to fight racism and xenophobia — including Islamophobia — claiming that they are the result of “intellectual and political resistance to cultural pluralism.”

He said the OIC, in cooperation with its partners, has prepared “a comprehensive and consensual approach to address incitement to hatred, discrimination and violence on the basis of religion.”

Al-Othaimeen’s speech, which was delivered on his behalf by OIC Geneva Permanent Representative Nassima Baghli, stressed that terrorism, including religious extremism, is a major source of concern for the international community. He pointed out that the OIC continues to condemn the ideological rhetoric adopted by terrorist groups and has established the Sawt Al-Hikma (Voice of Wisdom) Center, which focuses on addressing the ideological rhetoric of extremists.

His speech also reviewed the most common human-rights violations suffered by Muslims, referring to the detailed documentation from the UN’s own human rights bodies and the OIC of discrimination and violence against the Rohingya Muslims.

Al-Othaimeen explained that America’s actions in Palestine in recent months required the OIC to stress that any peace initiative between Israel and Palestine must be consistent with legitimate rights, foremost among which is the right to self-determination.

He also stressed the OIC’s support for Kashmiris in their pursuit of their legitimate right to self-determination in accordance with international resolutions and highlighted the OIC’s condemnation of Armenia’s continued occupation of Nagorno-Karabakh and seven regions bordering Azerbaijan.