Libya health ministry: Airstrike in Tripoli kills 4 children

Smoke rises during heavy clashes between rival factions in Tripoli, Libya, August 28, 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 02 December 2019

Libya health ministry: Airstrike in Tripoli kills 4 children

  • The Health Ministry says the airstrike took place on Sunday in the Al-Sawani neighborhood
  • Tripoli has been the scene of fighting since April

CAIRO: Libyan health authorities say an airstrike has hit a civilian area in a southern Tripoli neighborhood, killing at least four children.
The Libyan capital has been the scene of fighting since April between the self-styled Libyan National Army and an array of militias allied with the UN-supported but weak government which holds Tripoli.
The Tripoli-based health ministry says the airstrike took place on Sunday in the Al-Sawani neighborhood, about 30 kilometers, or 18 miles, from the city center.
The ministry’s spokesman Malek Merset says the strike wounded a fifth child. The interior ministry blamed the Libyan National Army for the airstrike.
Fighting has stalled in recent weeks, with both sides dug in and shelling one another along Tripoli’s southern reaches. Hundreds have been killed and thousands displaced in the fighting.


Dubai airport hands out roses to Beirut passengers in a show of support

Updated 09 August 2020

Dubai airport hands out roses to Beirut passengers in a show of support

  • Passengers arriving from Beirut in Dubai were handed white roses
  • “Rebuilding Lebanon is like rebuilding UAE,” a message attached to the roses read

DUBAI: Passengers arriving from Beirut in Dubai were handed white roses on Sunday in a heartfelt gesture of support following last week’s deadly blast. 
The 163 passengers boarding an Emirates airline flight who arrived at Dubai International Airport were gifted the roses from Dubai Customs workers. The flowers came with a message that quoted the founder of the UAE, the late President Sheikh Zayed Al-Nahyan.
The message reads: “Rebuilding Lebanon is like rebuilding UAE.”
Dubai Airport CEO Paul Griffiths said the act reflects the “spirit of kindness at the heart of the aviation community.”  
“I’m sure it has provided some measure of comfort for the Lebanese passengers during these very difficult times,” he said.
Like many other countries, the UAE has sent large shipments of aid to Lebanon since the explosion. 
The massive blasts at the Beirut port killed 158 people and injured 6,000.