Emirates suspends Nigerian and some Europe, US flights

Emirates airline officials attend to passengers leaving Lagos, Nigeria. The airline is expected to suspend flights to and from the West African nation imminently. (Reuters)
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Updated 22 March 2020

Emirates suspends Nigerian and some Europe, US flights

  • German and French routes cut, along with New York and New Jersey, as pandemic continues

DUBAI: Emirates, one of the world’s biggest international airlines, is suspending all flights to France and Germany, Nigeria, and New York and New Jersey in the US, due to the coronavirus outbreak, according to internal emails seen by Reuters.

The state-owned airline has already suspended dozens of international routes, crucial to its Dubai hub that is dependent on millions of passengers passing through it every year.

Flights to France, Germany and Nigeria would be suspended from March 23, until further notice, a company email said.

Emirates operates services to French cities of Paris, Lyon and Nice, Germany’s Frankfurt, Munich, Duesseldorf and Hamburg, and Nigeria’s Abuja and Lagos.

Flights to New York JFK and New Jersey’s Newark EWR would be suspended from March 24 until further notice, another company email said.

Emirates did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The airline said in the emails it was suspending the flights because of measures and restrictions imposed to control the spread of the deadly virus.

Abu Dhabi’s Etihad Airways said on Saturday it was suspending flights to Pakistan’s Karachi, Islamabad and Lahore from March 21, Belgium’s Brussels from March 22 and Switzerland’s Zurich from March 24.

Governments around the world have imposed tight entry requirements and in some instances suspended flights.

The UAE, which has reported 140 cases of the virus, including two deaths, has temporarily banned all foreigners from entering the country, including residents.

Middle East airlines are facing a liquidity crisis, putting hundreds of thousands of jobs across the region at risk because of the virus epidemic that has shattered global travel demand, the industry’s largest body warned on Thursday.


Oil falls as rising virus cases overshadow demand recovery

An oil tanker ship at a port in Burgas, Bulgaria. Most market participants expect more downward pressure on oil, with COVID-19 ravaging the landscape. (Shutterstock)
Updated 05 August 2020

Oil falls as rising virus cases overshadow demand recovery

  • Declines come after WTI rose 1.8% and Brent climbed 1.5% on Monday; renewed lockdowns weigh on prices

LONDON: Oil prices eased on Tuesday on concerns that a fresh wave of COVID-19 infections will hamper a global demand recovery just as major producers ramp up output.

US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were down 67 cents, or 1.6 percent, at $40.34 a barrel, while Brent crude dropped 71 cents, or 1.6 percent, to $43.44.
The declines come after WTI rose 1.8 percent and Brent climbed 1.5 percent on Monday on better than expected data on manufacturing activity in Asia, Europe and the United States.
News from Asia and Europe is adding to concerns that the infection crisis may be spreading in a global second wave, not just in the United States and Brazil, said Paola Rodriguez Masiu of Rystad Energy.

HIGHLIGHTS

• News from Asia and Europe is adding to concerns that the infection crisis may be spreading in a global second wave, not just in the United States and Brazil, said Paola Rodriguez Masiu of Rystad Energy.

• Producers in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and its allies, together known as OPEC+, are raising output this month, adding about 1.5 million barrels per day of supply.

• Analysts estimate that US refined product stockpiles rose last week, according to a preliminary poll ahead of data from the American Petroleum Institute and the US government on Wednesday.

Denting fuel demand, cities from Manila to Melbourne are tightening lockdowns to battle new infections, while Norway has stopped cruise ship traffic in the latest European travel alarm.
In a further sign of a patchy rebound in demand, analysts estimate that US refined product stockpiles rose last week, according to a preliminary Reuters poll ahead of data from the American Petroleum Institute and the US government on Wednesday.
At the same time, producers in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and its allies, together known as OPEC+, are raising output this month, adding about 1.5 million barrels per day of supply. US producers also plan to restart shut-in production.
“Most oil market participants expect more downward pressure on oil ... with COVID-19 ravaging the landscape and OPEC+ adding more barrels into play,” said Stephen Innes, Chief Global Markets Strategist at AxiCorp.