Olympics delay deals setback to Samsung’s Japanese plans

Olympics delay deals setback to Samsung’s Japanese plans
The postponement of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics due to the coronavirus, has sent shockwaves throughout the sporting world, but also the business world. (AFP)
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Updated 28 March 2020

Olympics delay deals setback to Samsung’s Japanese plans

Olympics delay deals setback to Samsung’s Japanese plans
  • The delay may mean the South Korean tech giant has lost a crucial window of opportunity

SEOUL: For Samsung Electronics, the 2020 Tokyo Olympics was going to be its springboard to a long-held goal — significant inroads into Japan’s lucrative smartphone market, where Apple Inc. dominates.

But after the Games were postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic, the long-time sponsor’s marketing plans — centered on its new S20 smartphone — have gone awry.

The delay may mean the South Korean tech giant has lost a crucial window of opportunity. It had been expected to tout its 5G capability in its Olympics ads, aiming to attract a population excited to watch the Games with cutting-edge technology before Apple had a 5G product on the market.

“Samsung was keen to use the Olympics opportunity in Japan. In that sense, it’s a bad situation,” a person familiar with Samsung’s operations told Reuters.

“A lot of the momentum for smartphone demand in the lead-up to the Olympics will also be gone.”

HIGHLIGHT

  • Samsung may have lost opportunity to take early lead in 5G.
  • Japan long an Apple stronghold, Samsung has 4% market share.
  • Experts expect Samsung campaign to reset around a new phone.

Former Samsung officials and analysts said it would likely go back to the drawing board to promote a new flagship phone due next year.

When asked about the impact of the Olympics postponement on its strategy for the Japan market, Samsung declined to comment, saying only it would continue to provide innovative technology for Japanese customers regardless of when the Games commence.

Samsung may be the world’s No. 1 smartphone maker by volume but it has just a fraction of the Japanese market.

In contrast, Apple which first began selling the iPhone in Japan in 2008, gained share thanks to an aggressive advertising and pricing campaign from SoftBank — at the time its sole distributor. Japan has since become a loyal premium market and key profit center for the US firm.

Apple currently commands 53 percent of the Japanese market, Sharp Corp. has 12 percent and Sony Corp. has 7 percent, according to Counterpoint Research. Samsung, which has lost ground since 2013, has 4 percent.

Indicative of Samsung’s struggles was its 2015 decision to drop its name from smartphones sold in Japan and just go with Galaxy branding — the only market where it does so. It’s a move some analysts attribute to historical tensions that often flare up between South Korea and its neighbor.

“I believe they did so due to the growing number of Japanese consumers who take political factors into account in their purchases,” said Shengtao Jin, a research analyst at Canalys.

In its run at Apple’s stronghold, Samsung had laid the groundwork for a concerted campaign.

In March last year, it opened the world’s biggest Galaxy store in Harajuku, Tokyo’s popular shopping district for youth fashion and pop culture. Boasting eight floors, the glitzy building has an exterior decorated with more than 1,000 smartphones. Samsung’s mobile and network division chief Koh Dong-jin, officials from the International Olympic Committee and Tokyo 2020 organizers attended the opening ceremony to mark 500 days until the Games.

Then in May, Samsung’s heir and de facto head, Jay. Y Lee traveled to Japan, meeting with executives from mobile carriers NTT DoCoMo Inc. and KDDI Corp. to discuss 5G cooperation.

DoCoMo and SoftBank Corp, the domestic telecom arm of SoftBank Group, are currently rolling out 5G services. But the delay of the Games means 5G is not expected to gain momentum until Apple launches a 5G-capable iPhone, analysts said.

That phone is expected to arrive by end-2020, though some media reports have said it may be delayed by the pandemic.

“Samsung could have taken an early lead in 5G but the Games postponement is a setback,” said Jeong Ok-hyun, a former LG mobile executive and a professor at Sogang University in Seoul.

“The virus could also lead to delays in the development of the 5G market, which will be a relief to Apple.”

For the time being, it remains to be seen if Samsung will proceed with plans to sell a special Olympics edition S2v0 phwone with 5G capability. The phone to be sold by DoCoMo was due to be launched in June and Samsung began taking pre-orders this month.

 


Pace of CEO resignations at listed KSA firms picked up amid pandemic

The largest number of resignations in one company was four within three years. (SPA)
The largest number of resignations in one company was four within three years. (SPA)
Updated 13 min 21 sec ago

Pace of CEO resignations at listed KSA firms picked up amid pandemic

The largest number of resignations in one company was four within three years. (SPA)
  • Three quarters of the resignations were attributed to special circumstances while 8 percent left for other roles

RIYADH: Saudi Arabian listed companies lost CEOs at twice the average annual pace in the first half of the year as the stresses of the pandemic took their toll.  
There were 128 CEO resignations from 97 companies listed on the Tadawul’s main and parallel markets over the past five years for an average of about 25 a year, according to a study by the Capital Market Authority (CMA). However, 26 CEOs resigned in the past six months, Maaal newspaper reported. The largest number of resignations over the past five years came from the telecommunications sector and the real estate management and development sector with six and 13 resignations, respectively, the study showed.
Three quarters of the resignations were attributed to special circumstances while 8 percent left for other roles. The largest number of resignations in one company was four within three years.
Developing the Saudi market to align with Vision 2030 requires good investment tools and excellent financial results, and the pandemic revealed the inability of some executive departments in some companies, in dealing with the risks and changes occurring, and the lack of capabilities to help them lead companies, Faiz Alhomrani, a financial market analyst told Arab News.

HIGHLIGHT

The largest number of resignations over the past five years came from the telecommunications sector and the real estate management and development sector with six and 13 resignations, respectively, the study showed.

Companies’ shareholders started to see that some CEOs or executive departments did not provide anything, and they couldn’t achieve positive results, neither in financial results nor in cash distributions, during three to four years, Alhomrani said.
“I think four years for a CEO is enough time to be evaluated,” he said.
The number of resignations in 2017 and 2020 was the highest during the study period (2016-2020), which may be attributed to unfavorable economic conditions during those years, with 45 percent of year 2020 resignations occurring in the fourth quarter.
Previous studies confirm that the biggest reason behind forced resignations is the company’s poor performance, CMA said.
The Saudi market today has moved from an internal local market to a global market and has begun to be closely linked to global markets, thus if CEOs have not new ideas, they will have to resign, said Alhomrani.
Major Saudi companies to have lost a CEO last year include STC, Almarai, Savola, Sipchem, Petrochem, Samba, Alinma Bank, Bank Aljazira, NCB and ANB.


How Islamic finance can help build a better future for all

Islamic finance products ‘aim to reduce the risk of asymmetric information and are contract-based, making them a natural fit for investors.’ (Shutterstock)
Islamic finance products ‘aim to reduce the risk of asymmetric information and are contract-based, making them a natural fit for investors.’ (Shutterstock)
Updated 22 min 56 sec ago

How Islamic finance can help build a better future for all

Islamic finance products ‘aim to reduce the risk of asymmetric information and are contract-based, making them a natural fit for investors.’ (Shutterstock)
  • Shariah-compliant finance is a rapidly growing industry that prioritizes sustainable expansion

LONDON: The Islamic finance investment model is a natural fit for investors looking to use their money ethically and sustainably, and could be a key
industry in helping the world to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), experts have told Arab News.

Islamic finance takes a different approach from today’s profit-above-all investment orthodoxy.
It prioritizes low-risk investments, and avoids markets such as pork, alcohol and gambling — as well as barring the payment of interest and ensuring ethical governance.
Far from impeding growth, however, this alternative approach to investing is rapidly evolving into a booming industry, Martina Macpherson, senior vice president of partnerships and engagement at Moody’s ESG Solutions Group, told Arab News.
She and her team expect the industry to hold over $4 trillion in assets by 2030.
“Islamic finance (will) continue to expand in the next decade across regions and asset classes, and there is an opportunity for Islamic Finance and Shariah-compliant investments to align with the UN Sustainable Development Goals,” she said.
Aligned with Saudi Arabia’s own Vision 2030, the SDGs lay out a vision of a just, fair and prosperous world by 2030, codified into 17 interlinked goals designed by the UN as a “blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all.”
The growth of Islamic finance as an alternative investment model will help to meet these goals in two ways: By uncovering sustainable and ethical opportunities and by reducing risk, she said.
The “SDGs and Islamic finance share joint values and fundamentals,” she said. “They are ethically linked, asset-backed, focused on risk and opportunity management, and centered on good governance as well as stakeholder impact.”

FASTFACTS

• Islamic finance products a ‘natural fit’ for meeting the UN sustainable development goals — Moody’s.

• The growth of Islamic finance as an alternative investment model will help to meet these goals through uncovering sustainable and ethical opportunities and by reducing risk, says expert.

“Islamic finance products aim to reduce the risk of asymmetric information and are contract-based, making them a natural fit for institutional investors committed to positive impact.”
Much like the Kingdom’s Vision 2030, one of the central goals of the SDGs is to tackle climate change, and this is “one of the key areas for Islamic finance to synchronize with the SDGs,” Macpherson said.
Stella Cox, managing director of Islamic finance intermediary firm DDCAP Group, speaking with Arab News, echoed Macpherson’s views on the role that Islamic finance can play in addressing issues like climate change. She emphasized, however, the importance of developing “a set of common standards, laws and regulations that will ensure shared best practice” moving toward 2030.
This cooperation, she said, “should be perceived as opportunity, rather than challenge, and that opportunity will enable Shariah compliant firms to work more closely with others in addressing and providing solutions for the biggest environmental and social challenges that the world has ever faced.”
Samina Akram, managing director of Samak Ethical Finance, told Arab News that the importance of ethical investing has only grown as the millennial generation have been “exposed to the harsh realities of the conventional financial system” in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis.
They have been turned off conventional investing by “bad governance, bad leadership, casino type banking, and a lack of transparency,” Akram said.
And critically, she added, “they want no part to play in damaging the environment.”


UAE to build waste-to-energy plants to burn two thirds of trash

UAE to build waste-to-energy plants to burn two thirds of trash
Updated 30 July 2021

UAE to build waste-to-energy plants to burn two thirds of trash

UAE to build waste-to-energy plants to burn two thirds of trash
  • Dubai is building a $1.1 billion waste-to-energy plant
  • Sharjah, Abu Dhabi also constructing facilities

RIYADH: The UAE plans to build a series of waste incinerators that will eventually burn up to two thirds of the country’s trash to deal with a growing refuse problem.

Dubai is constructing a $1.1 billion waste-to-energy facility, one of the largest in the world, while a smaller plant in being built in Sharjah and will begin operation this year, Bloomberg reported. Two further projects are being built in Abu Dhabi.

Burning trash creates carbon emissions, potentially making it harder for the UAE to reach its target of becoming carbon neutral by 2050.

However, Bee’ah, Sharjah’s waste company, will try to mitigate this by creating green spaces, install a 120-MW solar array on top of the plant and produce hydrogen from the garbage to fuel its rubbish trucks. Sharjah will also be able to close its landfill site.

Bee’ah CEO Khaled Al Huraimel said he wants to export the model across the region, including Saudi Arabia.

While environmentalist favor recycling over burning of trash, turning plastics and other waste into usable products is extremely challenging.

China’s recent ban on the importation of waste “has really changed the economic drivers,” said Mr.John Ord, a UK business director at engineering firm Stantec. “All of a sudden, we have a lot of waste that needs to be dealt with.”


Bitcoin tests the $40k resistance level

Bitcoin tests the $40k resistance level
Updated 30 July 2021

Bitcoin tests the $40k resistance level

Bitcoin tests the $40k resistance level

RIYADH: Bitcoin traded higher on Thursday, rising by 0.03 percent to $39,670.54 at 4:02 p.m. Riyadh time. Ether, the second-most traded global cryptocurrency, was up 0.44 percent to $2,291.72.05, according to data from CoinDesk.

Below is the latest news from the world of cryptocurrency:

Bitcoin buyers have been profitable, as the cryptocurrency tests the $40,000 resistance level. Sentiment has improved significantly over the past week, although some analysts believe it is time to pause before rallying again.

In a CoinDesk report, Justin Chuh, a senior trader at Wave Financial, said: “Bitcoin easily broke through $35,000, but I think it will probably have a harder time going through $40,000 this time.”

But attitudes could easily shift from bullish to bearish as bitcoin was still in a consolidation phase with strong resistance, the report added.

HIGHLIGHT

Bitcoin buyers have been profitable, as the cryptocurrency tests the $40,000 resistance level. Sentiment has improved significantly over the past week, although some analysts believe it is time to pause before rallying again.

Meanwhile, in a research paper published on Wednesday, Bank of America described central bank digital currencies as a more efficient payment system than cash. The second-largest bank in the US by total assets, said that digital central bank currencies could completely replace cash in the distant future.

A report released in May by blockchain infrastructure platform Bison Trails found that around 80 percent of central banks were exploring using digital currencies, with CoinDesk reporting that 40 percent were already testing proof-of-concept programs.

London-based Fabric Ventures has closed a $130 million fund to invest in early stage blockchain companies. One of its supporters is the European Investment Fund, which provided $30 million, marking the first time a European Commission company had invested in a fund focused on digital assets, said CoinDesk.

Stock and cryptocurrency trading app Robinhood has received a $32 billion valuation with its initial public offering and was set to debut on the Nasdaq on Thursday.

In a press statement on Wednesday, Robinhood priced its offering at $38 per Class A common share. The price is at the lower end of the $38 to $42 share price range that the company had targeted, and it planned to sell 5.5 million shares targeting an increase of $1.89 billion.

The firm is trying to reshape its image and said it was working on a new feature that would help protect users from cryptocurrency price volatility, while hiring a former Google graduate to improve the overall product design, according to CoinDesk.


Arab celebrity message app Yela raises $2.2 million funding

Yela has secured over a hundred A-list celebrities who fans can connect with, including Amr Diab. (Supplied)
Yela has secured over a hundred A-list celebrities who fans can connect with, including Amr Diab. (Supplied)
Updated 30 July 2021

Arab celebrity message app Yela raises $2.2 million funding

Yela has secured over a hundred A-list celebrities who fans can connect with, including Amr Diab. (Supplied)
  • The interactions on the platform can range from direct text messages to video clips

JEDDAH: Yela, a platform allowing users to get personalised video messages from their favorite Arab celebrities, has secured $2.2 million in funding, it was announced on Thursday.

Set to launched in August, Yela secured funding from US and UK investors with offices in London, Cairo, and Dubai. Participating from Silicon Valley is Razmig Hoghavian, a board member of Rakuten and General Partner at Graph Ventures.

The application was founded by Alex Eid, who said in a statement: “It’s incredible to see the support that Yela has already received from all sides, investors, celebrity creators, and fans.”

The first round of funding was also led by US investors Justin Mateen, a co-founder of Tinder and the General Partner of JAM Fund, and Sean Rad, a general partner at RAD Fund and also a co-founder of Tinder.

Yela has secured over a hundred A-list celebrities who fans can connect with including Amr Diab, Haifa Wehbe, Youssra, Mohamed Henedy, and Ahmed AlSakka. The interactions on the platform can range from direct text messages to video clips, with prices starting from $100.