UAE allows FlyDubai to transport Britons to UK

ubai Airports and Abu Dhabi Airport suspended all passenger flights last Thursday for two weeks, with the exception of evacuation flights. (File/AFP)
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Updated 28 March 2020

UAE allows FlyDubai to transport Britons to UK

  • The flight will land in Croatia’s capital Zagreb, which will allow the British citizens to board a transit flight direct to London
  • ubai Airports and Abu Dhabi Airport suspended all passenger flights last Thursday for two weeks, with the exception of evacuation flights

LONDON: Dozens of British nationals left the Emirates on a FlyDubai flight on Saturday, the UK embassy in the UAE said.
“32 Brits left the UAE on FlyDubai this am,” the embassy said in a tweet. “The airports are closed but some airlines are being granted permission for departures. Do not head to the airport without a flight booked. We are working with the UAE Government and airlines to progress all options to get you home,” the tweet added.

The flight will land in Croatia’s capital Zagreb, which will allow the British citizens to board a transit flight direct to London.
On Friday, the embassy tweeted an “urgent message” to British nationals that the FlyDubai flight to Zagreb was open for bookings.

According to the UK government website’s page on UK citizens stranded in the UAE, citizens were urged to contact airlines or tour operators regarding any possible return flights. 
“The British Embassy is in constant contact with the local authorities, airlines and other diplomatic missions to explore all possible avenues,” it read.
The British Ambassador to the UAE Patrick Moody tweeted a statement echoing the website.
“Many of you are awaiting refunds following the cancelation of flights. My team are speaking to airlines to emphasise how urgent this is.”

Dubai Airports and Abu Dhabi Airport suspended all passenger flights last Thursday for two weeks, with the exception of evacuation flights, as part of measures to contain the spread of the coronavirus.
The latest statements from the UAE’s main airports came after the government announced early on Monday that all passenger and transit flights to and from the country would be suspended after 48 hours.


So-called honor killing of teen girl brings outcry in Iran

Updated 27 May 2020

So-called honor killing of teen girl brings outcry in Iran

  • Iranian president Rouhani has urged his cabinet to speed up the introduction of harsher laws against such killings

TEHRAN: The so-called honor killing of a 14-year-old Iranian girl by her father, who reportedly used a farming sickle to behead her as she slept, has prompted a nationwide outcry.
Reza Ashrafi, now in custody, was apparently enraged when he killed his daughter Romina on Thursday after she ran away with 34-year-old Bahamn Khavari in Talesh, some 320 kilometers (198 miles) northwest of the capital, Tehran.
In traditional societies in the Middle East, including Iran, blame would typically fall on a runaway girl for purportedly having sullied her family’s honor, rather than on an adult male luring away a child.
Romina was found five days after leaving home and taken to a police station, from where her father brought her back home. The girl reportedly told the police she feared a violent reaction from her father.
On Wednesday, a number of national newspapers featured the story prominently and the social media hashtag #RominaAshrafi reportedly has been used thousands times on social media, with most users condemning the killing.
Proposed legislation against honor killings has apparently shuttled for years among various decision-making bodies in Iran.
On Wednesday, Romina Ashrafi’s case led Iranian President Hassan Rouhani to urge his Cabinet to speed up harsher laws against such killings and he pushed for speedy adoption of relevant legislation.
There is little data on honor killings in Iran, where local media occasionally report on such cases. Under the law, girls can marry after the age of 13, though the average age of marriage for Iranian women is 23. It is not known how many women and young girls are killed by family members or close relatives because of their actions, perceived as violating conservative Islamic norms on love and marriage.
Iran’s judiciary said Romina’s case will be tried in a special court. Under the current law, her father faces a prison sentence of up to 10 years.
Iran’s vice president in charge of family affairs, Masoumeh Ebtekar, expressed hope that a bill with harsher punishments will soon be in the final stages of approval.
Shahnaz Sajjadi, special assistant to citizens’ rights in the presidential directorate on women and family affairs, on Wednesday told the khabaronline.ir news website “We should revise the idea that home is a safe place for children and women. Crimes that happen against women in the society are less than those that happen in the homes.”